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(CNN)   Department of Energy project intends to create a new sucky US industry   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Carbon dioxide, Fossil fuel, Direct air carbon removal projects, Global warming, carbon dioxide, direct air capture hubs, Natural gas, multi-gigaton carbon removal scale  
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772 clicks; posted to STEM » on 19 May 2022 at 9:03 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-05-19 9:12:22 PM  
In before multi-billion means nothing in today's spending.  Sent 40B to Ukraine (and I'm not complaining).  But lets spend 2B on climate reversal.
 
2022-05-19 9:14:22 PM  
How are you gonna power them? You need to use renewable power for it to make sense, and until the grid is full renewable the power would be put to better use replacing fossil fuels.

Well, we've decided doing less or using less or not burning fossil fuels is too much to ask, I guess, so instead we'll try to technology our way out again. Let's hope it works, because if it does what I suspect - provide cover to burn more natural gas and oil - it had better work goddamn well.
 
2022-05-19 9:36:50 PM  
they're called trees
 
2022-05-19 9:49:51 PM  
Porous volcanic rock removes carbon from the atmosphere. Perhaps we can start putting it everywhere.
 
2022-05-19 9:54:09 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees


We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.
 
2022-05-19 10:00:00 PM  
In other words, a blatant grift constructing a thumb to plug a dike overtopping with carbon consumption.

Or a band-aid on a 12-gage gut wound.

Effing pointless feel-good theft.
 
2022-05-19 10:24:46 PM  

anuran: PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees

We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.


And we've not reached a point where technological solutions don't merely make things worse.
 
2022-05-19 10:44:14 PM  

anuran: PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees

We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.


Harvest trees. Partially burn them to produce charcoal. Bury the charcoal. Plant new trees. Repeat as needed.

Under some conditions, grasses are better at absorbing carbon (stored in root systems) than trees. Desalinate water and pump it inland to encourage this.

Encourage whales to fark and repopulate the oceans. They can support carbon-absorbing ecosystems by cycling nutrients from the deep up to the surface where they poop.
 
2022-05-19 11:00:23 PM  

anuran: PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees

We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.


Wood might not be fast enough, but perhaps growing switchgrass or hemp, making bio-char, and burying that in the fields via trenches several feet deep. But first it's vital everyone stops burning coal, or no amount of effort is going to match that output.

I'd be worried about trying to stuff carbon dioxide into a natural formation. It turns to liquid at high pressure, so you could stuff a whole lot of it in someplace you pumped oil out of. But it's also a non-ionic solvent, so it's going to loosen whatever else is down there. Heck, it's already standard to pump CO2 down a well to clean the wax. Come back one day and find everyone is dead, like next to that African lake where the deep water is still and accumulated so much carbon dioxide a landslide set it off like a Mentos.
 
2022-05-19 11:12:27 PM  

wildcardjack: anuran: PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees

We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.

Wood might not be fast enough, but perhaps growing switchgrass or hemp, making bio-char, and burying that in the fields via trenches several feet deep. But first it's vital everyone stops burning coal, or no amount of effort is going to match that output.

I'd be worried about trying to stuff carbon dioxide into a natural formation. It turns to liquid at high pressure, so you could stuff a whole lot of it in someplace you pumped oil out of. But it's also a non-ionic solvent, so it's going to loosen whatever else is down there. Heck, it's already standard to pump CO2 down a well to clean the wax. Come back one day and find everyone is dead, like next to that African lake where the deep water is still and accumulated so much carbon dioxide a landslide set it off like a Mentos.


Deep-sea storage is an option.

https://www.technologyreview.com/2006/08/08/228472/storing-carbon-dioxide-under-the-ocean/
 
2022-05-19 11:59:37 PM  
I knew it.  Let's build some more shiat!

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2022-05-20 12:37:31 AM  

PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees


If you could manage the eggs, using zebra mussels and other bivalves could accomplish several things.

Shells are calcium carbonate, so that's some carbon sequestration. Possibly use the crushed shells as a substitute for sand in concrete. The crushed shells would have the sharp edges that are found in mined sands, but not on beach sand.

Use the bivalves to filter treated sewage. Zebra mussels are in the Great Lakes, and they've made the water so clear it's produced algae blooms. The bad part of the blooms is that the dead algae sink. The dead algae build up on the horizontal surfaces of shipwrecks to such an extent that they collapse the wrecks. That's a concern for marine archaeology; lots of wrecks to investigate before they're damaged by the algae.

Would be nice if you could see deeper into the Kentucky River, but that might screw up the ecosystem. Probably already in the river anyway.

Mussels might be good at removing toxic stuff from the water and storing it in the shells.

Yeah, it would take mussels in every river and lake to make a dent, but it's something to consider.
 
2022-05-20 12:42:34 AM  

anuran: PartTimeBuddha: they're called trees

We passed the point where biomass could effectively remediate excess CO2 years ago.


It would be part of a multi-pronged effort. The issue would be water as you move west.

Planting industrial hemp in highway medians and highway edges would reduce the need to mow, and you'd have a lot of hemp at the end of the growing season. Hemp fiber for rope and fabric, hemp seed for animal feed, and hemp oil for paint or as biodiesel.
 
2022-05-20 12:51:54 AM  

Ivo Shandor: Encourage whales to fark and repopulate the oceans. They can support carbon-absorbing ecosystems by cycling nutrients from the deep up to the surface where they poop.


Seems like you could anchor some windmills in deep water, and drop a pipe into the depths. Use part of the electricity generated to pump deep water to the surface (or surface water down).

I thought about running 2 pipes from the Pacific to the Salton Sea. Use solar or wind to pump seawater into the Salton. As the water evaporates, the brine sinks. Capture that and pump it out far into the Pacific.

Also thought about boring tunnels from Australia's coast to the interior. Use solar to pump it up into shallow basins. The water evaporates, which might make the interior more hospitable to plant growth. Process the salt for human consumption.

The faster we transition to wind and solar, the better.
 
2022-05-20 12:55:40 AM  

Ivo Shandor: Deep-sea storage is an option.

https://www.technologyreview.com/2006/08/08/228472/storing-carbon-dioxide-under-the-ocean/


Mix it with methane to form deep-sea hydrates. Temp and pressure keeps it in solid form, and we eliminate 2 greenhouse gasses at once.
 
2022-05-20 4:07:01 AM  
A new tax is born......awwww isn't it cute, wait till it grows up.
 
2022-05-20 6:49:43 AM  
Can Bit Coins be used to pay for them?
 
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