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(NJ.com)   If only there was a way lawmakers could change the law so police couldn't issue tickets for license plate frames. If only   (nj.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Supreme Court of the United States, vehicle's license plate, United States Congress, New Jersey, Legislature, license plate violations, New Jersey drivers, State supreme court  
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2195 clicks; posted to Politics » on 20 May 2022 at 6:17 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-20 2:55:02 AM  
Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.
 
2022-05-20 6:22:31 AM  
If it wasn't for pretext stops, how would cops be able to check for the smell of illegal drugs?
 
2022-05-20 6:24:41 AM  
"Most of these citations were for frames covering a part of the license plate that did not prevent identification of the vehicle..."

All in the name of $afety.
 
2022-05-20 6:27:34 AM  
It's an excuse to pull over those people. Like when they pull someone over because of an air freshener hanging from their mirror.
 
2022-05-20 6:28:44 AM  
"If 'Garden State,' 'New Jersey,' or some other phrase is covered to the point that the phrase cannot be identified, or the plate numbers can't be read, the law would likewise apply. But "if those phrases were partly covered, yet still recognizable, there would be no violation," he said.


Relying on LEO discretion always ends well.
 
2022-05-20 6:30:22 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.


Republicans are aiming to destroy the union and create a Gilead and yet one still found enough time to propose a bill that was in line with a Democrat's bill.

This is like the Orcs of Mordor stopping mid rampage and saying "Hey, Gandalf. Before we eat your hobbits, don't you think Gondor's cart laws are out of control? If we fix, Middle Earth will be better no matter who eating who."
 
2022-05-20 6:31:36 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-20 6:49:52 AM  
i5.walmartimages.comView Full Size

On second thought, let's keep the tickets coming.
 
2022-05-20 6:52:08 AM  
If only there were a way Subby could know what the article actually says.  If only.
 
2022-05-20 6:55:29 AM  
I noticed an Indiana plate in a Kent State University frame yesterday. Wondered if the driver had simply gone to Kent state, if he was proud of his service in the National Guard or was just politically supportive of the shooting.
 
2022-05-20 7:01:08 AM  
Thin blue line!
Cops putting it on the line to make us safer!
The brotherhood!
The "real heroes!

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2022-05-20 7:22:16 AM  
No mention of those gray (polarized?) films that cover the entire plate. That are an obvious ploy to get over on somebody.
 
2022-05-20 7:40:22 AM  
Your Honor, I was framed!
 
2022-05-20 7:47:44 AM  
Perhaps the reason there are so many citations for this is that it isn't a moving violation. No points and a small fine. Cops see someone go through a red light late or some other moving violation, so they pull them over, give them a scolding and issue this instead of the moving violation.

On the other hand, as was mentioned, this could also just be a revenue generation move for the police.
 
2022-05-20 7:51:51 AM  
And yet most people won't be stopped for not having headlights on when it's raining.
 
2022-05-20 7:56:25 AM  

sinner4ever: It's an excuse to pull over those people. Like when they pull someone over because of an air freshener hanging from their mirror.


If I was a state law maker, I'd propose banning all traffic stops except for someone fleeing a crime, running a red light or stop sign, going 15 percent over the speed limit, or blatant reckless driving, like cutting across multiple lanes on the highway. And then my political career would end.
 
2022-05-20 7:59:33 AM  

alechemist: And yet most people won't be stopped for not having headlights on when it's raining.


One of the many reasons I am not a cop is that I would be such an asshole about this specific thing.
 
2022-05-20 8:02:28 AM  

tedduque: Perhaps the reason there are so many citations for this is that it isn't a moving violation. No points and a small fine. Cops see someone go through a red light late or some other moving violation, so they pull them over, give them a scolding and issue this instead of the moving violation.

On the other hand, as was mentioned, this could also just be a revenue generation move for the police.


I'm not really sure what your point is. Once the cops pull you over for whatever reason, that the gives them a way to go to town on you. As others have said, when they approach your car, if they smell something funny, then they can search it. Or they don't like your attitude because you're obviously defensive and upset about getting a ticket for something minor, and next thing you know, you're being arrested.

Bottom line: there's no reason why anyone should be pulled over for this. Take a picture of the plate and send a fine in the mail.
 
