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(Fark)   I'm beginning to think I will never grow anything ever again. Please come in and convince me otherwise in your weekly Fark gardening thread for Tuesday May 17, 2022   (fark.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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374 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 May 2022 at 7:00 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2022-05-16 10:16:25 PM  
16 votes:
I did a thing.

I dicked around and never actually made any tomato or pepper starts when I was supposed to a couple of months ago.

So today I put dirt in a million pots and put tomato and pepper seeds in them and put happy little cloches on top.

This is a grand experiment, given that we had frost last week.

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2022-05-16 8:15:52 PM  
13 votes:
We learned that the tulips at the house we bought in November are orange.

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2022-05-16 8:02:58 PM  
10 votes:
I got a job doing cemetery grounds keeping last week...
I'm so sore and it feels so good
 
2022-05-17 9:06:30 AM  
10 votes:
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I'm currently swimming in radishes. Basically it's radishes with every meal at this point.
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The peas are also taking off
 
2022-05-16 10:20:48 PM  
9 votes:
The perennial herbs are looking good.

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2022-05-17 7:39:31 AM  
8 votes:
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This is a bed of jalapeños. We lost one plant to one of our neighborhood commando rabbits. I got the scope on my .177 crossman dialed in. But in the end they're so cute and I couldn't take the bloody shot. So I hired an army of marigolds. So far they are thwarting the bunnies.
 
2022-05-17 7:52:17 AM  
8 votes:
I've been outside in my garden about 60% of every day this past 2 weeks. I've been gardening for about 6 years now. I've killed a LOT of plants lol but I've learned a lot about nitrogen, calcium and how it affects plant growth. I've also learned a lot about solar, raspberry pi and all it's sensors and cool stuff. Even caught some cosmic rays in my data. I've fried 3 raspberry pis to the Garden God (Demeter?)

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The goldfish and koi make lots of ammonia and nitrogen. I have a pump and water feature to control the algea. The cats like to play with the fish. The fish jump out to catch bugs! I love sitting and playing the guitar on the deck next to the fishies. A fox or something ate all my big koi RIP :( Imma git that fox one day. See that green hose, bottom left? Using the capillary effect, suction, and gravity, water is sucked out and down into my greenhouse where there is a float valve to store the water and stop the flow when full. On some nights the moon itself pulls water up and out! It's amazing to know that.

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The solar powered greenhouse has a 4x100w 12v panels, a pair wired in series and each pair wired parallel to achieve 24v. I think that's a 2kw inverter. The raspberry pi collects data on humidity, temperature, water level, and time lapse movies of the plants moving!! Cucumbers move all day long looking for something to grab. It's freaky. Learned temp and humidity have an inverse relationship and when temperature rises and humidity drops and they cross each other, that's the dew point. I would be able to predict the weather by looking at the temp/humd patterns. Data is amazing! A mechanical electric timer controls the water pump to feed the plants. I'm rejiggering the right side. I might plant asparagus. The left side is all nightshades, tomatoes, potatoes, and some garlic and onions too. I have to watch the tomatoes EVERYDAY for hornworms. If I forget even 1 day, they will all be eaten up. I don't use pesticides.

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I turned my front porch into a small salad using some compost I've been making. I have NEVER had strawberries grow like this. It's amazing and inspiring. I want to keep making dirt! It really is true, the dirt needs to be alive and full of life. Life comes from life.

There's the strawberries out front, then cucumbers and sugar peas, lettuce, cantaloupes, chamomile, green peppers, Tabasco peppers.

I plan on digging a well and getting a wind turbine. I have a 3kwh solar system on the main house, and I just got a EcoFlow Delta Pro 3.6kwh battery for the house backup and for a remote charging unit for the Tesla. I want to store the water from the well in a tower so I can release some to generate electricity as a last resort. The wind will generate a little energy when it rains, the solar when the sun is out. I'm not trying to be an island. My plan is to lower my expenses and learn enough about the world to not NEED anything. No man is an island. We need each other.

I really enjoy gardening and trying to be one with nature. I like having creating the dirt via compost from my waste, the fish fertilizing the water, planting my seed in the fertile land, using the power of the sun and moon and move to lift the water and make electricity for my loved one's happy consumption. Happy Gardening to you!
 
2022-05-17 8:49:45 AM  
8 votes:
Rising and shining!

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Just finished up the front yard bog for the moment with some giant sarracenia in the back.
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And a wee little cover for the drosera adelae, see if I can acclimate it to full sun:
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2022-05-17 8:55:44 AM  
8 votes:
Also, the strawberry and rhubarb patch is *roaring* along. Already made a bunch of syrups and debris

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2022-05-17 9:02:29 AM  
8 votes:
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Veggie jungle gym is good to go! Only a few things left to stick in the ground. It expanded by an additional 4' x 16' section this year for a bit more space and to have an easy way to rotate the nightshades. Bonus: less lawn.

The one quirk I'm not thrilled with is that I won't be able to take full advantage of the trellis - a wall of vines will shade whatever's growing behind - but I'm pondering solutions and experimenting by planting it more sparsely with a few shorter-growing things and putting most of the beans in pots.
 
2022-05-16 10:58:02 PM  
7 votes:

Wendigogo: rosekolodny: Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.

I have California poppies sprouting in situ.  I have high hopes for them.

In other news, my autocarrot has gone absolutely mad.  I wrote hopes correctly, and it corrected to Hope's.  It ADDED two mistakes to a perfectly good word.

It's amazing how much autocorrupt gets wrong. It's just so counter-intuitive.

I wish you luck with the California poppies. They are so pretty!

As I may have mentioned, my back-up plan is sunflowers. My MiL gave me some seeds she got at a fundraiser, so I'll have zinnias, daisies, and marigolds too. Kind of getting in a gardening groove finally. It's nice.


I went through the seeds today and decided there were a lot of things I just don't need in the box.  I took all the sunflower, bachelor's button, marigold, and a couple other flower seeds, and tossed them around the yard.

They might grow. Hooray for them if they do. Either way they're not in my seed box taking up room anymore.

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2022-05-17 7:46:57 AM  
7 votes:
Bro. I got so good at growing plants during lockdown that I purchased my 1st "expensive' plant last month!

My Queen Anthurium!

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I also grow great weed

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2022-05-16 10:35:43 PM  
6 votes:
Went to a seedling sale on Saturday. Jr Geologist was very excited and into it - in addition to helping with the big gardens, the Jr Geologists each have a garden of their very own (3' x 3' planter box on an unused portion of our driveway).

