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(Deadline)   That's Doctor Taylor Swift to you   (deadline.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Grammy Award for Album of the Year, Academic dress, 11-time Grammy winner Taylor Swift, young adult, black Doctoral regalia, New York University's commencement ceremony, entire earth, honoris causa  
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1356 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 May 2022 at 8:50 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-19 6:19:44 AM  
no its becky
 
2022-05-19 6:47:44 AM  
Big whoop. I got my honorary doctorate and nobody made a thread for me.
 
2022-05-19 8:18:39 AM  
Not really. Honorary doctorates handed out to celebrities speaking at commencement is the equivalent of the university handing out a participation trophy
 
2022-05-19 8:52:57 AM  

syrynxx: no its becky


Dr Becky
 
2022-05-19 8:54:45 AM  
Ah yes, born rich, and made lots of money.  Let's give her an honorary doctorate.
 
2022-05-19 9:04:56 AM  
Honorary degrees are for publicity.  This one seems appropriate... especially given her practical experience that likely essentially qualifies her to lecture on multiple aspects of the music industry to a first or second-year class.
 
2022-05-19 9:05:13 AM  
The doctorate is in advanced microbiology, right?
 
2022-05-19 9:06:28 AM  
One good thing with universities in my state is they do not hand out honorary doctorates to visiting speakers. George Bush #1 spoke at a commencement at my alma mater when he was still in the oval office. There was a big stink at the time about how he was not given one.

I doubt he cared (was not going to pad the resume of a president). It was just a meaningless certificate to be placed in a file at his library after he left office.

I personally had three PhDs before I started my freshman year. I bought them out of the back of a magazine along with my Doctor of Holistic Medicine license and my Ministerial license. About $120 total. They are put away and only brought out when I want to freak out students who see me as the old bald custodian. I had a good career but the bogus diplomas never went on the resume.

If the young dancer/lip sync artist tries to use hers for credibility it will likely earn her more ridicule than respect.
 
2022-05-19 9:07:13 AM  

Marcos P: The doctorate is in advanced microbiology, right?


Psych. With a specialties in couples' counseling and substance abuse.
 
2022-05-19 9:09:48 AM  

stuhayes2010: Ah yes, born rich, and made lots of money.  Let's give her an honorary doctorate.


You'll get over it
 
2022-05-19 9:11:43 AM  
Taylor Swift was last seen putting on her gloves, and getting ready to provide free proctology examinations to her fans.
 
2022-05-19 9:13:37 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 9:15:08 AM  
People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.  It all started with "Dr." Bill Cosby.
 
2022-05-19 9:16:38 AM  

kbronsito: syrynxx: no its becky

Dr Becky


no1curr: Not really. Honorary doctorates handed out to celebrities speaking at commencement is the equivalent of the university handing out a participation trophy


So you're saying she's pseudoscientist?

Dr Becky - Pseudoscientist
Youtube p5p4OcUrCaE
 
2022-05-19 9:20:22 AM  

Wireless Joe: People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.  It all started with "Dr." Bill Cosby.


Does this happen often to you?  I have never met such a person, but i guarantee I'd laugh thinking they were joking.

And just like the meme, if they indicated they were serious, I'd laugh harder.
 
2022-05-19 9:20:24 AM  
Fun fact: Shaq has an ACTUAL Doctorate Degree.

Shaq Earns Doctorate Degree in Education in Fla.
Youtube RyO0JHSlN2k
 
2022-05-19 9:24:30 AM  
Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts
 
2022-05-19 9:34:48 AM  

ThomasPaineTrain: Big whoop. I got my honorary doctorate and nobody made a thread for me.


Fark user imageView Full Size


It helps if you look like this, and are worth millions of dollars.
 
2022-05-19 9:35:29 AM  

Gumball T Watterson: One good thing with universities in my state is they do not hand out honorary doctorates to visiting speakers. George Bush #1 spoke at a commencement at my alma mater when he was still in the oval office. There was a big stink at the time about how he was not given one.

