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(NERC NERC NERC NERC)   Summer weather and energy supply outlook, with charts and graphs. Center of US is screwed, and west-of-center not much better. Go east, young man   (nerc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, United States, normal temperatures, Summer Reliability Assessment, high risk of energy shortfalls, average seasonal temperatures, North America, parts of North America, drought conditions  
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2021 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 May 2022 at 7:53 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-20 7:38:09 AM  
As an aside, I wonder if that b-29 at the bottom of lake Mead is any easier to reach these days...?
 
2022-05-20 7:56:31 AM  
Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.
 
2022-05-20 7:57:05 AM  
Just wait till the Nvidia 4090 is launched. It'll suck the power out of the rest of the United States in one gaming session.
 
2022-05-20 7:58:19 AM  
No. No, don't go east. We're all full over here. We ain't got enough room or water for folks who only now realizing they were treating their desert like it was an oasis. Just try to live with the consequences of your actions.
 
2022-05-20 8:01:41 AM  
I'm in the Red. What are they going to do, cut my po... (crackle)
 
2022-05-20 8:02:31 AM  

NoGods: No. No, don't go east. We're all full over here. We ain't got enough room or water for folks who only now realizing they were treating their desert like it was an oasis. Just try to live with the consequences of your actions.


People in Montana biatch about people moving here and have bumper stickers saying that Montana's full. Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.
 
2022-05-20 8:07:31 AM  

Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.


Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...
 
2022-05-20 8:14:29 AM  
Oh goodie. More California vs. Texas: which state is more on fire and without electricity?
 
2022-05-20 8:15:16 AM  

payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...


Oh-- I grew up on the actual Atlantic coast, so I've been through a few real real hurricanes. Andrew was dead by the time it hit the mountains. You get thunderstorms that bad every few years.
 
2022-05-20 8:18:18 AM  
Hi, this is New England speaking. Stay the hell away from us. We get our fill of you tourists during fall foliage and ski season.
 
2022-05-20 8:19:19 AM  
Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.

You haven't been to Maine.  You can start at the bottom and drive for 6 hours, and 5.5 hours will be pine trees.  Population density is 43 people / sq mile.  Compare with 334 people / sq mile in Massachusetts.

Then I remind people that, when  you reach the top of Maine, you enter Canada.  That's the second largest country in the world and it's ALL pine trees!
 
2022-05-20 8:22:48 AM  

claytonemery: Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.

You haven't been to Maine.  You can start at the bottom and drive for 6 hours, and 5.5 hours will be pine trees.  Population density is 43 people / sq mile.  Compare with 334 people / sq mile in Massachusetts.

Then I remind people that, when  you reach the top of Maine, you enter Canada.  That's the second largest country in the world and it's ALL pine trees!


I hiked Quoddy Head State Park in east as east can be Maine. East as east can be for the US, actually.

I will never forget walking through the trails and just getting hit by pine smell. It was like I was in air freshener. Good for the soul.
 
2022-05-20 8:23:25 AM  

NoGods: No. No, don't go east. We're all full over here. We ain't got enough room or water for folks who only now realizing they were treating their desert like it was an oasis. Just try to live with the consequences of your actions.


That and the fact we dont worry about the water here were used to wringing out the air if we are thirsty. May 20th and supposed to be 99 here today and dripping with humidity. I could use some dry heat every once and a while.
 
2022-05-20 8:27:04 AM  

Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.


May have to come your way if it stays like its supposed to be today. Only about an hour away by god.
 
2022-05-20 8:28:55 AM  

payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...


Had a 3.3 here in SC a little over a week ago.
 
2022-05-20 8:30:00 AM  

Weaver95: As an aside, I wonder if that b-29 at the bottom of lake Mead is any easier to reach these days...?


The Lady Of The Lake is real, and they've sent submersibles down to see her.

She is being eaten alive by mussels, algae, and time... but, what makes her special is she is the LAST extant B-29 in existence. There have been numerous (at least four) campaigns to save her, with even Bethesda pitching in a major donation to "ping-pong ball" raise her.

Nothing has come of it.
 
2022-05-20 8:32:26 AM  

Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.


Except for the whole 96 degrees and 80% humidity on May 20th
 
2022-05-20 8:36:31 AM  

Jedekai: Weaver95: As an aside, I wonder if that b-29 at the bottom of lake Mead is any easier to reach these days...?

The Lady Of The Lake is real, and they've sent submersibles down to see her.

She is being eaten alive by mussels, algae, and time... but, what makes her special is she is the LAST extant B-29 in existence. There have been numerous (at least four) campaigns to save her, with even Bethesda pitching in a major donation to "ping-pong ball" raise her.

Nothing has come of it.