2022-05-20 8:04:54 AM  
In most states, so long as the registration sticker and state name, and of course the really big numbers and letters across the center of the plate, are legible, you are fine.

A pet peeve of mine are those dealership frames that say where you bought it.  Those almost always cover up the damn sticker and are a scorge
 
2022-05-20 8:13:19 AM  

TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.


I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.
 
2022-05-20 8:16:16 AM  

winedrinkingman: In most states, so long as the registration sticker and state name, and of course the really big numbers and letters across the center of the plate, are legible, you are fine.

A pet peeve of mine are those dealership frames that say where you bought it.  Those almost always cover up the damn sticker and are a scorge


According to the article, that's basically the way it's supposed to work here, but the cops are stopping people when they shouldn't.

In other words, the problem is not the law, but cops ignoring the law.

Who would ever expect that?
 
2022-05-20 8:25:58 AM  

thornhill: TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.

I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.


Around here people who bother putting a plate on their vehicle at all (and as far as I can tell you must not need one on a pickup because half of them just don't have one) cover the whole plate with a sheet of black plastic that's just barely translucent. If you are less than ten feet away you might catch the plate number in direct sunlight. Otherwise it's just a rectangle on the back of the car.

Another good trick is putting your plate in the back window of your vehicle instead of on the outside, and tinting your windows about 40%.

I'm in favor of summary roadside beatings with a rubber hose for these people.

Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?
 
2022-05-20 8:34:27 AM  

Snapper Carr: "If 'Garden State,' 'New Jersey,' or some other phrase is covered to the point that the phrase cannot be identified, or the plate numbers can't be read, the law would likewise apply. But "if those phrases were partly covered, yet still recognizable, there would be no violation," he said.


Relying on LEO discretion always ends well.


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2022-05-20 8:37:04 AM  
Last week I was driving behind a car that had a license plate that seemed odd, but I could not figure out why it looked odd so I took a pic of it when we were at a stop light.

Later I looked closer at it and realized they had added an extra digit somehow.  Right in the middle.

In the State of IL our plates normally have a max of 7 characters.  3 on the left, then a small space, then 4 on the right. Or some variation of that.   This one had a very convincing extra slightly squished "0" in the space for 8 characters total.

I tried looking up the plate using a web-base Plate Look up and got nothing, but if I removed that extra "0" I got a match on the SUV that it was registered to.

Technically the actual numbers of the original plate were not obscured so I guess no laws broken.
 
2022-05-20 8:41:53 AM  

RI_Red: "Most of these citations were for frames covering a part of the license plate that did not prevent identification of the vehicle..."

All in the name of $afety.


All fines should have to be remitted at least one level of government up from where they were originated.

That should recalibrate the amount of $afety tickets.
 
2022-05-20 8:44:02 AM  
Prosecutors could nolle prosequi any/all cases that come from these pretext stops (including dismissing any/all citations for it).

One county prosecutor in Ramsey County (Minnesota) announced he will not prosecute any felony charges that arise from low-level traffic stops: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2021/09/08/ramsey-county-ends-felony-prosecutions-from-lowlevel-stops
 
2022-05-20 8:47:05 AM  

winedrinkingman: A pet peeve of mine are those dealership frames that say where you bought it.  Those almost always cover up the damn sticker and are a scorge


When buying a car, tell the porter prepping your car to take it off. I do that every time.

"If you pay me to advertise for you, you can leave it on."

My dad's last used car purchase had a vinyl sticker of [dealer name dot com] across the back window. I saw that, grabbed the salesman, and said "Get that shiat off of there." A guy with a razor scraper took it off.
 
2022-05-20 8:48:05 AM  

Koodz: Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?


Why do you care so much?
 
2022-05-20 8:53:32 AM  

BMFPitt: All fines should have to be remitted at least one level of government up from where they were originated.

That should recalibrate the amount of $afety tickets.


My state did this many years ago and it's somewhat prevented the shiatty parts of Illinois in policing for profit.

I don't know when, but at some point the state legislature did a couple things:
1. Traffic citations became uniform across the state, by state laws,
2. The state preëmpted localities, meaning local governments cannot have local laws that are the same or mirror traffic citations, and;
3. The fines are a fixed split that goes to the state, with a portion going to the county court that handles it, and then a smaller portion goes to the agency issuing the ticket.