So the 5-year-old got purple basil (it's PURPLE!), some cosmos, and a watermelon seedling. The 3-year-old decided she wanted a cucumber.

And I got some rosemary and thyme - the first I couldn't find in seed form, the second absolutely failed to germinate for me.
 
2022-05-16 10:49:13 PM  
6 votes:
Today is my birthday, subby. Please plant a lemon tree for me :)
 
2022-05-17 8:23:08 AM  
6 votes:
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also some pictures!
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onions looking good
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and some garlic (this year there will be no vampires) and potatoes.

We do have lots and lots of slugs and snails too. I collect them by hand whenever I see one. When the bucket is getting crowded we let them free in the nearby woods. I suspect them of coming back. Also we've planted marigolds as sacrificial plants everywhere in between the better plants. It probably attracts them or serves as a healthy appetizer?
 
2022-05-17 9:11:49 AM  
6 votes:
If you are impatient for something in the early spring, even in areas that are cold, there are many varieties of crocus.
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Mine came up in snow this year.

Snowdrops have many varieties too.
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Many kinds of Muscari as well. (aka grape hyacinths)

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Glory of the Snow is a good one.
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One of my fav's, little Iris called Iris Reticulata,

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Most of these bloomed before any of the tulips or daffodils opened.
 
2022-05-17 10:39:31 AM  
6 votes:
The garlic is making a brave show and the asparagus is coming on.  I'm not a huge asparagus fan but Mrs. knobmaker loves the stuff.  I will admit that the home grown spears are a lot better than any we've bought.  They  don't even make your pee smell funny.

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2022-05-16 11:50:05 PM  
5 votes:
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2022-05-17 5:32:22 AM  
5 votes:
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The sunflower seeds I planted last Monday have started coming up! Just three so far. I do have another bunch in a protected area that I can transplant once they're bigger (hedging my bets against these getting dug up by cute rodent friends)

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Grass! I didn't think this had survived the winter but I noticed tiny little green bits middle of last week. I guess it just needed the massive amount of rain we got last week?

Speaking of rain... how do ya'll keep track of watering and plant care notes? I am AWFUL at remembering when I did stuff so need to record it. (physical methods are better than digital for me as well)
 
2022-05-17 7:40:46 AM  
5 votes:
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Persian Star garlic
 
2022-05-17 7:42:38 AM  
5 votes:
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Sugar Rush Peach peppers. More marigold soldiers.
 
2022-05-17 10:29:50 AM  
5 votes:
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That's hardware and wiring progress for drip irrigation system. I get the last adaptors later this week, and I'll complete the wiring this week as well. Pvc is done and fully leak checked, and the inline pump works like a charm.

Just in time to get tomatoes, cucumbers, and eggplants in the ground. If I get my butt in gear I'll have version 0.9 of the software done by memorial day.
 
2022-05-17 12:52:56 PM  
5 votes:
Old trick for  city dwellers: a pallet garden.   Get two pallets.  Sacrifice one to fill the gaps on the bottom of the good pallet.  Line with garden cloth.  Fill with dirt and manure.  Plant herbs and some small flowers in between the slats.  Once everything's rooted, you can leave it lying flat OR turn it on one side  and wire to a post.  Herbs will keep growing all summer and into the fall, ready to pick.  You can even grow one on an apartment balcony!
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2022-05-16 8:15:22 PM  
4 votes:
we've had kinda perfect weather for gardens this week.  some really nice sunny days, and a cpl of rainy days so everything's had plenty to drink.

and no frost, so the jasmine's going for broke

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2022-05-17 7:17:45 AM  
4 votes:
I went camping for two nights and lost all my seedlings.  I thought, "Hey, I've been only watering them every other day.  They'll be fine." They were not fine.  I might be able to save some, but they're pretty gone.  None have started to perk back up yet.

It's not a big deal in the hgrand scheme, but I'm not okay.
 
2022-05-17 7:33:33 AM  
4 votes:
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I get the feeling my fellow Farkers are gardening in more challenging zones. I'm zone 6b in New England. We put our seedlings out about two weeks ago. This year the tomato house is housing Chadwick cherries, German Johnsons, and orange accordions. And for the first time I'm intercropping Jimmy Nardello peppers.
 
2022-05-17 9:01:04 AM  
4 votes:
I will not be getting an A in seed starting 101. I left the trays out with lids on to keep them warm, the sun popped out, and they got cooked. A single cucumber survived. Luckily, I have too many seeds, so I sowed directly last Thursday. I made a pollinator patch in the middle of the plot and those are popping out, as well as one zucchini, and a few of the radishes.

The seeds that did not have lids did much better. I managed to transplant 12 peas and it looks like 10 are enjoying their new habitat. I am going to get a soil block system, that a lot of you farkers have been using, for next time.

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But mostly, the bale garden is growing mushrooms. Another good sign of decomposition in the bales.

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I also got a dozen sunflowers in the ground. A few have been chomped by critters, but the survivors are growing fast. I went and put another 24 sunflower seeds into containers to get them started, plus a few containers with native perennials, and shade plants. There's plenty of space for them around the property.

Oh and the Arbor Day foundation delivered 10 bareroot trees that I need to find space for. I'll be outside digging as soon as I'm off the clock today.
 
2022-05-17 9:31:29 AM  
4 votes:

AlgaeRancher: Anybody got tips on how to best deal with unwelcome vines?


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I have no special tricks. I just remember that when we moved into the current house in the fall a few years there were thick mats of dead vines covering a sizable wooded section of our backyard. The prior owner had nuked the area with some kind of herbicide. I cleared out a ridiculous quantity of dead vines. It appeared to have killed everything, but as I learned the following spring, that didn't stop the winter creeper. I've been pulling and digging it out of the ground ever since.

That first year was the worst. It still comes up here and there, but far, far less. I pull maybe a dozen sprouts a week this time and year and less later. Persistence. If I let it go, it would take over again.

Now that area is stuff we've planted and other native plants that got there on their own instead of a huge mat of winter creeper. Okay, the hostas and coral bells we planted aren't native, but we've added columbine, may apples, wild geranium, ginger, a little Virginia creeper (that I will not let take over), ferns, and I forget what else that are native.

Winter creeper? EXTERMINATE!
 
2022-05-17 10:22:19 AM  
4 votes:

kdawg7736: I would like to try potatoes. Maybe a more exotic pepper as well. So food, yes.


