Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Popular Science)   When Boeing first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said they were daft to build a spaceship in a swamp, but they built it just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So they built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So they built a third   (popsci.com) divider line
    More: Followup, International Space Station, Space Shuttle, aerospace company's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, supply missions, NASA's Commercial Crew program, Orbital Flight Test-2, current crew, first Starliner OFT mission  
•       •       •

1116 clicks; posted to STEM » on 19 May 2022 at 11:48 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-19 9:26:36 AM  
scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.netView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 11:54:33 AM  
The third one is expected to catch fire, fall over, THEN sink into the swamp
 
2022-05-19 11:54:47 AM  
It burned down, fell over, and then sank into the swamp. Will the fourth one go up?
 
2022-05-19 12:00:31 PM  
Article doesn't say when the launch is. Launch is set for 6:54 p.m. EDT today.
 
2022-05-19 12:28:12 PM  

Spectrum: Article doesn't say when the launch is. Launch is set for 6:54 p.m. EDT today.


 I'll believe it when debris from the failed launch is raining down on the pad.
 
2022-05-19 12:32:02 PM  
GEE GOSH POPSCI, THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE TIME OF LAUNCH!

🖕 🖕 🖕
 
2022-05-19 12:36:45 PM  
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/what-you-need-to-know-about-nasa-s-boeing-orbital-flight-test-2-0

Here, here is an actual source that won't babble half relevant muck.
 
2022-05-19 12:38:03 PM  
NASA's Boeing Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2) is targeting launch of the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at 6:54 p.m. EDT Thursday, May 19, from Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
 
2022-05-19 12:38:37 PM  
No I am not having a good morning.

Farking idiots.
 
2022-05-19 12:44:34 PM  
Are other people amused that SpaceX is almost done with their first delivery contract and the tested and true aerospace company - Boeing - with 66% more money hasn't even gotten a successful test of the unmanned version?

Who the fark puts aluminum in the path of an oxidizer?

How about them Russian rocket engines? What happened to the duplication program?
 
2022-05-19 1:05:36 PM  
I really hope the Atlas V performs perfectly.

On the other hand, if the Starliner spacecraft nosedives into the ocean I won't consider it any big loss.
 
2022-05-19 1:18:09 PM  

natazha: Are other people amused that SpaceX is almost done with their first delivery contract and the tested and true aerospace company - Boeing - with 66% more money hasn't even gotten a successful test of the unmanned version?

Who the fark puts aluminum in the path of an oxidizer?

How about them Russian rocket engines? What happened to the duplication program?


its fine, keep giving them more waivers and throwing more money at them.
its all fine
does anyone smell smoke?
 
2022-05-19 1:38:46 PM  

wage0048: I really hope the Atlas V performs perfectly.


Odds are good that it will, the Atlas V has proven to be one of the, if not the most reliable booster in the world. Zero loss of missions in 95 launch, and the one partial failure was a short burn and the NRO payload was able to burn and make the orbit. The only other thing even close to an issue was the AV-091 launch, in the (rare) 421 configuration, there was excessive vibration with the new version of the RL-10 engine (RL-10C-1-1) and they went back to the standard engine (the RL-10C-1) for the next few launches. The engine issue is odd because the current Delta IV second stage (the DCSS) uses this engine and has no issues with it.

AV-081 was a Starliner launch to make the ISS, the Atlas V delivered the Starlines to the correct orbit and velocity, but the Starliner itself had issues and aborted the rendezvous.

So, odds are good the booster will do the job. Shame it's going away, it's a great booster, but...the engines are RD-180s from Energomash and we can't trust Russia anymore.
 
2022-05-19 1:41:38 PM  
is no one at all in the US capable of back engineering the RD-180s???????
 
2022-05-19 1:47:17 PM  
"The parts falling off this Cost Plus boondoggle are of the finest Boeing lucre."
 
2022-05-19 2:13:50 PM  

Kittypie070: is no one at all in the US capable of back engineering the RD-180s???????


Capable?  Yes. I think that Rocketdyne even has the rights to do it. But a new rocket (Vulcan) with the BE-4 engine seemed like a better bet at the time.

Unfortunately for them the Vulcan is already a technical dead end. Like the Ariane 6 it'll be used for a while as a government launcher and then will be quietly dropped.
 
2022-05-19 2:15:34 PM  
On the one hand I want this to work because I like watching rockets lift off. On the other hand I want it to blow up because I like watching big explosions.
 
2022-05-19 2:21:04 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: "The parts falling off this Cost Plus boondoggle are of the finest Boeing lucre."


In this case they'll be falling off a fixed price boondoggle. Somehow everyone lost money here.  We'll the execs made money, but that's about it.
 
2022-05-19 2:27:11 PM  
Mean while SpaceX's Starship is grounded by the FAA. 👍😊👍
 
2022-05-19 4:51:44 PM  

pehvbot: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: "The parts falling off this Cost Plus boondoggle are of the finest Boeing lucre."

In this case they'll be falling off a fixed price boondoggle. Somehow everyone lost money here.  We'll the execs made money, but that's about it.


Boeing: can't even grift right anymore. #LowEnergy
 
2022-05-19 6:55:01 PM  
MEWW!!
 
2022-05-20 12:25:04 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: "The parts falling off this Cost Plus boondoggle are of the finest Boeing lucre."


Point of Order!

While $L$ was cost-plus, Starliner was fixed price.

That's why Boeing had to eat the cost of the reflight.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.