I doubt he cared (was not going to pad the resume of a president). It was just a meaningless certificate to be placed in a file at his library after he left office.

I personally had three PhDs before I started my freshman year. I bought them out of the back of a magazine along with my Doctor of Holistic Medicine license and my Ministerial license. About $120 total. They are put away and only brought out when I want to freak out students who see me as the old bald custodian. I had a good career but the bogus diplomas never went on the resume.

If the young dancer/lip sync artist tries to use hers for credibility it will likely earn her more ridicule than respect.


I'm sure she doesn't need a fake PhD for credibility or respect
/did she pee in your cornflakes?
//and yes, i think she will sleep with me
 
2022-05-19 9:48:15 AM  
Just learn from Not-Dr.  Bill Cosby.   It is all well and good to just be given something you did not earn but something as simple as 35 or 36 little mistakes in your life and it can be taken away as easily as it was given to you.
 
2022-05-19 9:48:41 AM  

weirdneighbour: //and yes, i think she will sleep with me


You've got a pretty good shot, anyway.  According to her songs, she's already had sex with everyone else.

Just don't expect her to say nice things about you afterwards.

/not shaming, just sayin'.
 
2022-05-19 9:55:46 AM  
Back in the '90s, Regis Philbin was supposed to get an honorary degree at Notre Dame the day of my sister's graduation.
However, Notre Dame also invited Elizabeth Dole, who was also in the middle of her presidential campaign at the time.
She rolled her campaign speech right into her commencement address, and talked for an hour and a half.
Regis didn't get the chance to say anything at all.
You could see how passed he was from the cheap seats.
 
2022-05-19 10:02:43 AM  
Are you saying she's the new Doctor Who?  Because that would be awesome.
 
2022-05-19 10:04:50 AM  

Beerguy: Fun fact: Shaq has an ACTUAL Doctorate Degree.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/RyO0JHSlN2k]


Doesn't count.  Florida.
 
2022-05-19 10:05:45 AM  

Wireless Joe: People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.  It all started with "Dr." Bill Cosby.


Bill Cosby, creepy rapist asshole he is, actually earned an EdD at UMass. So him being Dr. Bill Cosby is legit.
 
2022-05-19 10:06:49 AM  

HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts



Has she published any original research?

Getting the kind of job that requires a doctorate typically requires proving that you've done something noteworthy, not just pointing to a box on a resume.  There's no real way around it, either, because you're competing against people who actually have made substantial discoveries and can point to those, typically in published journals.

You don't apply for jobs with your credentials; you apply with your CV.

Licensing wouldn't make sense, because academia is not a profession, and it's not about adhering to a set of standards and practices.

Law is.  Medicine is.  You have to do things a certain way to be a good physician, and there's risk if you don't.

Academics are supposed to be breaking new ground, not retreading old ground.  They care what new discoveries are out there to be made, not that a person perfectly masters someone else's ideas.

Even that is oversimplifying things, because the process of getting a real doctorate typically involves a battery of grueling exams covering foundational material before you're even allowed to start your doctoral research.

You take your qualifying exams, administered by people who know what they are doing, you pass, you do your research, you defend your dissertation before a committee of experts, and only then do you get your (real) doctorate.

It's not a license, but you still have to prove yourself.  In many ways, it's harder to obtain than a license, because you can't simply regurgitate others' ideas to pass an exam to get a doctorate.  You have to do your own thing, and it has to be good enough to impress your committee.

And that is the start of your career.  It's typically not even close enough to let you contend for a faculty job.  Most of those require spending time in postdoc research posts, meaning two to six more years of getting paid squat with no health insurance while working crazy hours and conducting more original research, all in hopes of having a chance at a stable career with an income that tops out around where you'd have started if you'd gone into industry instead.

