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(The Mainichi (Japan))   Subcommittee presents three proposals regarding acceptable range of unusual personal names. One is simply to allow Pikachu with any kanji. Another allows Pikachu as long as you have a good reason. The third says no Pikachu without acceptable kanji   (mainichi.jp) divider line
    More: Weird, Kanji, kanji names, phonetic characters, reading aids, Katakana, extent of the acceptable range of unusual names, panel of the Legislative Council of the Ministry, family registers of Japan  
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1150 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2022 at 8:04 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-18 8:05:00 PM  
Shocking.
 
2022-05-18 8:07:08 PM  
It be cool if I could just change my name to a number.  Names get racist reactions.
But. I guess a number would cause crap too
 
2022-05-18 8:13:34 PM  
Forget Pikachu, I've long dreamt of streamlining the English language in terms of spelling guidelines and grammar rules, or lack thereof.
 
2022-05-18 8:14:45 PM  
How about X Æ A-Xii?
 
2022-05-18 8:16:43 PM  
Sweet Jebus, the whole "kira-kira" names mess...

Japanese surnames are not that difficult, but given names can written and read almost any way you want. You know the Monty Python bit about the guy with the name "Raymond Luxury Yacht" pronounced as "Throatwobbler Mangrove"? Yeah, it's that bad.

Some real ones:

月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

My experience is that far more girls than boys get stuck with these things.
 
2022-05-18 8:17:12 PM  
I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."
 
2022-05-18 8:20:16 PM  

Resident Muslim: Forget Pikachu, I've long dreamt of streamlining the English language in terms of spelling guidelines and grammar rules, or lack thereof.


English is a victim of its own success here, as it is simply too widely spoken in too many countries to ever undergo a spelling reform.

If a language is concentrated largely within a single polity, reform can happen: the use of ß in German, for example, or the "simplification" of Chinese on the mainland.
 
2022-05-18 8:20:37 PM  

aagrajag: Sweet Jebus, the whole "kira-kira" names mess...


Proper use of kira-kira...

My Bride is a Mermaid Romantic Summer Full OP
Youtube vRgpr7HLa_c
 
2022-05-18 8:21:29 PM  

aagrajag: Japanese surnames are not that difficult, but given names can written and read almost any way you want. You know the Monty Python bit about the guy with the name "Raymond Luxury Yacht" pronounced as "Throatwobbler Mangrove"? Yeah, it's that bad.


I'm particularly fond of LittleBirdsPlaying, aka Takanashi.
 
2022-05-18 8:24:49 PM  

aagrajag: Sweet Jebus, the whole "kira-kira" names mess...

Japanese surnames are not that difficult, but given names can written and read almost any way you want. You know the Monty Python bit about the guy with the name "Raymond Luxury Yacht" pronounced as "Throatwobbler Mangrove"? Yeah, it's that bad.

Some real ones:

月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

My experience is that far more girls than boys get stuck with these things.


Rinda-rinda is the nonsense name I always heard at karaoke.
 
2022-05-18 8:25:23 PM  

Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."


熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.
 
2022-05-18 8:27:03 PM  

aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.


Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations
 
2022-05-18 8:29:51 PM  

Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations


That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.
 
2022-05-18 8:31:17 PM  

aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations

That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.


You have successfully filled me with longing to return to kansai. *sigh*
 
2022-05-18 8:32:46 PM  

Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations

That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.

You have successfully filled me with longing to return to kansai. *sigh*


Kansai is a fun area.

You said you were there just a year. Studying abroad? Working holiday?
 
2022-05-18 8:49:46 PM  
There's so many languages and countries in the world, and yet it had to be the one with such a confusing language that figured out how to make good video games. You ever think about that? It's pretty unfair if you ask me.
 
2022-05-18 8:53:44 PM  

aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations

That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.

You have successfully filled me with longing to return to kansai. *sigh*

Kansai is a fun area.

You said you were there just a year. Studying abroad? Working holiday?


Ryugakusei deshiata!

I was in Kyoto at kyosandai, 2008 - 2009.

Should have married koizumi-chan and stayed. 😭
 
2022-05-18 8:57:54 PM  

God-is-a-Taco: There's so many languages and countries in the world, and yet it had to be the one with such a confusing language that figured out how to make good video games. You ever think about that? It's pretty unfair if you ask me.