I'll bet she's a lot more accessible these days.
And if current rates of decline remain steady, it might actually be possible to raise that plane from the bottom.
 
2022-05-20 8:36:57 AM  
How the hell is Texas only "elevated risk" on that map?

They're already going "Please turn stuff off" to try to reduce max load and its not even June yet.
 
2022-05-20 8:37:26 AM  

kittyhas1000legs: NoGods: No. No, don't go east. We're all full over here. We ain't got enough room or water for folks who only now realizing they were treating their desert like it was an oasis. Just try to live with the consequences of your actions.

People in Montana biatch about people moving here and have bumper stickers saying that Montana's full. Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.


Try upstate ny.  You can drive for hours and all you pass is forests, farms and tiny towns with no phone service.
 
2022-05-20 8:38:37 AM  

Netrngr: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Had a 3.3 here in SC a little over a week ago.


I'm about 100 yards from a very heavily used railroad. I get into the 4s because of the trains several times a day.
 
2022-05-20 8:44:19 AM  

payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...


Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
Fark user imageView Full Size

Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.
 
2022-05-20 8:56:08 AM  

Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.


Fran did damage at least as far west as Raleigh. But hurricanes don't make it to the mountains.
 
2022-05-20 8:57:37 AM  

Sleeper_agent: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Oh-- I grew up on the actual Atlantic coast, so I've been through a few real real hurricanes. Andrew was dead by the time it hit the mountains. You get thunderstorms that bad every few years.


Case and point Hugo. It took out live oaks in my parent's yard that were 3 feet around and well over 200 years old. SC has been either on the weak side or avoided most hurricanes since then which is weird because Charleston was the hurricane magnet of the east coast for decades. It seemed like the harbor just beckoned those big blowhards in.
 
2022-05-20 9:01:46 AM  

Netrngr: Sleeper_agent: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Oh-- I grew up on the actual Atlantic coast, so I've been through a few real real hurricanes. Andrew was dead by the time it hit the mountains. You get thunderstorms that bad every few years.

Case and point Hugo. It took out live oaks in my parent's yard that were 3 feet around and well over 200 years old. SC has been either on the weak side or avoided most hurricanes since then which is weird because Charleston was the hurricane magnet of the east coast for decades. It seemed like the harbor just beckoned those big blowhards in.


And thunderstorms do that kind of thing too. Hurricanes, on the coast, rip buildings off the ground. If you're 200 miles inland a hurricane is just a long thunderstorm. Relatively, not a big deal.
 
2022-05-20 9:01:51 AM  

Sleeper_agent: Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.

Fran did damage at least as far west as Raleigh. But MOST hurricanes don't make it to the mountains.


FTFY
 
2022-05-20 9:06:22 AM  

Netrngr: Sleeper_agent: Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.

Fran did damage at least as far west as Raleigh. But MOST hurricanes don't make it to the mountains.

FTFY


You know that Raleigh is like 100 miles east of the mountains right? Has any storm ever still been classed as "hurricane" by the time it hit the mountains? Very few I'd bet. Maybe Tropical storm. Usually Tropical depression.
 
2022-05-20 9:29:41 AM  

claytonemery: Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.

You haven't been to Maine.  You can start at the bottom and drive for 6 hours, and 5.5 hours will be pine trees.  Population density is 43 people / sq mile.  Compare with 334 people / sq mile in Massachusetts.

Then I remind people that, when  you reach the top of Maine, you enter Canada.  That's the second largest country in the world and it's ALL pine trees!


Canada is just the United States' strategic timber reserve.
 
2022-05-20 9:36:36 AM  

Sleeper_agent: Netrngr: Sleeper_agent: Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.

Fran did damage at least as far west as Raleigh. But MOST hurricanes don't make it to the mountains.

FTFY

You know that Raleigh is like 100 miles east of the mountains right? Has any storm ever still been classed as "hurricane" by the time it hit the mountains? Very few I'd bet. Maybe Tropical storm. Usually Tropical depression.


Pretty sure Hugo was still a hurricane by the time it reached the mountains. Like I said most dont but a few big ones are still hurricane force when they do. Either way its already hot here I need to find a cool place to hide.
 
2022-05-20 9:51:26 AM  
Here in SE Wisconsin, I have gotten several notices from the power company to reduce our electrical provider that we need to significantly reduce our power usage in order to prevent brownouts or full out rolling blackouts.  Since they took the P4 (Pleasant Prairie Power Plant) off line (and are almost finished with taking the facility down, so no chance of ever bringing it back online) we have had multiple power outages or voltage drops that we have not had prior to them taking it off line.  Now they are planning to take the other coal fired plant off line (Up near the South end of Milwaukee), so that means even less power available for the area.  Gee, I wonder what THAT will do to the grid.

And now they want to push everyone to buy/drive electric cars?