Potatoes are one of those things that people don't grow because they think there's little difference between store potatoes and ones you grow.  That is not true.  The first time I grew potatoes I was astonished at how much better home grown ones are.  It's not quite as profound a difference as tomatoes but it's still a big step up.
 
2022-05-17 10:54:44 AM  
4 votes:
Huge week for the Catmandu garden. I picked up my plants on Wednesday and did the patio planters the same day

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Over the last few days I composted, tilled, planted, and mulched the tomato garden and planted the veggie grow bags.

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These are the cucumbers. I am going to build an A-frame trellis once they emerge. The round bag is the pole beans and I will finish setting up the string tower after those come up.
 
2022-05-17 6:22:46 PM  
4 votes:

knobmaker: More garden CSBs, please?


I was about 10 when I got my first garden. There was a space under a tree that was maybe 2ft x 3 ft and Mom told me I could plant anything. I love violets and the wood violet grows every where (it is even the state flower). Anyway, I dug up violet plants when I saw them and transplanted them into the space. Mom had prepped the soil just like she did with her garden so it was nice and rich. Those plants came back every year and produced blossoms the size of silver dollars!

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2022-05-17 7:27:18 AM  
3 votes:
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I mowed these guys over last fall, the first one on accident and the rest to complete is so I could replant something else. As it turns out, they don't die so easily, and are actually quite pretty.
 
2022-05-17 8:04:29 AM  
3 votes:

Sunidesus: Lady J: Sunidesus: Speaking of rain... how do ya'll keep track of watering and plant care notes? I am AWFUL at remembering when I did stuff so need to record it. (physical methods are better than digital for me as well)

in a... pad of paper?

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I guess I'm wondering stuff like: a page for each plant? a calendar of some sort? a day planner kind of thing? 3-ring binder so pages can move around?
There are a TON of different methods people use so I'm curious what people here do. Google turns up so. many. options.

I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.


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Simple. Cheap. Messy. I just scribble down things I do in the garden and scribble the date I did them.
 
2022-05-17 8:12:10 AM  
3 votes:

Sunidesus: I guess I'm wondering stuff like: a page for each plant? a calendar of some sort? a day planner kind of thing? 3-ring binder so pages can move around?
There are a TON of different methods people use so I'm curious what people here do. Google turns up so. many. options.

I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.


I do it by hand too, in a tatty old notebook. I usually only write down if some method works usually well (like tea made of rhubarb leaves actually helps against those fleas eating the broad beans). And I make crude unreadable drawings of what I planted where- for crop rotation.
I also have endless lists of plants I'd like to have. Our garden is quite small so usually I'm waiting for one plant to die before I search for something new.

Watering is every few days, and I don't write it down. I water the days when my youngest kids start preschool and school late plus sundays, because they love to help.
 
2022-05-17 8:14:31 AM  
3 votes:
Just outside my workshop, below the porch, I used to have grape vines.  But I stomped all over them rebuilding the front.  Wife was going to the garden shop last May.  I asked to pick me up a grape vine.  She'd read up.  "You're supposed to plant grapes in the fall.  They settle in over the winter.  But you won't get any grapes the first year..."  Asked anyway.  She bought the last one.  I thumped it in the ground with some manure and string.  Three days later like grapey fingers sprout.  In a month I had grapes.  The birds would fly down and steal them, mice climbed to get them, and I spooked a nibbling rabbit one morning.  So lesson is... do whatever gardening you want.
 
2022-05-17 10:45:45 AM  
3 votes:
Thats garlic in thd back, then dill and sorrel that i just planted the other day. Fennel from seed has just sprouted - going to try to make pastis from scratch.
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2022-05-17 10:56:34 AM  
3 votes:

ModernPrimitive01: [Fark user image image 355x471]
I'm currently swimming in radishes. Basically it's radishes with every meal at this point.
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The peas are also taking off


I've had luck making radish pickles, using a basic bread-and-butter recipe. You might give that a whirl and put some up to go with pulled pork in the fall and winter.
 
2022-05-17 11:04:08 AM  
3 votes:
My neighbor 2 doors down and I planned an herb garden in the space of the end townhouse. The owner has mobility issues and has no interest in planting and has trouble with doing the weeding so the deal is that my neighbor and I would use the place and plant our herbs and maintain the space. In exchange, she can use some herbs and put out some cute decorations like solar flowers, etc.

Here it is except the mulching

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Also, my columnar apple trees broke dormancy and are budding out!

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2022-05-17 11:17:56 AM  
3 votes:

FrancoFile: Omnivorous: I'm beginning to think I will never grow anything ever again. Please come in and convince me otherwise

Get yourself an AeroGarden, a hydroponic system that's pretty simple.  (Scotts MiracleGro owns the company.)
This advice is best in October, at the end of the outdoor growing season, but we use ours year-around for bok choy, lettuces and herbs -- some of which do poorly in summer heat.

You'll likely find yourself cycling the garden every 60-90 days, at least we do with the 9-slot garden.  We'll grow bok choy and lettuce over the summer but inside where they won't bolt quickly.

The real joy with the hydroponic gardens is during the short winter days when they're a bright spot of light and green.

I use my aerogarden in Feb and March for starting things from seed. Just don't wait too long for transplanting to dirt or you'll kill too many rootlets.


I have a knock-off aero garden that has 4 removable containers, each can hold 5 plugs. The good thing about this is that I can transplant the seedlings into small nursery pots and put the pots where the container was. I was able to bring almost every seedling to planting size. Only lost 2 Thyme but all the tomatoes and basil grew. I even had a mystery plant. I found some seeds in my desk drawer from a few years ago that failed to start, there were 2 left so I figured "why not". I knew they were some kind of annual flower. Well, I started 2, 1 came up and I am now the proud owner of a small monkey flower on my patio

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The hydroponic unit I use:

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2022-05-17 11:29:53 AM  
3 votes:

rosekolodny: The perennial herbs are looking good.

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Have you ever made chive blossom vinegar? Take a handful of washed blossoms, heat up some white vinegar, put the blossoms in and let them steep for a week or two. Strain, then bottle. It is a nice sweet onioney flavor (kind of like the brine for cocktail onions), pretty pink-ish purple color, and makes great salad dressings and marinades.

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2022-05-17 11:44:47 AM  
3 votes:
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Lilac. Needs pruning
 
2022-05-17 12:29:25 PM  
3 votes:
My dream house.