This means cities cannot pass their own speeding laws and have rigged courts where they keep all the cash. This means police departments cannot have ticket blitzes where they rake in the money, because the amount kicked back to them from any citations does not cover what they are doing with a profit on top of that.

It doesn't totally stop some departments from being complete arseholes about writing tickets everywhere they can, but it means they cannot profit from it.
 
2022-05-20 9:10:41 AM  

Koodz: thornhill: TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.

I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.

Around here people who bother putting a plate on their vehicle at all (and as far as I can tell you must not need one on a pickup because half of them just don't have one) cover the whole plate with a sheet of black plastic that's just barely translucent. If you are less than ten feet away you might catch the plate number in direct sunlight. Otherwise it's just a rectangle on the back of the car.

Another good trick is putting your plate in the back window of your vehicle instead of on the outside, and tinting your windows about 40%.

I'm in favor of summary roadside beatings with a rubber hose for these people.

Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?


So what? All of these laws regarding the visibility of a license plate number are a solution to a nonexistent problem.

How often is it actually necessary for police to know the plate number from a distance of more than 10 feet? When someone is drag racing on the highway and the cops cannot catch up to them, or when a car is fleeing a crime scene? How often are those scenarios actually happening? And things are probably moving so quickly that the cops cannot actually capture the plate number -- they have to rely on video recordings.

I challenge you to find a news story where if it wasn't for someone being able to capture a license plate number from a distance, a legitimate criminal would have gotten away with a crime.
 
2022-05-20 9:27:27 AM  
Having read the article, I still know nothing about the legal visibility requirements for NJ license plates, but I know a lot more about the fascist and petty nature of NJ LEOs.

/Also a few LEO boot polish fetishists on here.
 
2022-05-20 9:31:41 AM  
The goal of a police state is to make everyone a criminal by making the individual actions that comprise "normal living" some sort of crime and subject to detention or arrest, or to be threatened with arrest.  And with that comes blackmail and exploitation.  Speed limits, drug possession, license-plate frames, all reasons for a bored cop to relieve that boredom with harassing somebody and maybe get a BJ or some loose cash or some pot.

While of course police and prosecutors have some discretion in their duties, the fact is that the more laws that are on the books the more power they have to grant or deny that discretion.
 
2022-05-20 9:40:33 AM  

I'm an excellent driver: Having read the article, I still know nothing about the legal visibility requirements for NJ license plates, but I know a lot more about the fascist and petty nature of NJ LEOs.

/Also a few LEO boot polish fetishists on here.


Cops decided long ago that they can't justify their budgets unless they maintain a high level of visibility through routine enforcement of their subjective interpretation of the law.

A good analogy is sports referees: Cops love a game that ends with all the fans arguing over a sketchy call because it keeps attention on the refs, whereas to the rest of us, it would be much better for the refs to just stay the fark out of the way unless there's an egregious, objective violation of the rules.
 
2022-05-20 10:00:36 AM  

mrmopar5287: winedrinkingman: A pet peeve of mine are those dealership frames that say where you bought it.  Those almost always cover up the damn sticker and are a scorge

When buying a car, tell the porter prepping your car to take it off. I do that every time.

"If you pay me to advertise for you, you can leave it on."

My dad's last used car purchase had a vinyl sticker of [dealer name dot com] across the back window. I saw that, grabbed the salesman, and said "Get that shiat off of there." A guy with a razor scraper took it off.


I've had to get it in writing myself. Otherwise they "forget" to pass the message on to whoever does the work.
 
2022-05-20 10:03:14 AM  

thornhill: Koodz: thornhill: TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.

I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.

Around here people who bother putting a plate on their vehicle at all (and as far as I can tell you must not need one on a pickup because half of them just don't have one) cover the whole plate with a sheet of black plastic that's just barely translucent. If you are less than ten feet away you might catch the plate number in direct sunlight. Otherwise it's just a rectangle on the back of the car.

Another good trick is putting your plate in the back window of your vehicle instead of on the outside, and tinting your windows about 40%.

I'm in favor of summary roadside beatings with a rubber hose for these people.

Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?

So what? All of these laws regarding the visibility of a license plate number are a solution to a nonexistent problem.

How often is it actually necessary for police to know the plate number from a distance of more than 10 feet? When someone is drag racing on the highway and the cops cannot catch up to them, or when a car is fleeing a crime scene? How often are those scenarios actually happening? And things are probably moving so quickly that the cops cannot actually capture the plate number -- they have to rely on video recordings.