Tell me about it... That's basically why I first got into translation: hated waiting for my favourite games to get translated (if they would ever receive a translation at all).
 
2022-05-18 9:00:22 PM  

God-is-a-Taco: There's so many languages and countries in the world, and yet it had to be the one with such a confusing language that figured out how to make good video games. You ever think about that? It's pretty unfair if you ask me.


My theory about why the language is so confusing: terrible food.

See, back in the day, the islanders were periodically invaded  by the mainlanders, each time gaining some new words and grammar. But the mainlanders always disliked the food and eventually left.

At some point, the islanders and their terrible food were left alone with their extra language bits and trees and started thinking "Hey, we could go invade somebody, too. They probably have good food."

Thus began the great expansion. They sent ships everywhere, returning with spoils of spices, recipes, and new language bits.

It spiraled out of control. Now there's so many competing root languages not even native speakers agree how to conjugate common verbs or write common words.

Dollars to doughnuts/donuts, that's why English be so weird.
 
2022-05-18 9:05:19 PM  
English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.
 
2022-05-18 9:10:55 PM  

aagrajag: Sweet Jebus, the whole "kira-kira" names mess...

Japanese surnames are not that difficult, but given names can written and read almost any way you want. You know the Monty Python bit about the guy with the name "Raymond Luxury Yacht" pronounced as "Throatwobbler Mangrove"? Yeah, it's that bad.

Some real ones:

月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

My experience is that far more girls than boys get stuck with these things.


Yeah a guy I went to school with went off on this one once.  He was Japanese, his parents immigrated when he was like 4 but they tended to spend the school year here in the U.S. and the summer back in Japan.  He was about half of each culture as you can find.  He had a 15 minute absolute rant that was the Japanese version of Gallagher's spelling/language sketch.  We were friggin' dying laughing - and every bit of it was true

/comb pronounced coam.  Tomb - tome?  No!  Toom
//all expies of that kind of thing with Japanese words in context
///because I have nearly zero Japanese I can't remember the actual content, but I was laughing so hard it hurt and so were 5 or 6 other people
 
2022-05-18 9:18:21 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-18 9:20:44 PM  
aagrajag:
Tell me about it... That's basically why I first got into translation: hated waiting for my favourite games to get translated (if they would ever receive a translation at all).

Hah! Yeah, I really wanted to play Bahamut Lagoon* and all the other Japanese stuff back then, but I was way too lazy.  It doesn't bother me too much these days, as 'cool Japan' has been such a monumental success the past couple decades that you can reasonably rely on fan translations for most stuff now if some Western corporation hasn't sliced up a Japanese studio for themselves.

*received a translation patch back in 2002
 
2022-05-18 9:20:53 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.


English has more guys under the trench coat, but Japanese is worse despite being basically just two: Japanese and Chinese. The reason is that those two languages are radically different in terms of even basic grammar, and while Japanese did an amazingly-clever job of grafting on the Chinese characters as a writing system, the resulting complexity is insane.

A single character can possibly have a dozen different readings. Other common words might have half-a-dozen representations. Still others take different pronunciations depending on both grammatical and cultural context.

Examples:

生: common readings are sei, shou, nama, and with inflections, also ikiru, ikasu, haeru, hayasu, umu, umareru, ou, musu (a rare verb meaning "to grow", specifically of moss), and in proper names there are a dozen more.

"Sushi", usually written as 寿司 can also be written as 鮨, 鮓 or 壽司 for a more old-time flavour.

The word 利益 (benefit, profit, gain) is usually read as "rieki" but when referring to the benefits of the Buddha's teachings, "riyaku".

The common verb "toru" (to take) can be written with at least nine different characters, depending on context and nuance. Just a few of those: 取盗摂執獲

It's fun, but one hell of a learning curve.
 
2022-05-18 9:21:42 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: aagrajag: Sweet Jebus, the whole "kira-kira" names mess...

Japanese surnames are not that difficult, but given names can written and read almost any way you want. You know the Monty Python bit about the guy with the name "Raymond Luxury Yacht" pronounced as "Throatwobbler Mangrove"? Yeah, it's that bad.

Some real ones:

月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

My experience is that far more girls than boys get stuck with these things.