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2022-05-17 12:34:12 PM  
3 votes:
The newest blooms are the elderberry, gaura. Deer keep chomping on the Campanula buds before they open, and the Lysmachia cordifolia is trying to take over the world. The elderberry also is a climbing tree for passiflora edulus, which has been blooming for a few weeks.

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2022-05-17 12:35:46 PM  
3 votes:
The irises are blooming. The tulips are spent. There's a pretty happy brunnera on the lower right, and I'm too lazy to go take another pic sans finger. 
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2022-05-17 1:32:41 PM  
3 votes:

Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.


Diatomaceous earth works good on insects, it is non poisonous and is like broken glass to insects. It is inexpensive and you can get it at pool supply stores ( used in pool filters).
If you are getting professional help, they should be able to spread "bait" for the ants to take to the queen.
 
2022-05-17 2:11:25 PM  
3 votes:
Some of the best memories of my life were spent in a garden with my family. My great grandfather had a huge farm of several hundred acres. It would be 98 degrees and walking behind his tractor feeling the cool soil on my feet and the smell of fresh turned earth was amazing. I can still smell it and feel it 45 yrs later.

He primarily grew corn. He had won numerous awards and competitions growing up in the 20s 30s etc with corn he grew. Yes this was a matter of pride back in his day before factory farming took over the world. In the late 60s through mid 80s I spent with him and my grandparents and my great grandmother farming. Hard work dark til dark. And I was a kid. Wouldnt trade it for anything.

My grandmother..his daughter..my mothers mother was said to be able to "lay a seed on a slab of granite and still get it to grow" and although an obvious embellishment she was almost supernatural in her abilities to grow anything under any circumstance.

Look into heirloom varieties of corn. People are amazed at the difference. I remember biting into corn on the cob so juicy it would pop and it wasnt unusual for the juice to squirt your sister across the table. Sweet and juicy. Not bland like today.

Heirloom varieties of tomato etc are all much better tasting.

I cant grow a garden like I used to. I used to keep 4 acres of squash okra peas beans etc. I cut way back to about an acre and half now and probably smaller next year unless I back off other job responsibilities.

Sometimes its true it cost more to grow....but the flavor and lack of chemicals is well worth the difference. I do still plant copious acres of corn for my cattle etc. But for home usage I just dont have the time any more
 
2022-05-17 2:21:05 PM  
3 votes:

thrillbilly1967: Some of the best memories of my life were spent in a garden with my family. My great grandfather had a huge farm of several hundred acres. It would be 98 degrees and walking behind his tractor feeling the cool soil on my feet and the smell of fresh turned earth was amazing. I can still smell it and feel it 45 yrs later.

He primarily grew corn. He had won numerous awards and competitions growing up in the 20s 30s etc with corn he grew. Yes this was a matter of pride back in his day before factory farming took over the world. In the late 60s through mid 80s I spent with him and my grandparents and my great grandmother farming. Hard work dark til dark. And I was a kid. Wouldnt trade it for anything.

My grandmother..his daughter..my mothers mother was said to be able to "lay a seed on a slab of granite and still get it to grow" and although an obvious embellishment she was almost supernatural in her abilities to grow anything under any circumstance.

Look into heirloom varieties of corn. People are amazed at the difference. I remember biting into corn on the cob so juicy it would pop and it wasnt unusual for the juice to squirt your sister across the table. Sweet and juicy. Not bland like today.

Heirloom varieties of tomato etc are all much better tasting.

I cant grow a garden like I used to. I used to keep 4 acres of squash okra peas beans etc. I cut way back to about an acre and half now and probably smaller next year unless I back off other job responsibilities.

Sometimes its true it cost more to grow....but the flavor and lack of chemicals is well worth the difference. I do still plant copious acres of corn for my cattle etc. But for home usage I just dont have the time any more


Very CSB.

Similarly reaching back through time -
My dad was apprenticed to his uncle the blacksmith. There was a local farmer who competed in the world plowing competitions. Which is a thing. Held in Kansas one year, then Argentina, then Australia, etc. Before every contest he'd go to my great uncle to get all his gear sharpened. Plowshare, harrows, etc.  Wouldn't have anyone else touch his stuff, not even the John Deere reps who sponsored the thing.
 
2022-05-17 3:46:49 PM  
3 votes:
Did somebody say potatoes?
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Left Sarpo Mira, two weeks after Charlotte, right. I gambled on starting the Charlottes as early as possible and it's come off, not a hint of frost now.

Strawberries with some Pak Choi taking up the space:
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Back to front:
Onions, japanese and red spring,
Beetroot,
Carrots,
Spinach with a couple of volunteer Pentland Javelin potatoes (I disliked these for flavour and texture so if these are the same I'll make sure to excavate them all this time),
More Pak Choi,
Radishes,
Broad beans
Fark user imageView Full Size


Sown in cold frame from this weekend are:
Kale, spinach, swiss chard, Pak Choi, basil, coriander, radish
 
2022-05-17 5:56:17 PM  
3 votes:
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2022-05-17 5:59:11 PM  
3 votes:
Pods of death ripening. This ghost pepper plant survived from last year and is producing nice fruit.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-17 6:05:07 PM  
3 votes:
This Tabasco plant is over 4ft tall and prolific. 
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-17 7:31:07 PM  
3 votes:
My birdhouse needed a plant too.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 7:45:56 PM  
2 votes:
So this is what greeted me this morning as I woke up:

Fark user imageView Full Size


I love snow, but... Yeah.  May.  MID-May.

I will never garden again.  EVAR.
 
2022-05-16 8:16:24 PM  
2 votes:

ThomasPaineTrain: We learned that the tulips at the house we bought in November are orange.

[Fark user image image 425x191]


they kick ass!
 
2022-05-16 10:32:34 PM  
2 votes:
I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.
 
2022-05-16 10:37:48 PM  
2 votes:

Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.


I have California poppies sprouting in situ.  I have high hopes for them.

In other news, my autocarrot has gone absolutely mad.  I wrote hopes correctly, and it corrected to Hope's.  It ADDED two mistakes to a perfectly good word.
 
2022-05-17 5:24:30 AM  
2 votes:
Did an emergency repotting of a purple passion plant someone gifted me two weeks ago when it was showing classic signs of nute burn (excess nitrogen; the leaf tips will tend to curl downward into a claw-like shape).  Got to it a bit late due to a vacation, but long story short, it turns out plant ermmm "manufacturers" can and will put time-release fertilizer directly in the pot, mixed in with the soil, and it can totally be way too much / start killing the plant.

