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(YouTube)   Original Top Gun sequel was done in the 80s. By F-14 crews. "Pop Gun"   (youtube.com) divider line
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609 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 17 May 2022 at 12:50 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-17 1:04:39 PM  
Okay, the guy riding around like a doofus on a comically small bike was pretty funny.
 
2022-05-17 1:06:39 PM  
I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?
 
2022-05-17 1:13:03 PM  

WoodyHayes: Okay, the guy riding around like a doofus on a comically small bike was pretty funny.


The guy kicking the wrenches into a hole on the FOD walk did it for me.
 
2022-05-17 1:16:34 PM  

Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?


I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.
 
2022-05-17 1:30:06 PM  

WoodyHayes: I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.


I was thinking it had to be something along those lines. Thanks for the explanation.
 
2022-05-17 2:00:56 PM  
I thought the original Top Gun sequel was Tomcat Alley

Tomcat Alley PC - remastered HD-Movie Tour 60FPS!!!
Youtube 4oGfdAYJW74
 
2022-05-17 2:02:06 PM  

WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.



FOD.
 
2022-05-17 2:12:39 PM  
Top Gun Final Scene Remake
Youtube TX1sgZVGBUw
 
2022-05-17 2:18:02 PM  

WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.


FOD walk, Foreign Object Debris. The "holes" he's kicking them into are tie-down points, for use when the wind is up and you want a plane to stay where you put it.
 
2022-05-17 2:27:23 PM  

Where wolf: WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.

FOD walk, Foreign Object Debris. The "holes" he's kicking them into are tie-down points, for use when the wind is up and you want a plane to stay where you put it.


I think the D in FOD is for "damage"
Yep tie down points.  Also for securing the plane on a moving flight deck.
 
2022-05-17 2:39:04 PM  

johnny_vegas: Where wolf: WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.

FOD walk, Foreign Object Debris. The "holes" he's kicking them into are tie-down points, for use when the wind is up and you want a plane to stay where you put it.

I think the D in FOD is for "damage"
Yep tie down points.  Also for securing the plane on a moving flight deck.


I thought so as well, as I have heard both in my career, so I did the google before I posted.  You're searching for debris, though one could make the argument that if you don't find the random tools on the flightline, you'll be repairing foreign object damage.
 
2022-05-17 2:46:58 PM  

Where wolf: johnny_vegas: Where wolf: WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.

FOD walk, Foreign Object Debris. The "holes" he's kicking them into are tie-down points, for use when the wind is up and you want a plane to stay where you put it.

I think the D in FOD is for "damage"
Yep tie down points.  Also for securing the plane on a moving flight deck.

I thought so as well, as I have heard both in my career, so I did the google before I posted.  You're searching for debris, though one could make the argument that if you don't find the random tools on the flightline, you'll be repairing foreign object damage.


Interesting!  Looks like both terms are in use.
 
2022-05-17 2:56:04 PM  
The fact that the tools are there to be kicked is a dig at their maintainers, too.  In my experience, aircraft maintainers are required to track their tools very closely; their toolboxes are signed out for and back in after every shift and checked to ensure all tools are present.  Sometimes tools are engraved with their toolbox number.  Some places even make you re-sign tools out to yourself if you want to take a tool bag and a subset of tools to go do a job instead of your whole toolbox.

Losing one of your tools on the flightline is a major breach of discipline and grounds for adverse action.

/so the guy that lost it is definitely a tool
 
2022-05-17 3:04:30 PM  

WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.


In the Navy we called that a "FOD walkdown."   Foreign Objects and Debris.

Given that something as small as a washer or screw can completely grenade a jet engine at FMP, it was something we paid attention to.
 
2022-05-17 3:16:59 PM  

Rent Party: WoodyHayes: Pocket Ninja: I don't understand the intro scene where the guy is walking and kicking wrenches, etc. into small holes. Is that some sort of naval aviator joke?

I was only briefly on an Air Force post for a few weeks but one of the things they had us do was to walk on one of the runways looking for junk on the ground, the technical term of which escapes me at the moment but I'm sure somebody else knows. Basically, you're looking for any tiny little thing at all that can fark with the engines (and the wheels too, I suppose). There is no such thing as "too small."

He wasn't picking it up, he was putting it out of sight. In other words, he was being a shiatbag by not doing his job.

In the Navy we called that a "FOD walkdown."   Foreign Objects and Debris.

Given that something as small as a washer or screw can completely grenade a jet engine at FMP, it was something we paid attention to.


My understanding is that it was a shockingly late development, like the 1970s, when a CV captain or CAG thought, "hey! we're getting all this FOD we constantly have to repair, we should closely check the flight deck before ops" instead of just writing off the damage as cost of doing business.
 