Yeah a guy I went to school with went off on this one once.  He was Japanese, his parents immigrated when he was like 4 but they tended to spend the school year here in the U.S. and the summer back in Japan.  He was about half of each culture as you can find.  He had a 15 minute absolute rant that was the Japanese version of Gallagher's spelling/language sketch.  We were friggin' dying laughing - and every bit of it was true

/comb pronounced coam.  Tomb - tome?  No!  Toom
//all expies of that kind of thing with Japanese words in context
///because I have nearly zero Japanese I can't remember the actual content, but I was laughing so hard it hurt and so were 5 or 6 other people


I would pay good money to hear that rant.
 
2022-05-18 9:22:37 PM  

aagrajag: 月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")


...wait. Those are completely different meanings.

Japanes words don't mutate by minor spelling differences (and so can be traced back to root words), but instead completely change their meaning over a short period of time?

As a computer programmer I abhor that.
 
2022-05-18 9:23:21 PM  

God-is-a-Taco: aagrajag:
Tell me about it... That's basically why I first got into translation: hated waiting for my favourite games to get translated (if they would ever receive a translation at all).

Hah! Yeah, I really wanted to play Bahamut Lagoon* and all the other Japanese stuff back then, but I was way too lazy.  It doesn't bother me too much these days, as 'cool Japan' has been such a monumental success the past couple decades that you can reasonably rely on fan translations for most stuff now if some Western corporation hasn't sliced up a Japanese studio for themselves.

*received a translation patch back in 2002


Sometimes the fan translations are downright superior to the official ones.
 
2022-05-18 9:24:44 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-18 9:25:58 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.


I disagree. Japanese has like... two? irregular verbs and a special alphabet for phonetics and a second special alphabet specifically for loan words. Japanese is very much one language, but with a giant sack of stolen writing systems.

Verbally, English is a bunch of languages all Frankensteined together, but written there's only a tiny handful letters to do all the work, like that Australian guy in the mine in Futurama.
 
2022-05-18 9:30:03 PM  

Danack: aagrajag: 月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

...wait. Those are completely different meanings.

Japanes words don't mutate by minor spelling differences (and so can be traced back to root words), but instead completely change their meaning over a short period of time?

As a computer programmer I abhor that.


It's more like multiple meanings can easily accrete onto a single character, and Chinese itself has a very loose concept of this "part of speech" thing: a single character can be a noun, a verb, and a grammatical conjunction. Example: the "shō" in "shōgun" 将 can mean "leader/general", "to lead", or "about to happen/do".

Then there's the fact that Japanese inflects its verbs and adjectives, whereas Chinese does not inflect at all.
 
2022-05-18 9:34:03 PM  

leeksfromchichis: The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.

I disagree. Japanese has like... two? irregular verbs and a special alphabet for phonetics and a second special alphabet specifically for loan words. Japanese is very much one language, but with a giant sack of stolen writing systems.

Verbally, English is a bunch of languages all Frankensteined together, but written there's only a tiny handful letters to do all the work, like that Australian guy in the mine in Futurama.


Two irregular verbs in modern grammar, but literary has nine. If you include the auxiliary verbs, their weird conjugations bumps up the number to around fifteen.

At least the conjugations patterns are highly regular, in general. Could be much worse, like French, which requires an entire separate reference, a "bescherelle" for verb conjugations alone.
 
2022-05-18 9:45:11 PM  
Kanji are a joke. I mean, the way Japanese uses Chinese characters doesn't even pass for a bad joke, there are a TON of ateji where the characters have no relationship to the word. The naming commission should allow it all because the language itself does.

Just a couple here: 向日葵 "himawari" (sunflower). That's directly stolen from Chinese and the damn characters don't match at all - the order is wrong and there is a character in there for grass that has no connection to the native word. お土産 is "omiyage" (souvenir). Nope, no phonetic relation to any standard reading of the characters.

Make reading characters (furigana) required on official documents. Since everyone has to use kanji all the time anyway, let's work around it in knowing that the system is arbitrary and dumb rather than trying to force sense it.

Things like using katakana for biological names - like the words for cherry tree or dolphin - are helpful reforms that are already taking hold somewhat.
 
2022-05-18 9:45:33 PM  

Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations

That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.