I challenge you to find a news story where if it wasn't ...


I reject your challenge. Ain't nobody got time for that, but yeah, people flee the scene of things all the time and it is often noted that no license plate number was observed. Why do you think we have license plates?

And I don't care about drag racing. I care about hit and run accidents, and yeah, knowing the plate number is going to help find whoever hit you. If you cover your plate you plan on escaping identification when you commit some kind of crime, period.
 
2022-05-20 10:23:59 AM  

thornhill: tedduque: Perhaps the reason there are so many citations for this is that it isn't a moving violation. No points and a small fine. Cops see someone go through a red light late or some other moving violation, so they pull them over, give them a scolding and issue this instead of the moving violation.

On the other hand, as was mentioned, this could also just be a revenue generation move for the police.

I'm not really sure what your point is. Once the cops pull you over for whatever reason, that the gives them a way to go to town on you. As others have said, when they approach your car, if they smell something funny, then they can search it. Or they don't like your attitude because you're obviously defensive and upset about getting a ticket for something minor, and next thing you know, you're being arrested.

Bottom line: there's no reason why anyone should be pulled over for this. Take a picture of the plate and send a fine in the mail.

The sheer number of these tickets implies that either the cops are really bad at finding something more substantial to ticket for, this is about revenue generation, or, as I said, cops need to issue *something* when they pull someone over and they are being nice (*gasp*!) and issuing a non moving violation after the appropriate warning for the real offense.


If cops were using this just as a pretext to be able to search the car, they likely would find themselves on the bad side of a judge before too long. Even more, changing this law won't stop cops that do that.
 
2022-05-20 10:29:18 AM  

tedduque: cops need to issue *something* when they pull someone over and they are being nice (*gasp*!) and issuing a non moving violation after the appropriate warning for the real offense


At a DUI stop where I was the DD and still got hassled through the field sobriety exam that I "failed" but then blew a 0.00 on their portable breathalyzer, the *something* issued to me was a ticket for "failure to carry/produce driver license." I was told that I could just go show the license to the court clerk and the ticket was dismissable on the spot by the clerk.

I started to protest that I gave them my license, so why was I being ticketed for this? The cop explained that it was the *something* that I could walk away with and it was a *something* that could be dismissed.

The cops got to make their paperwork look good by issuing *something* and I got off easy with what amounted to nothing, even though the something/nothing was inappropriate and undeserved.
 
2022-05-20 10:38:29 AM  

sinner4ever: It's an excuse to pull over those people. Like when they pull someone over because of an air freshener hanging from their mirror.


Almost all of the time, yes. My state has the annual tags with the month on the lower left, and the year tag on the lower right. I saw a car yesterday with the plate frame covering the year tag completely (it wasn't a square frame, it was something cutesy). It could have easily been a ploy to avoid having to buy tags every year. The car was parked, but I could see that driver getting pulled over several times before getting home.
Daunte Wright. Expired tags. Air freshener hanging from mirror. Outstanding warrant. Shot dead while resisting arrest.
You forgot the quotes around "those" people.
 
2022-05-20 10:58:53 AM  

tedduque: thornhill:

...Bottom line: there's no reason why anyone should be pulled over for this. Take a picture of the plate and send a fine in the mail.
The sheer number of these tickets implies that either the cops are really bad at finding something more substantial to ticket for, this is about revenue generation, or, as I said, cops need to issue *something* when they pull someone over and they are being nice (*gasp*!) and issuing a non moving violation after the appropriate warning for the real offense.


If cops were using this just as a pretext to be able to search the car, they likely would find themselves on the bad side of a judge before too long. Even more, changing this law won't stop cops that do that.


Judges do sometimes get ticked in favor of citizens. I was in traffic court one day where many of the cases were from a particular jurisdiction, and most of them stemming from drinking in the park, which was legal. At one point the judge stood up and said: How many more cases do we have here today from the park? Stand up." Many did. "See the clerk; your case is dismissed."
 