Someone who hasn't gone through that entire process simply isn't going to be up to the task of trying to push the boundaries of human knowledge.  And contrary to what some people believe, this isn't just a matter of jargon obscuring problems (not in my field, anyway).  Often, the problems being worked on really are that complicated, and even just reading the literature requires a substantial amount of experience after years studying the foundations.

Honorary doctorates are meaningless because everybody knows that the recipients didn't go through any of that.

Someone with an honorary doctorate might go around insisting on being called "doctor," but such a person isn't exactly going to be competing for my job.  (I hit the middle ground of finding a research-oriented job in industry, so I get to solve fun problems while actually getting paid.)  The reason is that I actually have to know what I'm doing.

All those years of training aren't just a ritual.  They're how you actually get to the point of knowing what you're doing.

Those years in school and after school aren't just spent brownnosing someone to get ahead; they're spent reading.
 
2022-05-19 10:10:23 AM  

Gumball T Watterson: One good thing with universities in my state is they do not hand out honorary doctorates to visiting speakers. George Bush #1 spoke at a commencement at my alma mater when he was still in the oval office. There was a big stink at the time about how he was not given one.

I doubt he cared (was not going to pad the resume of a president). It was just a meaningless certificate to be placed in a file at his library after he left office.

I personally had three PhDs before I started my freshman year. I bought them out of the back of a magazine along with my Doctor of Holistic Medicine license and my Ministerial license. About $120 total. They are put away and only brought out when I want to freak out students who see me as the old bald custodian. I had a good career but the bogus diplomas never went on the resume.

If the young dancer/lip sync artist tries to use hers for credibility it will likely earn her more ridicule than respect.


Those degrees sound fun. I sometimes like to tell people how I went to Harvard (a small town in N. Ill. where I went to buy pot), was at Woodstock (another small town in Ill. where I went to buy pot) and worked at the University of Chicago Hospitals (where I took psych. patients for their outpatient medical appointments).
 
2022-05-19 10:18:41 AM  

NetOwl: HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts


Has she published any original research?

Getting the kind of job that requires a doctorate typically requires proving that you've done something noteworthy, not just pointing to a box on a resume.  There's no real way around it, either, because you're competing against people who actually have made substantial discoveries and can point to those, typically in published journals.

You don't apply for jobs with your credentials; you apply with your CV.

Licensing wouldn't make sense, because academia is not a profession, and it's not about adhering to a set of standards and practices.

Law is.  Medicine is.  You have to do things a certain way to be a good physician, and there's risk if you don't.

Academics are supposed to be breaking new ground, not retreading old ground.  They care what new discoveries are out there to be made, not that a person perfectly masters someone else's ideas.

Even that is oversimplifying things, because the process of getting a real doctorate typically involves a battery of grueling exams covering foundational material before you're even allowed to start your doctoral research.

You take your qualifying exams, administered by people who know what they are doing, you pass, you do your research, you defend your dissertation before a committee of experts, and only then do you get your (real) doctorate.

It's not a license, but you still have to prove yourself.  In many ways, ...


I don't think she's going to add this to her resume when she's applying for any work in the future.
 
2022-05-19 10:26:51 AM  

NetOwl: HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts


Has she published any original research?

Getting the kind of job that requires a doctorate typically requires proving that you've done something noteworthy, not just pointing to a box on a resume.  There's no real way around it, either, because you're competing against people who actually have made substantial discoveries and can point to those, typically in published journals.

You don't apply for jobs with your credentials; you apply with your CV.

Licensing wouldn't make sense, because academia is not a profession, and it's not about adhering to a set of standards and practices.

Law is.  Medicine is.  You have to do things a certain way to be a good physician, and there's risk if you don't.

Academics are supposed to be breaking new ground, not retreading old ground.  They care what new discoveries are out there to be made, not that a person perfectly masters someone else's ideas.

Even that is oversimplifying things, because the process of getting a real doctorate typically involves a battery of grueling exams covering foundational material before you're even allowed to start your doctoral research.