One of the ways, I've found, to detect this (other than just avoiding it by growing from seed/clone yourself) is to get a digital ph meter and water The Baby until it starts draining the volume of the pot.  Then ph test it.  But then wait to see if the pH slowly and steadily starts creeping acidic over a few minutes.  You'll wonder whether your meter needs calibrating.  That's my first clue, other than symptoms, that the medium is adulterated with a slow-release fertilizer.

Only thing I could do at that point is unpot it gently, try to keep all the large roots intact, and just get rid of as much of its soil as possible.  Replaced it with a mix of perlite and vermiculite, flushed with distilled water, then added a normal dose of superthrive (an auxin hormone analog) and flushed one final time.  The superthrive step helps stimulate replacement root and foliage regrowth.

So far seems to have stopped the die off in its tracks, but I'm only 50-50 on full survival.

Tldr: beware of buying/being gifted a potted plant; if it starts dying it might not be your fault, and if you want a full growing experience, get bulbs / seeds instead.
 
2022-05-17 6:30:46 AM  
2 votes:

Sunidesus: Speaking of rain... how do ya'll keep track of watering and plant care notes? I am AWFUL at remembering when I did stuff so need to record it. (physical methods are better than digital for me as well)


in a... pad of paper?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-17 7:49:48 AM  
2 votes:
I shoveled and raked out a half cubic yard of top soil yesterday to fill in a shallow spot created by a contractor last summer.   I used that green mat that has seeds imbedded in it and breaks down as a cover.  I'm not a fan of the crap with the plastic netting as it gets caught in the lawn mower.
So as I'm patching a second spot I turn around and see my three year old neighbor stomping through my freshly watered and seeded lawn farking up the mat and leaving big potholes. Our eyes met and he knew he farked up.
I shouldn't be on here huh?
No.
Ooooops.  I'm sorry.
I just shook my head and carried on.  Kid was too cute and little to yell at.
 
2022-05-17 8:01:07 AM  
2 votes:
Decided to grow for the first time since I was 18. Which was, if my math works out, a literal lifetime ago on the farm.

I successfully killed 6 of my 18 tomatoe seedlings I planted 4 weeks ago by leaving them out in direct sunlight and forgetting to water them for a day.

I decided to go low tech just to start off. No grow lights or anything. Just take them inside during crap weather.

My sunflowers enjoyed it, which considering where they are from, is a bit of a derp moment on my part for killing my tomatoes. I'll have to transplant my sunflowers soon, so thier roots don't clump together. 2 weeks after sprouting, they are 3 inches tall already. My tomatoes are at the angry inch, they sprouted at tue same time.
 
2022-05-17 8:02:47 AM  
2 votes:
Finally got my bi-color Sunflowers outside. First set of morning glories got killed by the frost, so I'm germinating more.
Of course, the marigolds (Mexican and french) are coming on like crazy now that the weather has turned to better.
Fark user imageView Full Size

Sunflowers.
Fark user imageView Full Size

A few of the marigolds.
 
2022-05-17 8:07:51 AM  
2 votes:
Third year in a row some farkin bug has eaten my cabbages and cauliflowers. I suspect when I plant out the kale and broccoli that they will similarly get destroyed. Why don't these bug pricks eat my farkin weeds at the same rate as my veg!
 
2022-05-17 8:16:46 AM  
2 votes:

I May Be Crazy But...: I went camping for two nights and lost all my seedlings.  I thought, "Hey, I've been only watering them every other day.  They'll be fine." They were not fine.  I might be able to save some, but they're pretty gone.  None have started to perk back up yet.

It's not a big deal in the hgrand scheme, but I'm not okay.


Solar powered irrigation pump with drip feeders fed from a water butt is required. They take care of themselves then.
 
2022-05-17 8:30:29 AM  
2 votes:

munkkiniemi: [Fark user image image 425x566]
also some pictures!
[Fark user image image 425x318]
onions looking good
[Fark user image image 425x298]
and some garlic (this year there will be no vampires) and potatoes.

We do have lots and lots of slugs and snails too. I collect them by hand whenever I see one. When the bucket is getting crowded we let them free in the nearby woods. I suspect them of coming back. Also we've planted marigolds as sacrificial plants everywhere in between the better plants. It probably attracts them or serves as a healthy appetizer?


That looks fantastic
 
2022-05-17 8:41:41 AM  
2 votes:
While I am waiting for cold weather to pass, I am growing Pothos.
Fark user imageView Full Size

They don't need much light.  You can water them a small amount once a week.  If you forget, all the leaves droop, water it and they come back up.  Comes in many varieties.
i.pinimg.comView Full Size


They are also known to purify air.  Downside, toxic to children and pets.  I keep mine stashed so that the cat cannot get to it.  Have lots of these in the office at work, grow well in my office with no windows.
 
2022-05-17 8:44:06 AM  
2 votes:

August11: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Sugar Rush Peach peppers. More marigold soldiers.


Those are some nice beds! I plan on taking down the privacy fence, leaving the posts up and having beds of perennial asparagus between the posts and have vines of some sort on a trellis. I can't find the video, but it was a no till method of laying down topsoil and then a layer of hay and planting the potatoes/asparagus/whatever by pushing them through the layer of hay.

Here's the video that started me down the no till path. It's fascinating

Treating the Farm as an Ecosystem with Gabe Brown Part 1, The 5 Tenets of Soil Health
Youtube uUmIdq0D6-A
 
2022-05-17 8:59:51 AM  
2 votes:
There's a guy who does a lot of landscaping work in my neighborhood. Two months ago, I made a deal with him to haul 2 yards of organic compost to my garden and rototill. We just needed to wait until the ground dries out enough to till. We're still waiting...So tired of rain.
 
2022-05-17 9:14:20 AM  
2 votes:
munkkiniemi:

If you've got slug problems, if you have an outdoor fire, use the left over ashes to form a barrier around whatever you're trying to protect. There is a lot of salt that gets made during the burning process, and slugs won't cross it. We use the same process to protect our mushroom logs. Just don't get any ashes on your plants because it'll kill them.
 