2022-05-20 11:15:22 AM  

mrmopar5287: tedduque: cops need to issue *something* when they pull someone over and they are being nice (*gasp*!) and issuing a non moving violation after the appropriate warning for the real offense

At a DUI stop where I was the DD and still got hassled through the field sobriety exam that I "failed" but then blew a 0.00 on their portable breathalyzer, the *something* issued to me was a ticket for "failure to carry/produce driver license." I was told that I could just go show the license to the court clerk and the ticket was dismissable on the spot by the clerk.

I started to protest that I gave them my license, so why was I being ticketed for this? The cop explained that it was the *something* that I could walk away with and it was a *something* that could be dismissed.

The cops got to make their paperwork look good by issuing *something* and I got off easy with what amounted to nothing, even though the something/nothing was inappropriate and undeserved.


We had a cop around here issuing DUI tickets to people blowing well below the limit and even as low as 0.0 in at least one case. It took a couple of years, but he was kicked out and moved out of state after a couple of lawsuits. Last I heard, he now has a consulting business telling people how to beat DUI charges.

It happens that cops use the license plate as a pretext. It also happens cops need to pull people over for running a red light, if for no other reason then as an indication to other drivers they will get pulled over if they do it, but don't think it really warrants a ticket and points. So they issue the license plate violation. Other motorists don't know what the ticket is for and could easily think it is for the red light. Everyone comes away happy.
 
2022-05-20 11:25:21 AM  

tedduque: We had a cop around here issuing DUI tickets to people blowing well below the limit and even as low as 0.0 in at least one case


What did the prosecutor do with those cases?

Someone blowing 0.07 or 0.06 can be a decision. If they are obviously intoxicated at that level, the de facto threshold of 0.08 won't save them.
 
2022-05-20 11:44:17 AM  

tedduque: thornhill: tedduque: Perhaps the reason there are so many citations for this is that it isn't a moving violation. No points and a small fine. Cops see someone go through a red light late or some other moving violation, so they pull them over, give them a scolding and issue this instead of the moving violation.

On the other hand, as was mentioned, this could also just be a revenue generation move for the police.

I'm not really sure what your point is. Once the cops pull you over for whatever reason, that the gives them a way to go to town on you. As others have said, when they approach your car, if they smell something funny, then they can search it. Or they don't like your attitude because you're obviously defensive and upset about getting a ticket for something minor, and next thing you know, you're being arrested.

Bottom line: there's no reason why anyone should be pulled over for this. Take a picture of the plate and send a fine in the mail.
The sheer number of these tickets implies that either the cops are really bad at finding something more substantial to ticket for, this is about revenue generation, or, as I said, cops need to issue *something* when they pull someone over and they are being nice (*gasp*!) and issuing a non moving violation after the appropriate warning for the real offense.


This.

CSB - I grew up in Northern New Jersey in the late 80s and about a week or two after I started driving, I got pulled over in my town for having a frame around my license plate and given a verbal warning (the cops in my town apparently pulled over all new drivers just to make sure we knew they were watching).

But, I never took the frame off for this very reason - it gave the cops something to give a non-points ticket with a small fine for if you are able to talk your way out of a moving violation.

The unintended consequence of this law is that cops may now just write the ticket for the moving violation, which comes with higher fines, points and higher insurance premiums.
 
2022-05-20 12:26:55 PM  
I honestly can't see why people would bother with license plate frames when the possibility exists that some cop might use it as a pretext to pull you over. Most other drivers barely even notice the things, and when they do they rarely give the slightest of f*cks what they actually say. "Oh, you went to [college name]. Cool beans, who cares."

It's an extremely marginal benefit to have vs a not inconsiderable amount of risk taken. Just leave your plate naked and get a bumper sticker if you feel that strongly that you need to advertise something on the back of your car.
 
2022-05-20 12:36:53 PM  

Koodz: thornhill: Koodz: thornhill: TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.

I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.

Around here people who bother putting a plate on their vehicle at all (and as far as I can tell you must not need one on a pickup because half of them just don't have one) cover the whole plate with a sheet of black plastic that's just barely translucent. If you are less than ten feet away you might catch the plate number in direct sunlight. Otherwise it's just a rectangle on the back of the car.

Another good trick is putting your plate in the back window of your vehicle instead of on the outside, and tinting your windows about 40%.

I'm in favor of summary roadside beatings with a rubber hose for these people.

Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?

So what? All of these laws regarding the visibility of a license plate number are a solution to a nonexistent problem.