You have successfully filled me with longing to return to kansai. *sigh*


I am mostly missing sugoi kirei kumo at kokuritsu tenmondai (subaru boenkyou)
 
2022-05-18 9:46:05 PM  

aagrajag: leeksfromchichis: The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.

I disagree. Japanese has like... two? irregular verbs and a special alphabet for phonetics and a second special alphabet specifically for loan words. Japanese is very much one language, but with a giant sack of stolen writing systems.

Verbally, English is a bunch of languages all Frankensteined together, but written there's only a tiny handful letters to do all the work, like that Australian guy in the mine in Futurama.

Two irregular verbs in modern grammar, but literary has nine. If you include the auxiliary verbs, their weird conjugations bumps up the number to around fifteen.

At least the conjugations patterns are highly regular, in general. Could be much worse, like French, which requires an entire separate reference, a "bescherelle" for verb conjugations alone.


English has seventeen irregular verbs before breakfast, although it's already had lunch.
 
2022-05-18 9:56:31 PM  

adamatari: Kanji are a joke. I mean, the way Japanese uses Chinese characters doesn't even pass for a bad joke, there are a TON of ateji where the characters have no relationship to the word. The naming commission should allow it all because the language itself does.

Just a couple here: 向日葵 "himawari" (sunflower). That's directly stolen from Chinese and the damn characters don't match at all - the order is wrong and there is a character in there for grass that has no connection to the native word. お土産 is "omiyage" (souvenir). Nope, no phonetic relation to any standard reading of the characters.

Make reading characters (furigana) required on official documents. Since everyone has to use kanji all the time anyway, let's work around it in knowing that the system is arbitrary and dumb rather than trying to force sense it.

Things like using katakana for biological names - like the words for cherry tree or dolphin - are helpful reforms that are already taking hold somewhat.


Himawari is a great example to illustrate the grammatical problem of where to stick the verb. Chinese places it before the noun as you've noted here, while Japanese places it after.

And yeah, ateji are monstrous things, but they often do supply extra meaning which would not be apparent when represented by only phonetic characters.

I had to learn thousands of those bastards for my kanji test, and they still boned me on two of them:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Upper-right. I got the first eight, but missed nine and ten. 戎克 is ジャンク, "junk", you know, a Chinese-style sailboat. The word is Portuguese, I think. Never saw that SOB before in my life.
 
2022-05-18 9:57:11 PM  

leeksfromchichis: aagrajag: leeksfromchichis: The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.

I disagree. Japanese has like... two? irregular verbs and a special alphabet for phonetics and a second special alphabet specifically for loan words. Japanese is very much one language, but with a giant sack of stolen writing systems.

Verbally, English is a bunch of languages all Frankensteined together, but written there's only a tiny handful letters to do all the work, like that Australian guy in the mine in Futurama.

Two irregular verbs in modern grammar, but literary has nine. If you include the auxiliary verbs, their weird conjugations bumps up the number to around fifteen.

At least the conjugations patterns are highly regular, in general. Could be much worse, like French, which requires an entire separate reference, a "bescherelle" for verb conjugations alone.

English has seventeen irregular verbs before breakfast, although it's already had lunch.


English irregulars are much worse, no argument there.
 
2022-05-18 9:57:55 PM  

waxbeans: It be cool if I could just change my name to a number.  Names get racist reactions.
But. I guess a number would cause crap too


How about "Seven"?
 
2022-05-18 10:06:27 PM  

aagrajag: leeksfromchichis: aagrajag: leeksfromchichis: The Irresponsible Captain: English and Japanese may have their own takes but they're both several languages in a trench coat pretending to be one.

I disagree. Japanese has like... two? irregular verbs and a special alphabet for phonetics and a second special alphabet specifically for loan words. Japanese is very much one language, but with a giant sack of stolen writing systems.

Verbally, English is a bunch of languages all Frankensteined together, but written there's only a tiny handful letters to do all the work, like that Australian guy in the mine in Futurama.

Two irregular verbs in modern grammar, but literary has nine. If you include the auxiliary verbs, their weird conjugations bumps up the number to around fifteen.

At least the conjugations patterns are highly regular, in general. Could be much worse, like French, which requires an entire separate reference, a "bescherelle" for verb conjugations alone.

English has seventeen irregular verbs before breakfast, although it's already had lunch.

English irregulars are much worse, no argument there.


