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(Yahoo)   "Future COVID variants will likely reinfect us multiple times a year, experts say - unless we invest in new vaccines." I mean, I'd like to, but... Season Three of Squid Game isn't gonna watch itself, so   (yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Sick, Immune system, Vaccination, Greek alphabet of new variants, original COVID-19 vaccines, initial version of Omicron, booster shot, threat of more serious outcomes, new sublineages  
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251 clicks; posted to STEM » on 18 May 2022 at 2:55 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-18 12:02:30 AM  
Tax cuts for the wealthy aren't going to pay for themselves...
 
2022-05-18 3:10:50 AM  
Remember early on when COVID-19 first showed up in the US, and we all hunkered down to avoid catching or spreading the virus, and how some people decided that having "covid parties" and hanging out with relatives was really important, and then we'd see a spike in the weeks following every major or minor holiday?

Good times. LOL. What a bunch of rubes we were for trying to stay home while those people were out there spreading the disease.
 
2022-05-18 3:18:14 AM  
I don't know what variant I got, but its bad enough I'll be good and scared until I'm clear of it.

Get another booster if you can. Keep masking (I did not, and I'm sure this contributed to my viral load).
 
2022-05-18 4:06:36 AM  
"Needless to say, getting infected multiple times a year with a virus that has the potential to cause a host of other health problems - including "long COVID" in roughly 10% of those it infects - is not optimal."

That's one way to staggeringly understate it.

Scary that it's turning out China was right to maintain its deathgrip on zero covid even as the defenders of stonks pilloried it because of the short term damage to stonks.

/wears an N95 in all public buildings at all times
//only exception is inside my private office with the door closed
 
2022-05-18 5:00:52 AM  
For those of you that think 10% of longterm complications isn't that bad a risk

You know polio?

What we THINK of when we think of Polio (paralysis, etc)?

That was 0.5% of all poliovirus infections.
 
2022-05-18 5:44:04 AM  
It's probably going to be a never-ending struggle, at least as long as the bullshiat politics around it remains as is. There's no evidence that there's any kind of continuous other species -> human vector keeping it spreading, so a worldwide effort to distribute a vaccine could probably eradicate the disease... but when the wealthiest nation in the world has 1 out of 4 citizens refusing to take said vaccine, and a whole bunch of other countries have the same problem on a lesser scale, even when it's not only free, but there's a clinic super close by? Yeah, it's not going away unless we get super lucky and it mutates into something basically harmless.

The rest of us are just going to have to keep our shots current, keep masking in crowded indoor places, and hope we're not one of the unlucky ones that gets long covid in spite of doing both. Hopefully it'll eventually get contained enough that large-scale social events can actually be a reliable thing again, but that's probably only going to happen once there's a reliable long-term plan for dealing with the idiots, and we're not there yet.
 
2022-05-18 6:19:26 AM  

Felgraf: For those of you that think 10% of longterm complications isn't that bad a risk

You know polio?

What we THINK of when we think of Polio (paralysis, etc)?

That was 0.5% of all poliovirus infections.


Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.
 
2022-05-18 6:27:28 AM  

DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.


https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.
 
2022-05-18 6:45:02 AM  

trerro: DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.


I'm not saying people should ignore it, but conflating "10% will get long covid!" which includes "will be tired for a month" with "polio was only 0.5%!" is very, very, very disingenuous.

The longest long covid on record is 16 months. This is not on the same level as permanent disfigurements from polio.
 
2022-05-18 6:54:35 AM  

DerAppie: trerro: DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.

I'm not saying people should ignore it, but conflating "10% will get long covid!" which includes "will be tired for a month" with "polio was only 0.5%!" is very, very, very disingenuous.

The longest long covid on record is 16 months. This is not on the same level as permanent disfigurements from polio.


This?
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-61173945

That's not what most people talk about when they talk about 'long covid'. That's someone who had a 16 month covid infection.

(They died, BTW).

Otherwise I can't seem to find your 'longest long covid' stat.
 
2022-05-18 7:18:20 AM  

Felgraf: DerAppie: trerro: DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.

I'm not saying people should ignore it, but conflating "10% will get long covid!" which includes "will be tired for a month" with "polio was only 0.5%!" is very, very, very disingenuous.

The longest long covid on record is 16 months. This is not on the same level as permanent disfigurements from polio.

This?
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-61173945

That's not what most people talk about when they talk about 'long covid'. That's someone who had a 16 month covid infection.

(They died, BTW).

Otherwise I can't seem to find your 'longest long covid' stat.


No I had something from bloomberg, I went to grab the article and saw I misinterpreted it. They're talking about the same case but called it long covid.