Where is all of this electric power coming from?
 
2022-05-20 9:55:07 AM  

Netrngr: Sleeper_agent: Netrngr: Sleeper_agent: Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.

Fran did damage at least as far west as Raleigh. But MOST hurricanes don't make it to the mountains.

FTFY

You know that Raleigh is like 100 miles east of the mountains right? Has any storm ever still been classed as "hurricane" by the time it hit the mountains? Very few I'd bet. Maybe Tropical storm. Usually Tropical depression.

Pretty sure Hugo was still a hurricane by the time it reached the mountains. Like I said most dont but a few big ones are still hurricane force when they do. Either way its already hot here I need to find a cool place to hide.


Just head on down to the holler for some skinny dippin. It'll cool you right off.

(I just sit in a baby pool in the backyard with a beer-- environmentally responsible-- no driving).
 
2022-05-20 10:06:34 AM  
The Red for Miso in the Midwest is because they keep shutting down big, reliable nuke and coal plants, and the various states doesn't let the companies build gas plants to replace them.  So, they might have some new windmill farms, but those are unreliable and change on a whim of nature. It looks good on paper to reduce greenhouse gasses, but it is so misguided.
 
2022-05-20 10:14:00 AM  
Guess I better check the generator again and make sure it is working.  It will run the window AC in the bedroom if we need it to so we can at least get some sleep!
 
2022-05-20 11:02:26 AM  
Canada is just the United States' strategic timber reserve.

Reminds of a Favorite Fun Fact: The US Navy maintains a forest in Indiana.

https://www.military.com/history/why-us-navy-manages-its-own-private-forest.html
 
2022-05-20 11:30:07 AM  

Netrngr: It seemed like the harbor just beckoned those big blowhards in.


That's no way to talk about your mom.
 
2022-05-20 12:32:00 PM  
"NERC's 2022 Summer Reliability Assessment warns that several parts of North America are at elevated or high risk of energy shortfalls this summer"

Don't be a NERC, man
 
2022-05-20 5:28:09 PM  

ctighe2353: kittyhas1000legs: NoGods: No. No, don't go east. We're all full over here. We ain't got enough room or water for folks who only now realizing they were treating their desert like it was an oasis. Just try to live with the consequences of your actions.

People in Montana biatch about people moving here and have bumper stickers saying that Montana's full. Growing up in the northeast I can say that that area IS full, driving anywhere is miserable, and there's nowhere you can go to avoid people and get some goddamn peace and quiet. My old neighbor compared CT to a cage with too many animals in it.

Try upstate ny.  You can drive for hours and all you pass is forests, farms and tiny towns with no phone service.


I'm right by water that shouldn't dry up until the glaciers are gone.

My brother in law wants to move out of mid/upstate NY to eastern Oregon.  Smart guy, him.
 
2022-05-20 8:40:54 PM  

Jedekai: Weaver95: As an aside, I wonder if that b-29 at the bottom of lake Mead is any easier to reach these days...?

The Lady Of The Lake is real, and they've sent submersibles down to see her.

She is being eaten alive by mussels, algae, and time... but, what makes her special is she is the LAST extant B-29 in existence. There have been numerous (at least four) campaigns to save her, with even Bethesda pitching in a major donation to "ping-pong ball" raise her.

Nothing has come of it.


You must mean something really specific by "last extant B-29" here... there's like two dozen whole ones, two that fly, another dozen in restoration, and multiple wrecks.  What specific thing is this the last one of?
 
2022-05-20 9:48:43 PM  

Spaceballer: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Are you possibly thinking of Hugo?
[Fark user image 425x432]
Andrew went across south Florida and then turned north, by the time Andrew made it to the mountains he was not only merely dead, he was really most sincerely dead.


Considering how long ago it was and how old and fried I am, yes, that could be the one I was thinking of. All I know was my friend who lived up in Wilksboro said it was pretty freaking wild.
 
2022-05-20 9:50:53 PM  

Netrngr: payattention: Sleeper_agent: Appalachian Piedmont all the way. Hardly any tornadoes. Hurricanes are dead by the time they get here. Plenty of water. You can always go up into the mountains if it gets too hot.

Well... I seem to remember Hurricane Andrew hitting the North Carolina mountains and it was not exactly 'dead' at that time. But, yes, other than the mudslides, the occasional road collapse, and the earthquakes, you are in a decent spot. (No, there have not been any substantial earthquakes up there in a long time, but that just means the clock is ticking. There is a fault there and it is just a matter of time.)

/ain't no such place as the 'perfect' place...

Had a 3.3 here in SC a little over a week ago.


I know. My buddy in Columbia texted me about it. That was still a shudder compared to what will hit around there eventually. It's scary.
 
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