You take your qualifying exams, administered by people who know what they are doing, you pass, you do your research, you defend your dissertation before a committee of experts, and only then do you get your (real) doctorate.

It's not a license, but you still have to prove yourself.  In many ways, ...


Looks like my joke fell about as flat as my post-doctoral thesis on the duality of jargonesque expressionisticism in 16th century Slovenian literature exaggerating fertilizer use in cooperative butterfly farming for comedic effect.

I guess my grandparents were right after all (they didn't read my thesis either).
 
2022-05-19 10:41:48 AM  
It's the American equivalent of knighthoods for pop stars.  I'm not gonna follow some drug addict from the '60s into battle or anything.  It just means your sycophantic followers can feel smug calling you "Doctor" or "Sir".
 
2022-05-19 10:52:50 AM  
Much more interested in Nurse Taylor Swift.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 11:02:58 AM  

NetOwl: HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts


Has she published any original research?

Getting the kind of job that requires a doctorate typically requires proving that you've done something noteworthy, not just pointing to a box on a resume.  There's no real way around it, either, because you're competing against people who actually have made substantial discoveries and can point to those, typically in published journals.

You don't apply for jobs with your credentials; you apply with your CV.

Licensing wouldn't make sense, because academia is not a profession, and it's not about adhering to a set of standards and practices.

Law is.  Medicine is.  You have to do things a certain way to be a good physician, and there's risk if you don't.

Academics are supposed to be breaking new ground, not retreading old ground.  They care what new discoveries are out there to be made, not that a person perfectly masters someone else's ideas.

Even that is oversimplifying things, because the process of getting a real doctorate typically involves a battery of grueling exams covering foundational material before you're even allowed to start your doctoral research.

You take your qualifying exams, administered by people who know what they are doing, you pass, you do your research, you defend your dissertation before a committee of experts, and only then do you get your (real) doctorate.

It's not a license, but you still have to prove yourself.  In many ways, it's harder to obtain than a license, because you can't simply regurgitate others' ideas to pass an exam to get a doctorate.  You have to do your own thing, and it has to be good enough to impress your committee.

And that is the start of your career.  It's typically not even close enough to let you contend for a faculty job.  Most of those require spending time in postdoc research posts, meaning two to six more years of getting paid squat with no health insurance while working crazy hours and conducting more original research, all in hopes of having a chance at a stable career with an income that tops out around where you'd have started if you'd gone into industry instead.

Someone who hasn't gone through that entire process simply isn't going to be up to the task of trying to push the boundaries of human knowledge.  And contrary to what some people believe, this isn't just a matter of jargon obscuring problems (not in my field, anyway).  Often, the problems being worked on really are that complicated, and even just reading the literature requires a substantial amount of experience after years studying the foundations.

Honorary doctorates are meaningless because everybody knows that the recipients didn't go through any of that.

Someone with an honorary doctorate might go around insisting on being called "doctor," but such a person isn't exactly going to be competing for my job.  (I hit the middle ground of finding a research-oriented job in industry, so I get to solve fun problems while actually getting paid.)  The reason is that I actually have to know what I'm doing.

All those years of training aren't just a ritual.  They're how you actually get to the point of knowing what you're doing.

Those years in school and after school aren't just spent brownnosing someone to get ahead; they're spent reading.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 11:05:04 AM  

NetOwl: HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?

I guess you'd still need a license to practice in either case, but the practice of giving honorary PhDs makes me wonder if we shouldn't also require a license to perform academia. Sure, Taylor Swift has made great contributions to society - maybe more so than many actual academics, but she's done it without sealing herself off into an ivory tower of inscrutable language and opaque arguments. So she's not really walking the walk, is she? Has she really earned that degree?

/deep thoughts


Has she published any original research?

Getting the kind of job that requires a doctorate typically requires proving that you've done something noteworthy, not just pointing to a box on a resume.  There's no real way around it, either, because you're competing against people who actually have made substantial discoveries and can point to those, typically in published journals.