But that still doesn't change the point I put forth though. All official statements I find about it say "weeks to months," with no mention of "but can last for multiple years or even forever," and the severity is also completely disparate to put 10% of long covid and 0.5% polio next to each other as if they can be compared without any further context.
 
2022-05-18 8:51:23 AM  
The vaccine discourages damage accrued during remediative immune action, but doesn't do fark all to discourage damage accrued from viral replication, which progresses effectively unimpeded w/Omicron variants.  Breakthroughs still suffer massive brain and cardiovascular damage each and every time they are infected.  Kidney and insulin producing cell damage too.  We will respond to this threat effectively and efficiently, or be pruned down to a population size small enough to develop migratory behaviors that don't sustain global transmission.

That's assuming that it doesn't prove to be nearly 100% fatal in the long term.  There's way too much of this stuff sticking around after seroconversion, and the signaling the residual virus produces is definitively carcinogenic, so we'll see.  Definitely going to be at least as oncogenic as EBV, might be as bad as HIV.

Y'all farked around and chose least effort strategies and y'all are going to find out.
 
2022-05-18 9:04:34 AM  
I know the stuff I see on Twitter is anecdotal and cannot indicate prevalence, but there are people talking about the long covid they got in March 2020, and how it still limits them. Then there are some more who were improving, but their kids brought covid home again, so they're back at square one. To my untrained eye, it looks like they're merging into (or becoming?) the ME/CFS crowd, which is medically easy to ignore because they don't get out much.
 
2022-05-18 9:37:00 AM  
Is it even possible for a vaccine to operate from inside every kind of ACE2-bearing cell? Because that's what's required now with omicron since it goes inside the cell it infects. That's the  "immune evasion" mechanism you hear about, it's currently untouchable once it forms the endosome.

God help us if it moves on to favor filopodia transmission in earnest like delta, that's something I'd put money on for 100% mortality. Once the first cell is infected it just stabs the neighboring cells, and just keeps going on and on and on and your immune system would be none the wiser.
 
2022-05-18 2:16:24 PM  

DerAppie: Felgraf: DerAppie: trerro: DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.

I'm not saying people should ignore it, but conflating "10% will get long covid!" which includes "will be tired for a month" with "polio was only 0.5%!" is very, very, very disingenuous.

The longest long covid on record is 16 months. This is not on the same level as permanent disfigurements from polio.

This?
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-61173945

That's not what most people talk about when they talk about 'long covid'. That's someone who had a 16 month covid infection.

(They died, BTW).

Otherwise I can't seem to find your 'longest long covid' stat.

No I had something from bloomberg, I went to grab the article and saw I misinterpreted it. They're talking about the same case but called it long covid.

But that still doesn't change the point I put forth though. All official statements I find about it say "weeks to months," with no mention of "but can last for multiple years or even forever," and the severity is also completely disparate to put 10% of long covid and 0.5% polio next to each other as if they can be compared without any further context.


COVID hasn't existed long enough for us to put an upper bound on how long the effects can last. Some fraction of it will probably be "forever" but there's very little actual data beyond 2 years.
 
2022-05-19 2:06:53 PM  

Ivo Shandor: DerAppie: Felgraf: DerAppie: trerro: DerAppie: Polio complications were a life long issue though. Almost all "long covid" cases clear up after a few months.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

"Most" recover after a few months. Even if 95% do (and "most" is usually a lower percentage than 95), that would still only be enough to lower the 10% long-haul rate down to polio's 0.5%, not below it.

It's unknown if there actually is an upper limit on how long some of the lingering symptoms last, and it's also been known to cause diabetes, which very rarely goes away once you have it. So yeah, it may not be a "thousands of people in iron lungs"-level issue, but it's not something to ignore either.

I'm not saying people should ignore it, but conflating "10% will get long covid!" which includes "will be tired for a month" with "polio was only 0.5%!" is very, very, very disingenuous.

The longest long covid on record is 16 months. This is not on the same level as permanent disfigurements from polio.

This?
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-61173945

That's not what most people talk about when they talk about 'long covid'. That's someone who had a 16 month covid infection.

(They died, BTW).

Otherwise I can't seem to find your 'longest long covid' stat.

No I had something from bloomberg, I went to grab the article and saw I misinterpreted it. They're talking about the same case but called it long covid.

But that still doesn't change the point I put forth though. All official statements I find about it say "weeks to months," with no mention of "but can last for multiple years or even forever," and the severity is also completely disparate to put 10% of long covid and 0.5% polio next to each other as if they can be compared without any further context.

COVID hasn't existed long enough for us to put an upper bound on how long the effects can last. Some fraction of it will probably be "forever" but there's very little actual data beyond 2 years.


To note:  pandemics historically last 4 years on average.  America kidding itself lasts forever.  Still.
 
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