All because mum boiled one too many cabbages for some bloke and he went absolutely mental and just sailed west till he hit America, pulled out a gun, and said, "Alright, where's your bloody food!?" and it started a trend.
 
2022-05-18 10:12:18 PM  
My penis's middle name is Pikachu.
 
2022-05-18 10:16:54 PM  

Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."


Say that three times!

/obscure?
 
2022-05-18 10:24:40 PM  

Ragin' Asian: My penis's middle name is Pikachu.


mine's Eurethra.
 
2022-05-18 11:40:46 PM  

Danack: aagrajag: 月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

...wait. Those are completely different meanings.

Japanes words don't mutate by minor spelling differences (and so can be traced back to root words), but instead completely change their meaning over a short period of time?

As a computer programmer I abhor that.


It actually gets worse. Chinese use the exact same kanji but have entirely different pronunciations. So you can read their signs if you know your kanji but you can't actually speak to passing chinese people about what you're reading.
 
2022-05-18 11:58:45 PM  

Bandito King: Danack: aagrajag: 月: Moon, usually read as "tsuki", "getsu" or "gatsu", but meant to be read as "Runa" ("Luna")

愛猫: Pet cat, literally "beloved cat", usually read as "aibyou" but meant to be read here as "Kittii" ("Kitty")

...wait. Those are completely different meanings.

Japanes words don't mutate by minor spelling differences (and so can be traced back to root words), but instead completely change their meaning over a short period of time?

As a computer programmer I abhor that.

It actually gets worse. Chinese use the exact same kanji but have entirely different pronunciations. So you can read their signs if you know your kanji but you can't actually speak to passing chinese people about what you're reading.


Unless those signs are written in "simplified" crap. Often, if you know the trad character, you can recognise the simplified version, but not always.

蘭 is the trad character for "orchid", but would you recognise 兰 as the same thing? Or 业 for 業? Or one of the worst: 龙 instead of 龍?

Then there's that mess they created by collapsing multiple characters into one, like 干 instead of 乾, but that at least provides amusing sh*t like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


I'm not saying Japanese is blameless here, though. They collapsed 辨辯 and 瓣 all into 弁.
 
2022-05-19 12:04:29 AM  

waxbeans: It be cool if I could just change my name to a number.  Names get racist reactions.
But. I guess a number would cause crap too


How about "-a".  Pronounced Dasha.
 
2022-05-19 12:07:31 AM  

mrshowrules: waxbeans: It be cool if I could just change my name to a number.  Names get racist reactions.
But. I guess a number would cause crap too

How about "-a".  Pronounced Dasha.


Ah, the "dash don't be silent" urban legend. That one's been floating around for decades now. Hell, it might even be true at this post.
 
2022-05-19 6:23:54 AM  
This is the sort of shiat that made me quit learning Japanese and stick with the easy language I was studying... Mandarin.

Then I decided to learn Hokkien/Taiwanese. Yay, 7 tones...or 8 depending on your dialect. And virtually all the tones change in context (known as tone sandhi). Mandarin has this a little bit... if you say a phrase with two 3rd tones, the first one changes to a 2nd tone. Meanwhile, Taiwanese says "hold my beh-á-chíu" (beer) These are the tone change rules:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2022-05-19 9:38:27 AM  

dbirchall: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: aagrajag: Bandito King: I signed everything with the kanji for "bear" the entire year I lived in japan.

Bank manager: "Kuma?!"
Me: "Hai, so desu."

熊谷 (Kumagai) is a pretty common name where I live, and a good illustration of how obnoxious Japanese name readings can be. 谷 is not read as "gai" anywhere else, to my knowledge, only "tani", "ya", and "koku", or extremely rarely as "yoku" or "roku". "Gai" is the voiced form of "kai" (an archaic word meaning narrow valley) normally written as 峡 when encountered at all.

Hahaha I actually used Kuma Genki for reservations

That's awesome.

I usually use 隼本 (read as "hayamoto") when I need to use a Japanese-style name, partly because it's a good translation of my wife's surname, but also because it sounds like a traditional Japanese name without actually being one.

You have successfully filled me with longing to return to kansai. *sigh*

I am mostly missing sugoi kirei kumo at kokuritsu tenmondai (subaru boenkyou)


If I get to retire to anywhere on Earth, it's going to be Takarazuka.
 
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