You don't apply for jobs with your credentials; you apply with your CV.

Licensing wouldn't make sense, because academia is not a profession, and it's not about adhering to a set of standards and practices.

Law is.  Medicine is.  You have to do things a certain way to be a good physician, and there's risk if you don't.

Academics are supposed to be breaking new ground, not retreading old ground.  They care what new discoveries are out there to be made, not that a person perfectly masters someone else's ideas.

Even that is oversimplifying things, because the process of getting a real doctorate typically involves a battery of grueling exams covering foundational material before you're even allowed to start your doctoral research.

You take your qualifying exams, administered by people who know what they are doing, you pass, you do your research, you defend your dissertation before a committee of experts, and only then do you get your (real) doctorate.

It's not a license, but you still have to prove yourself.  In many ways, ...


Looks like my joke fell about as flat as my post-doctoral thesis on the duality of jargonesque expressionisticism in 16th century Slovenian literature exaggerating fertilizer use in cooperative butterfly farming for comedic effect.

I guess my grandparents were right after all (they didn't read my thesis either).
the80sruled.comView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 11:05:37 AM  
"Listen, lady!"
"Doctor!"
"Doctor!"
"Doctor lady!"
 
mjg
2022-05-19 11:10:47 AM  
Poem from a NYU thread yesterday about the graduation and Swift's doctorate:

There's someone sitting in this crowd,
listening to Taylor Swift preach it loud,
You can be whoever you want to be,
watching her be given an honorary doctorate for free,
But in a few months they will see,
How big their bill from Navient will be,
And they'll cry out,
WHY - DIDN'T -- ANYONE - TELL - MEEEEEEEEEEE!
That $300k was a dumb amount to pay for a private uni liberal arts degree!
That my parents being upper middle class instead of poor would be bad for me!
That just because I got in to my dream university,
Doesn't mean that attending made any sense for me!
 
2022-05-19 11:27:07 AM  

NetOwl: And that is the start of your career. It's typically not even close enough to let you contend for a faculty job. Most of those require spending time in postdoc research posts, meaning two to six more years of getting paid squat with no health insurance while working crazy hours and conducting more original research, all in hopes of having a chance at a stable career with an income that tops out around where you'd have started if you'd gone into industry instead.


Average age researchers get their first R01 (typically required to be tenured):

Fark user imageView Full Size


Academia is AWESOME.
 
2022-05-19 11:30:32 AM  

Dimensio: "Listen, lady!"
"Doctor!"
"Doctor!"
"Doctor lady!"


No, me doctor, she nurse, you patient.
 
2022-05-19 11:34:28 AM  

Unsung_Hero: Honorary degrees are for publicity.  This one seems appropriate... especially given her practical experience that likely essentially qualifies her to lecture on multiple aspects of the music industry to a first or second-year class.


The first thing she will explain to them is how to be born one of the most naturally beautiful women in the world, and have a rich enough family to buy your way to a music career.
 
2022-05-19 12:01:58 PM  
Purrrrrr-fect
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 12:01:58 PM  

caljar: Unsung_Hero: Honorary degrees are for publicity.  This one seems appropriate... especially given her practical experience that likely essentially qualifies her to lecture on multiple aspects of the music industry to a first or second-year class.

The first thing she will explain to them is how to be born one of the most naturally beautiful women in the world, and have a rich enough family to buy your way to a music career.


I've said this before, but I know a beautiful woman from a rich, relatively famous family who desperately wanted to be a singer when she was younger. Right now she's selling real estate. She isn't even a bad singer. Connections and looks help, but if you think that's all it takes to become Taylor Swift successful you're living on another planet
 
2022-05-19 12:04:01 PM  

RyansPrivates: Wireless Joe: People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.  It all started with "Dr." Bill Cosby.

Bill Cosby, creepy rapist asshole he is, actually earned an EdD at UMass. So him being Dr. Bill Cosby is legit.


Right, but his honorary degree was in Coercive Sexual Pharmacology.
 