2022-05-17 3:37:14 PM  

GRCooper: My understanding is that it was a shockingly late development, like the 1970s, when a CV captain or CAG thought, "hey! we're getting all this FOD we constantly have to repair, we should closely check the flight deck before ops" instead of just writing off the damage as cost of doing business.


I don't know that they ever took it lightly, but that timing sounds right.  There is actually a MIL-STD for FOD programs that was published in the early '80s.   Given the glacial pace of program development in the US government, the problem coming to attention in the '70s would make sense.

"Non-operational aircraft" is a big issue for a unit commander, though.
 
2022-05-17 3:40:58 PM  

Rent Party: GRCooper: My understanding is that it was a shockingly late development, like the 1970s, when a CV captain or CAG thought, "hey! we're getting all this FOD we constantly have to repair, we should closely check the flight deck before ops" instead of just writing off the damage as cost of doing business.

I don't know that they ever took it lightly, but that timing sounds right.  There is actually a MIL-STD for FOD programs that was published in the early '80s.   Given the glacial pace of program development in the US government, the problem coming to attention in the '70s would make sense.

"Non-operational aircraft" is a big issue for a unit commander, though.


Trying to find the interview with the (eventual) admiral who came up with the idea, but I was kind of shocked it hadn't been done since the 50s.
 
2022-05-17 3:51:09 PM  

GRCooper: Trying to find the interview with the (eventual) admiral who came up with the idea, but I was kind of shocked it hadn't been done since the 50s.


You'd think.  The military is ultimately a reactionary organization, though.   They have a way to do things ("the right way, the wrong way, and our way") and that is how they do it because that is how they do it.  Until something goes completely pear shaped and then they change how they do it.   Then that is how they do it.
 
2022-05-17 6:13:22 PM  

Pocket Ninja: I was thinking it had to be something along those lines. Thanks for the explanation.


You're welcome, though I didn't grasp that the holes were for tie-down points.

Where wolf: FOD walk, Foreign Object Debris. The "holes" he's kicking them into are tie-down points, for use when the wind is up and you want a plane to stay where you put it.


GRCooper: Rent Party: In the Navy we called that a "FOD walkdown."   Foreign Objects and Debris.

Given that something as small as a washer or screw can completely grenade a jet engine at FMP, it was something we paid attention to.

My understanding is that it was a shockingly late development, like the 1970s, when a CV captain or CAG thought, "hey! we're getting all this FOD we constantly have to repair, we should closely check the flight deck before ops" instead of just writing off the damage as cost of doing business.


That was it, "FOD." Thanks, gentlemen.

Rent Party: You'd think.  The military is ultimately a reactionary organization, though.   They have a way to do things ("the right way, the wrong way, and our way") and that is how they do it because that is how they do it.  Until something goes completely pear shaped and then they change how they do it.   Then that is how they do it.


It is an odd thing, that there is so much pragmatism at the small unit level which starts to disappear at an exponential rate as the unit level goes up. I guess it isn't really odd now that I think about it since you're dealing with so many people that the lowest common denominator dictates how things are done but the constant rotations of personnel makes it tough for new ideas to stick and then SOP gets reverted back to.
 
2022-05-17 6:43:27 PM  

Rent Party: GRCooper: Trying to find the interview with the (eventual) admiral who came up with the idea, but I was kind of shocked it hadn't been done since the 50s.

You'd think.  The military is ultimately a reactionary organization, though.   They have a way to do things ("the right way, the wrong way, and our way") and that is how they do it because that is how they do it.  Until something goes completely pear shaped and then they change how they do it.   Then that is how they do it.


I think it also had something to do with aircraft development and jets, as well. As the jets got bigger, the amount of air getting sucked in on the ground increased and started causing more problems. Older jet aircraft like the century series "tended" to have smaller, higher mounted intakes. Even the f-105 had intakes that were probably 6' off the deck.

The f-4, and later f-15, look like the intakes are at least a foot lower than that. And the f-16 is even lower. Add that to the massive increase in air moving in and suddenly FOD becomes a bigger problem than in the 1940s-1960s.

Also, fun fact, this is one of the reasons the A-10 chose high mounted nacelles, to increase its ability to land on unimproved surfaces and forward bases. They also included a winch in the top of the nacelle to reduce the amount of support equipment needed at a forward base.
 
2022-05-17 6:51:14 PM  
The FOD walk made me laugh. the rest of it was terrible, also not nearly homoerotic enough.
 
2022-05-17 7:49:43 PM  

Any Pie Left: also not nearly homoerotic enough.


You and I apparently watched a different volleyball scene
 
2022-05-17 9:03:55 PM  
I guess we forgot about Hot Shots
 
2022-05-17 9:32:59 PM  

Space Station Wagon: I guess we forgot about Hot Shots


1991 ...
 
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