How often is it actually necessary for police to know the plate number from a distance of more than 10 feet? When someone is drag racing on the highway and the cops cannot catch up to them, or when a car is fleeing a crime scene? How often are those scenarios actually happening? And things are probably moving so quickly that the cops cannot actually capture the plate number -- they have to rely on video recordings.

I challenge you to find a news story where if ...

I reject your challenge. Ain't nobody got time for that, but yeah, people flee the scene of things all the time and it is often noted that no license plate number was observed. Why do you think we have license plates?

And I don't care about drag racing. I care about hit and run accidents, and yeah, knowing the plate number is going to help find whoever hit you. If you cover your plate you plan on escaping identification when you commit some kind of crime, period.


You just provided my point. The license plate doesn't really help solve any crimes. If you read news stories, it's cameras, cell phones, and GPS that are used to track down cars involved in a crime. The law enforcement value of a license plate is a relic from a pre-digital age (the main way it's used now is for parking ticket enforcement). The importance you put on it comes from having seen movies and TV shows where spotting the plate number is always a crucial piece of evidence -- "did someone get the plate number?!."
 
2022-05-20 12:56:29 PM  

thornhill: sinner4ever: It's an excuse to pull over those people. Like when they pull someone over because of an air freshener hanging from their mirror.

If I was a state law maker, I'd propose banning all traffic stops except for someone fleeing a crime, running a red light or stop sign, going 15 percent over the speed limit, or blatant reckless driving, like cutting across multiple lanes on the highway. And then my political career would end.


I noticed you didn't mention following too closely. Are you a habitual tailgater?
 
2022-05-20 1:41:03 PM  
I like the silicone plate frames. They just cover the ¼ inch edge, come in common colors, silence rattles, protect your skin, the plate, and the car. Traditional frames suck.
 
2022-05-20 3:01:51 PM  

thornhill: Koodz: thornhill: Koodz: thornhill: TwowheelinTim: Or you could avoid getting pulled over in the first place by not covering up your license plate.

I'm sure the data shows that in 99 percent of cases, the the plate number is not obscured - I've never seen a frame that was so thick that it covered up the number. Maybe it covers up the state name, but do you really need that to identify the vehicle? And maybe it obscures the registration sticker, but can you really see that unless you're right behind the car? I mean, if that sticker was so vital, it would be a lot larger.

So if a car is fleeing a crime scene or accident, I highly doubt anyone has a frame that would prevent the police from identifying the car.

Around here people who bother putting a plate on their vehicle at all (and as far as I can tell you must not need one on a pickup because half of them just don't have one) cover the whole plate with a sheet of black plastic that's just barely translucent. If you are less than ten feet away you might catch the plate number in direct sunlight. Otherwise it's just a rectangle on the back of the car.

Another good trick is putting your plate in the back window of your vehicle instead of on the outside, and tinting your windows about 40%.

I'm in favor of summary roadside beatings with a rubber hose for these people.

Why is it so hard to just not put shiat on, over, or around your license plate?

So what? All of these laws regarding the visibility of a license plate number are a solution to a nonexistent problem.

How often is it actually necessary for police to know the plate number from a distance of more than 10 feet? When someone is drag racing on the highway and the cops cannot catch up to them, or when a car is fleeing a crime scene? How often are those scenarios actually happening? And things are probably moving so quickly that the cops cannot actually capture the plate number -- they have to rely on video recordings.

I challenge you to find a news story w ...


What do you think those cameras are photographing that lets law enforcement find the car? The sick flames painted on the side?
 
2022-05-20 8:00:48 PM  

LurkerSupreme: I honestly can't see why people would bother with license plate frames when the possibility exists that some cop might use it as a pretext to pull you over. Most other drivers barely even notice the things, and when they do they rarely give the slightest of f*cks what they actually say. "Oh, you went to [college name]. Cool beans, who cares."

It's an extremely marginal benefit to have vs a not inconsiderable amount of risk taken. Just leave your plate naked and get a bumper sticker if you feel that strongly that you need to advertise something on the back of your car.


It matters not whether you have a license plate frame. If a cop wants to pull you over, you are going to get pulled over. Windows are too tinted, didn't come to a complete stop, or you stopped in the cross walk, etc., etc. There are just too many reasons a cop can pull you over to be able to make it impossible for them to find one.
 
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