2022-05-19 12:50:36 PM  
I think universities giving out honorary doctorates is just an excuse to put a famous person in a silly costume.
 
2022-05-19 1:23:08 PM  

TDWCom29: caljar: Unsung_Hero: Honorary degrees are for publicity.  This one seems appropriate... especially given her practical experience that likely essentially qualifies her to lecture on multiple aspects of the music industry to a first or second-year class.

The first thing she will explain to them is how to be born one of the most naturally beautiful women in the world, and have a rich enough family to buy your way to a music career.

I've said this before, but I know a beautiful woman from a rich, relatively famous family who desperately wanted to be a singer when she was younger. Right now she's selling real estate. She isn't even a bad singer. Connections and looks help, but if you think that's all it takes to become Taylor Swift successful you're living on another planet


There's a reason why we're still listening to Taylor Swift songs and not Kim Kardashian, Lindsey Lohan, Hulk's daughter, Paris Hilton, Brie Larson, Heidi Montage or Emma Roberts.
 
2022-05-19 2:35:13 PM  

HighZoolander: Do medical schools ever give out honorary degrees? Do law schools?


They do, not very often but they do.

Example #1: An honorary law degree is called a Doctor in Laws; and Lehigh University awarded, and then revoked, a Doctor in Laws degree to this one irrelevant guy who ended up getting another Doctor in Laws degree as a consolation prize elsewhere.

Example #2: On the other hand, the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science (which I learned today is an actual thing) awarded not one but two Doctor of Medicine, honoris causa degrees last year. One of the recipients... well, you may have heard of him in passing.
 
2022-05-19 2:45:10 PM  

RyansPrivates: Wireless Joe: People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.  It all started with "Dr." Bill Cosby.

Bill Cosby, creepy rapist asshole he is, actually earned an EdD at UMass. So him being Dr. Bill Cosby is legit.


See also: Dr. Phil. He has two  Psychology degrees from the University of North Texas and he can legally call himself Dr. Phil McGraw all he wants.
 
2022-05-19 2:46:06 PM  
 
2022-05-19 3:01:42 PM  

Wireless Joe: People who have honorary degrees but are called/insist they be called "Dr." trigger me now.


I see your  "people who have honorary degrees" and present to you "people who legally add PhD to their legal names".

CSB Time:

When I worked at the telephone/virtual reference desk at my local library we had one of our regular not-very-bright patrons call to verify whether the Circulation Desk had updated his library record with his new name. I checked and the record was accurate: the record had been updated from "Joe Doe" to "Joe Doe, PhD".

I walked to the Circulation Desk later in the day to see what the deal was and to warn them about this guy. The Circulation Attendant told me that Mr. Doe had shown her both his driver's license and actual signed-sealed-and-delivered honest-to-goodness legal paperwork from the local Clerk of the Court showing that he had added the term "PhD" to his legal name.
 
2022-05-19 3:02:54 PM  

espiaboricua: Example #1: An honorary law degree is called a Doctor in Laws; and Lehigh University awarded, and then revoked, a Doctor in Laws degree to this one irrelevant guy who ended up getting another Doctor in Laws degree as a consolation prize elsewhere.


I think we can all be extremely grateful that a license is still required to practice law. Holy cow! I can't imagine the train wreck we dodged on that score.

Also, really, Liberty University? I didn't think your degrees could have been worth less. I'm unhappy to be wrong about that.
 
2022-05-19 3:54:58 PM  

caljar: Unsung_Hero: Honorary degrees are for publicity.  This one seems appropriate... especially given her practical experience that likely essentially qualifies her to lecture on multiple aspects of the music industry to a first or second-year class.

The first thing she will explain to them is how to be born one of the most naturally beautiful women in the world, and have a rich enough family to buy your way to a music career.


You forgot army of assistants
 
2022-05-19 4:15:36 PM  
media1.popsugar-assets.comView Full Size

Ugh, knees that could cut a diamond.
 
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