2022-05-17 9:17:12 AM  
2 votes:

beerrun: Peppers in our Earthboxes do extremely well every year. This year is no exception as jalepeno, habenero, ghost, tabasco and bell peppers all producing. The tabasco bush is at least 4 ft tall and must have over 100 pods in various stages of ripeness. One ghost plant is a holdover from last year and is yielding some really nice, large pods. Counted at least 15 pods on the jalepeno with several ready to harvest. In years past, we've had problems with whiteflies but this year amongst the pepper plants we've planted basil, mint, lemongrass and society garlic and haven't seen a one. Pics when I get a chance.


I wouldn't attempt to grow tomatoes or peppers without Earthboxes. They make it easy.
I've been taking my plants outside to begin gardening off before I plant them next week. They are so ready to get out of the greenhouses. Some have already begun flowering even though I myself was a late bloomer.
I went to a plant exchange last weekend and picked up a habenada - a habanero variety that tastes like citrus with no heat? Has anyone tasted one?
 
2022-05-17 10:30:50 AM  
2 votes:

knobmaker: kdawg7736: I would like to try potatoes. Maybe a more exotic pepper as well. So food, yes.

Potatoes are one of those things that people don't grow because they think there's little difference between store potatoes and ones you grow.  That is not true.  The first time I grew potatoes I was astonished at how much better home grown ones are.  It's not quite as profound a difference as tomatoes but it's still a big step up.


And they're so easy! My husband bought me bags to plant in this year. Plant potato seed. When they leaf out, cover with more soil. Rinse and repeat. Water regularly and wait until fall.
I got some free organic purple potato seed from the state extension office and Yukon gold seeds, so my two bags are full.
 
2022-05-17 11:05:19 AM  
2 votes:
Sunny, I almost didn't grow anything this year either, didn't start any seeds at all.

Went to the garden center and bought some starts and it feels good to go though the ritual of planting.

Take your time, keep it modest, but don't give up.
 
2022-05-17 11:23:37 AM  
2 votes:

patrick767: AlgaeRancher: Anybody got tips on how to best deal with unwelcome vines?

[Fark user image image 200x200]

I have no special tricks. I just remember that when we moved into the current house in the fall a few years there were thick mats of dead vines covering a sizable wooded section of our backyard. The prior owner had nuked the area with some kind of herbicide. I cleared out a ridiculous quantity of dead vines. It appeared to have killed everything, but as I learned the following spring, that didn't stop the winter creeper. I've been pulling and digging it out of the ground ever since.

That first year was the worst. It still comes up here and there, but far, far less. I pull maybe a dozen sprouts a week this time and year and less later. Persistence. If I let it go, it would take over again.

Now that area is stuff we've planted and other native plants that got there on their own instead of a huge mat of winter creeper. Okay, the hostas and coral bells we planted aren't native, but we've added columbine, may apples, wild geranium, ginger, a little Virginia creeper (that I will not let take over), ferns, and I forget what else that are native.

Winter creeper? EXTERMINATE!


I hate Virginia Creeper, but my landlord loves it.

I'm rooting a bunch of it for him right now, and I find it absolutely baffling that anyone would plant it on purpose.  Whatever. He can do what he wants.
 
2022-05-17 11:39:43 AM  
2 votes:
Mostly things are just growing. It's nice enough to sit outside in the evening.
This year's tomato is flowering:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Last year's tomato is showing a growth spurt. I'm going to try and root a cutting from it later this fall:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Shade side:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Sunny side.  The pea plant on the left was going to go into the compost bin but it started new growth on the top so I'll leave it.  It's also the aphid sacrifice plant.  I got them under control on the other plants with a soap spray but it's not supposed to be used on peas.

Fark user imageView Full Size


The potato pots are going like gangbusters.

Fark user imageView Full Size


/zone 9b
 
2022-05-17 2:37:32 PM  
2 votes:

thrillbilly1967: Something for those with limited space or unco operating weather. Get plastic 55 galon drums. Cut in half lengthways. Put 2x4 legs on them. If you have weird weather where snow etc may pop up. Put small wheels on two of the legs. You can put a great many of these inside a garage. Make your wife park outside lol And wheel them back out after the weather passes. Or push them all close together and take half inch pvc and rebar and build a dome over and cover in plastic. Weather passes remove plastic. Be amazed what plants will survive if protected from ice. A single heat lamp inside an enclosure will save most. I ca build a pvc and rebar green house in about 2 hours thats 15x45 for about 100 bucks.


I think I might put some wheels on pallets to bring all the pots in and out of the garage when the winter comes around.

I'll need to get a wife, if I'm making her park outside.
 
2022-05-17 2:41:16 PM  
2 votes:
Okay, I have a garden-related CSB, maybe.

When I was a little boy, my grandparents came to visit us.  We were living in the west at the time, and the backyard was caliche with a thin layer of hauled-in topsoil.

Now, my grandfather was a scientist, and he decided to help my father make a garden.  He organized the backyard into beds that would be watered by little canals, just like the fields of produce growing out in the irrigated desert.  It was really pretty cool.

My father was a wonderful man, a veteran of WW II, and as gentle a person as I have ever met.

As soon as my grandfather went back to NY, my father leveled all the beds and destroyed the irrigation system and planted his garden just like he'd always planted gardens.  I've always wondered why exactly.  I never asked him, thinking that it might be a sore spot.  But my father, as handsome and brilliant as he was, was a half-Cherokee from Apache, Oklahoma, who had by a quirk of the war met and married a princess from the upstate NY gentility.

I've sometimes had the same emotion when folks try to teach me stuff I think I already know.

Often, it turns out, I don't know.
 
2022-05-17 9:27:17 PM  
2 votes:

August11: Wine Sipping Elitist: August11: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Sugar Rush Peach peppers. More marigold soldiers.

Those are some nice beds! I plan on taking down the privacy fence, leaving the posts up and having beds of perennial asparagus between the posts and have vines of some sort on a trellis. I can't find the video, but it was a no till method of laying down topsoil and then a layer of hay and planting the potatoes/asparagus/whatever by pushing them through the layer of hay.

Here's the video that started me down the no till path. It's fascinating

[YouTube video: Treating the Farm as an Ecosystem with Gabe Brown Part 1, The 5 Tenets of Soil Health]

I tried the Ruth Stout method for the past few years but I couldn't get it to work. There is a video of her and her no till method out there. She literally just throws the seed potatoes on the ground and then throws a clump of spoiled hay over them. I went back to the bucket method. I hope you get it to work.


That description sounds lazy and only half the story. Layering soil and hay year after year and using cover crops when not growing veggies to keep the soil "alive" is the way to go.

So far, so good. I'm making some beds like you (and some inspiration from other farkers in this thread) on top of the soil. I'll let you know how it goes in a few years.

Cheers
 
2022-05-16 7:55:32 PM  
1 vote:
Yep. Weather was amazing in March, then April and May ruined everything.
 
2022-05-16 8:41:46 PM  
1 vote:

ThomasPaineTrain: We learned that the tulips at the house we bought in November are orange.

[Fark user image image 425x191]


Those are lovely!

I'm living vicariously.   My time will come, but it's not yet in the Interior.
 
2022-05-16 10:50:00 PM  
1 vote:

rosekolodny: Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.

I have California poppies sprouting in situ.  I have high hopes for them.

In other news, my autocarrot has gone absolutely mad.  I wrote hopes correctly, and it corrected to Hope's.  It ADDED two mistakes to a perfectly good word.


It's amazing how much autocorrupt gets wrong. It's just so counter-intuitive.

I wish you luck with the California poppies. They are so pretty!

As I may have mentioned, my back-up plan is sunflowers. My MiL gave me some seeds she got at a fundraiser, so I'll have zinnias, daisies, and marigolds too. Kind of getting in a gardening groove finally. It's nice.
 
2022-05-16 10:53:50 PM  
1 vote:
Peppers in our Earthboxes do extremely well every year. This year is no exception as jalepeno, habenero, ghost, tabasco and bell peppers all producing. The tabasco bush is at least 4 ft tall and must have over 100 pods in various stages of ripeness. One ghost plant is a holdover from last year and is yielding some really nice, large pods. Counted at least 15 pods on the jalepeno with several ready to harvest. In years past, we've had problems with whiteflies but this year amongst the pepper plants we've planted basil, mint, lemongrass and society garlic and haven't seen a one. Pics when I get a chance.
 
2022-05-17 1:46:13 AM  
1 vote:

kdawg7736: [scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net image 720x532]


Are you growing potatoes 🥔?

/you get to eat them after the harvest
 
2022-05-17 7:03:56 AM  
1 vote:
I dreamt of snow on my garden and yard last night. Woke up in a cold sweat.
 
2022-05-17 7:08:18 AM  
1 vote:
I just moved my aloe plant outside last week so I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
 
2022-05-17 7:09:03 AM  
1 vote:

AlgaeRancher: kdawg7736: [scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net image 720x532]

Are you growing potatoes 🥔?

/you get to eat them after the harvest


Lady J: kdawg7736: I am growing stuff in my parents' garden, and there is a plot at my apartment building, too. Lots of different peppers, tomatoes, corn, broccoli, and cabbage just to name a few at my parents' place. For the apartment I want to try something brave and bold but don't know what.

flowers or food?
for the brave and bold endeavour, I mean.


I would like to try potatoes. Maybe a more exotic pepper as well. So food, yes.
 
2022-05-17 7:54:02 AM  
1 vote:

Lady J: Sunidesus: Speaking of rain... how do ya'll keep track of watering and plant care notes? I am AWFUL at remembering when I did stuff so need to record it. (physical methods are better than digital for me as well)

in a... pad of paper?

[Fark user image 425x566]


I guess I'm wondering stuff like: a page for each plant? a calendar of some sort? a day planner kind of thing? 3-ring binder so pages can move around?
There are a TON of different methods people use so I'm curious what people here do. Google turns up so. many. options.

I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.
 
2022-05-17 8:01:59 AM  
1 vote:
I'm beginning to think I will never grow anything ever again. Please come in and convince me otherwise

Get yourself an AeroGarden, a hydroponic system that's pretty simple.  (Scotts MiracleGro owns the company.)
This advice is best in October, at the end of the outdoor growing season, but we use ours year-around for bok choy, lettuces and herbs -- some of which do poorly in summer heat.

You'll likely find yourself cycling the garden every 60-90 days, at least we do with the 9-slot garden.  We'll grow bok choy and lettuce over the summer but inside where they won't bolt quickly.

The real joy with the hydroponic gardens is during the short winter days when they're a bright spot of light and green.
 
2022-05-17 8:07:49 AM  
1 vote:

Endive Wombat: Bro. I got so good at growing plants during lockdown that I purchased my 1st "expensive' plant last month!

My Queen Anthurium!

[Fark user image image 425x566]

I also grow great weed

[Fark user image image 425x566]


Fark needs a flower button, at least for the gardening thread. Because those are beautiful. Not smart or funny but beautiful.
 
2022-05-17 8:10:41 AM  
1 vote:

rosekolodny: I did a thing.

I dicked around and never actually made any tomato or pepper starts when I was supposed to a couple of months ago.

So today I put dirt in a million pots and put tomato and pepper seeds in them and put happy little cloches on top.

This is a grand experiment, given that we had frost last week.

[Fark user image image 425x318]

[Fark user image image 425x318]


I like the fact they all have their own bat signal
 
2022-05-17 8:18:37 AM  
1 vote:
everything is popping last few days. Lettuces are in need of thinning out. I picked up some starts of shallot and garlic to augment my over winter crop that took a beating. Just to fill in the empty space.

all my starts are looking really good now. I think i packed them too tight when i put them in 4" pots. They all seem much happier in their beds.

Turned over a flower bed i tried a few years ago and threw some seed down. hopefully I have better success this time

radishes, zuchini, several types of lettuce, san marzanos (store bought), jalapeno, islero, gailo, spinach, broccoli rabe, inca jewels and lil bites toms.

thai and sweet basil, chives, greek oregano and thyme.

Last night we had threat of hail and tornado so had to rig up some shelters for the beds. luckily it was mostly just heavy rain but the cages with garbage bag covers i rigged held up very well
 
2022-05-17 8:58:09 AM  
1 vote:

vegas_greaser: Grow a cactus. I can grow those and I suck at gardening


And jade plants, spider plants, aloe and radishes.
 
2022-05-17 9:34:37 AM  
1 vote:

ModernPrimitive01: munkkiniemi:

If you've got slug problems, if you have an outdoor fire, use the left over ashes to form a barrier around whatever you're trying to protect. There is a lot of salt that gets made during the burning process, and slugs won't cross it. We use the same process to protect our mushroom logs. Just don't get any ashes on your plants because it'll kill them.


Thank you, I will try that!
 
2022-05-17 9:59:08 AM  
1 vote:
I'm glad to see so many gardeners here on fark. Maybe our governments planned food shortages won't be so bad lol.
 
2022-05-17 10:01:47 AM  
1 vote:

Benevolent Misanthrope: So this is what greeted me this morning as I woke up:

[Fark user image 425x566]

I love snow, but... Yeah.  May.  MID-May.

I will never garden again.  EVAR.


I'm sorry.  But I hope you will.
 
2022-05-17 10:25:51 AM  
1 vote:
Will start planting cold weather crops this week.
Lilacs leaves are happening.

The Trillium is in bloom, and got one daffodil

looking green outside
 
2022-05-17 10:51:39 AM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size

Herb bed. That big thing is lovage; it died back to the ground over the winter but started thriving in March under the hoop. (Hoops came off sunday!!!).  Lovage leaves taste like a cross between parsley and celery, and as you can see its very prolific, so i throw a handful in salads all the time.

I am still having trouble finding marjoram starts. Every place I check is either getting it on the next truck, or had some yesterday but it's already been sold.
 
2022-05-17 10:53:01 AM  
1 vote:
Peas, lettuce, Mizuno, collards, Chard doing fine. Beets struggling, no luck with celery. And the dwarf sunflowers I put along the driveway have sprouted!
 
2022-05-17 11:43:02 AM  
1 vote:

whatshisname: It's going down to 2C tomorrow night but this coming long weekend all my tomatoes are coming out of the cold frame.
I tried some tomatillos this year and they already have flowers!
Gotta get my beans and pumpkins in too.


Last time I grew tomatillos, they went apesh*t.  Decent amount of fruit, but way more plant than I knew what to do with.  I cut some tomato cages in half to try to support these monstrosities that were growing in pots on my porch.

All I know is that if I ever need to turn dirt into a million woody stems, tomatillos are the answer.

Also, I'm not sold on heirloom tomatillos. They were less pleasant than the store-bought varieties.
 
2022-05-17 1:49:52 PM  
1 vote:

Sunidesus: I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.


well... don't let perfect be the enemy of good.  it's easy to hesitate and be vaguely rubbish at making the decision, then it's... hardly worth it at this point in the year!, throw hands up dramatically, ugh failed again! and do nothing.

maybe start something 'half assed' so you haven't got nothing?  and then you'll also learn & work out what you need as you go along.  or you might realise you're too forgetful/can't be bothered, and you can quietly abandon something you didn't waste too much effort on.
 
2022-05-17 2:16:41 PM  
1 vote:
Something for those with limited space or unco operating weather. Get plastic 55 galon drums. Cut in half lengthways. Put 2x4 legs on them. If you have weird weather where snow etc may pop up. Put small wheels on two of the legs. You can put a great many of these inside a garage. Make your wife park outside lol And wheel them back out after the weather passes. Or push them all close together and take half inch pvc and rebar and build a dome over and cover in plastic. Weather passes remove plastic. Be amazed what plants will survive if protected from ice. A single heat lamp inside an enclosure will save most. I ca build a pvc and rebar green house in about 2 hours thats 15x45 for about 100 bucks.
 
2022-05-17 2:44:04 PM  
1 vote:
More garden CSBs, please?
 
2022-05-17 2:51:48 PM  
1 vote:

knobmaker: I've always wondered why exactly.


It looked weird.  When you have an idea in your head, you want the final product to match.

And it feels awful to be a full-grown adult but your parents won't stop treating you like a child.  Every time my mother comes over and starts doing my dishes, I want to murder her.  F*ck you.  Do your own dishes.  Leave my kitchen alone.
 
2022-05-17 3:33:28 PM  
1 vote:

rosekolodny: knobmaker: I've always wondered why exactly.

It looked weird.  When you have an idea in your head, you want the final product to match.

And it feels awful to be a full-grown adult but your parents won't stop treating you like a child.  Every time my mother comes over and starts doing my dishes, I want to murder her.  F*ck you.  Do your own dishes.  Leave my kitchen alone.


I caught my mother in law using soap on my cast iron skillet once. I love my wife, but I could have divorced her whole family right then and there
 
2022-05-17 4:22:45 PM  
1 vote:

Metal1951: Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.

Diatomaceous earth works good on insects, it is non poisonous and is like broken glass to insects. It is inexpensive and you can get it at pool supply stores ( used in pool filters).
If you are getting professional help, they should be able to spread "bait" for the ants to take to the queen.


Thank you! Yes, I've been targeting various areas with the DE. I picked up a big bag last summer and it worked then. It's working now in some places and not in others. Probably not enough coverage. The ants appear to have made a nice home in the house's foundation and are still getting in the house. I've been killing ants all day.

Not much choice but to wait to see what the pros say. Thanks again for the info.
 
2022-05-17 4:42:49 PM  
1 vote:
oh, lily beetles are out of control.
I've killed 10-15... most yrs I don't even see them.  probably partly due to increased vigilance this yr, but must also be cos they're hella prolific.

anyway.  stumbled across a brilliant blog post on the internets, and so I also knew what the eggs & larvae look like.  and would you adam and eve it...

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tiny orange tings are eggz, gross black turdlike objects are da larvae.

little.  farkers.

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2022-05-17 6:02:41 PM  
1 vote:
Herbal overload! Tons of mint, thyme, and orange thyme.
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2022-05-17 6:28:57 PM  
1 vote:
I just went out to water the garden and saw my grapevine. This is only a 1 foot section but if every clump I see produces, I am going to have a bumper crop this year. It is budding out all over.

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This is the overall size of the vine.

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2022-05-17 9:17:26 PM  
1 vote:
Nice.  We've ordered a freeze-dryer.  I hope it gets here by strawberry season.  I've got a 50 foot bed of the little jewels this year, if I can fight off the weeds.

I have a terrible sweet tooth.  It's all Mrs. knobmaker can do to keep me from making fudge every night.  I'm looking to freeze-dried strawberries for salvation.  The ones I got at Fresh Market were pretty good.  Also the spicy freeze-dried green beans-- we will soon have vast amounts of them.

Anyone here have any experience with freeze-driers?

catmandu: Wine? Juice? I make grape jam which I prefer over jelly. I often give my assorted jelly, jam, vinegars, and chutney as Christmas gifts.


Vinegars!  That is a really good idea.  We do a lot of Asian inspired cooking and in that cuisine, good vinegars are essential or so it seems to me.  And would make good gifts for friends and family, too.  I wonder if Concord vinegar tastes anything like wine grape vinegar.
 
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