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(Fark)   I'm beginning to think I will never grow anything ever again. Please come in and convince me otherwise in your weekly Fark gardening thread for Tuesday May 17, 2022   (fark.com) divider line
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408 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 May 2022 at 7:00 AM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-17 11:23:37 AM  

patrick767: AlgaeRancher: Anybody got tips on how to best deal with unwelcome vines?

[Fark user image image 200x200]

I have no special tricks. I just remember that when we moved into the current house in the fall a few years there were thick mats of dead vines covering a sizable wooded section of our backyard. The prior owner had nuked the area with some kind of herbicide. I cleared out a ridiculous quantity of dead vines. It appeared to have killed everything, but as I learned the following spring, that didn't stop the winter creeper. I've been pulling and digging it out of the ground ever since.

That first year was the worst. It still comes up here and there, but far, far less. I pull maybe a dozen sprouts a week this time and year and less later. Persistence. If I let it go, it would take over again.

Now that area is stuff we've planted and other native plants that got there on their own instead of a huge mat of winter creeper. Okay, the hostas and coral bells we planted aren't native, but we've added columbine, may apples, wild geranium, ginger, a little Virginia creeper (that I will not let take over), ferns, and I forget what else that are native.

Winter creeper? EXTERMINATE!


I hate Virginia Creeper, but my landlord loves it.

I'm rooting a bunch of it for him right now, and I find it absolutely baffling that anyone would plant it on purpose.  Whatever. He can do what he wants.
 
2022-05-17 11:29:53 AM  

rosekolodny: The perennial herbs are looking good.

[Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x318][Fark user image 425x566]


Have you ever made chive blossom vinegar? Take a handful of washed blossoms, heat up some white vinegar, put the blossoms in and let them steep for a week or two. Strain, then bottle. It is a nice sweet onioney flavor (kind of like the brine for cocktail onions), pretty pink-ish purple color, and makes great salad dressings and marinades.

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2022-05-17 11:31:35 AM  

FrancoFile: ModernPrimitive01: [Fark user image image 355x471]
I'm currently swimming in radishes. Basically it's radishes with every meal at this point.
[Fark user image image 320x238]
The peas are also taking off

I've had luck making radish pickles, using a basic bread-and-butter recipe. You might give that a whirl and put some up to go with pulled pork in the fall and winter.


Thanks for the tip! I've done quick pickled radishes. This year I may have to do something more substantial
 
2022-05-17 11:34:10 AM  

catmandu: rosekolodny: The perennial herbs are looking good.

[Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x318][Fark user image 425x566]

Have you ever made chive blossom vinegar? Take a handful of washed blossoms, heat up some white vinegar, put the blossoms in and let them steep for a week or two. Strain, then bottle. It is a nice sweet onioney flavor (kind of like the brine for cocktail onions), pretty pink-ish purple color, and makes great salad dressings and marinades.

[Fark user image image 720x960]


Lol I was going to ask you about that.  I already had you Farkied as "chive blossom vinegar."

I will definitely try it.

Although do I do kind of hate to not maximize the number of seeds that I have for next year.  Logically, of course, I know that I will find a million chive seeds at the store and not a single chive blossom.
 
2022-05-17 11:37:37 AM  

rosekolodny: catmandu: rosekolodny: The perennial herbs are looking good.

[Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x566][Fark user image 425x318][Fark user image 425x566]

Have you ever made chive blossom vinegar? Take a handful of washed blossoms, heat up some white vinegar, put the blossoms in and let them steep for a week or two. Strain, then bottle. It is a nice sweet onioney flavor (kind of like the brine for cocktail onions), pretty pink-ish purple color, and makes great salad dressings and marinades.

[Fark user image image 720x960]

Lol I was going to ask you about that.  I already had you Farkied as "chive blossom vinegar."

I will definitely try it.

Although do I do kind of hate to not maximize the number of seeds that I have for next year.  Logically, of course, I know that I will find a million chive seeds at the store and not a single chive blossom.


I looks like you have enough to do both. Use some of the blossoms for vinegar and some for seed.
 
2022-05-17 11:39:43 AM  
Mostly things are just growing. It's nice enough to sit outside in the evening.
This year's tomato is flowering:
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Last year's tomato is showing a growth spurt. I'm going to try and root a cutting from it later this fall:

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Shade side:

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Sunny side.  The pea plant on the left was going to go into the compost bin but it started new growth on the top so I'll leave it.  It's also the aphid sacrifice plant.  I got them under control on the other plants with a soap spray but it's not supposed to be used on peas.

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The potato pots are going like gangbusters.

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/zone 9b
 
2022-05-17 11:43:02 AM  

whatshisname: It's going down to 2C tomorrow night but this coming long weekend all my tomatoes are coming out of the cold frame.
I tried some tomatillos this year and they already have flowers!
Gotta get my beans and pumpkins in too.


Last time I grew tomatillos, they went apesh*t.  Decent amount of fruit, but way more plant than I knew what to do with.  I cut some tomato cages in half to try to support these monstrosities that were growing in pots on my porch.

All I know is that if I ever need to turn dirt into a million woody stems, tomatillos are the answer.

Also, I'm not sold on heirloom tomatillos. They were less pleasant than the store-bought varieties.
 
2022-05-17 11:44:47 AM  
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Lilac. Needs pruning
 
2022-05-17 11:57:45 AM  
Our forecast is for snow starting Wednesday night and lasting through the end of the week.
My plants are forming gangs and I think some major trouble is going down if they don't get out soon.
 
2022-05-17 12:29:25 PM  
My dream house.

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2022-05-17 12:34:12 PM  
The newest blooms are the elderberry, gaura. Deer keep chomping on the Campanula buds before they open, and the Lysmachia cordifolia is trying to take over the world. The elderberry also is a climbing tree for passiflora edulus, which has been blooming for a few weeks.

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2022-05-17 12:35:46 PM  
The irises are blooming. The tulips are spent. There's a pretty happy brunnera on the lower right, and I'm too lazy to go take another pic sans finger. 
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2022-05-17 12:52:56 PM  
Old trick for  city dwellers: a pallet garden.   Get two pallets.  Sacrifice one to fill the gaps on the bottom of the good pallet.  Line with garden cloth.  Fill with dirt and manure.  Plant herbs and some small flowers in between the slats.  Once everything's rooted, you can leave it lying flat OR turn it on one side  and wire to a post.  Herbs will keep growing all summer and into the fall, ready to pick.  You can even grow one on an apartment balcony!
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2022-05-17 1:32:41 PM  

Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.


Diatomaceous earth works good on insects, it is non poisonous and is like broken glass to insects. It is inexpensive and you can get it at pool supply stores ( used in pool filters).
If you are getting professional help, they should be able to spread "bait" for the ants to take to the queen.
 
2022-05-17 1:49:52 PM  

Sunidesus: I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.


well... don't let perfect be the enemy of good.  it's easy to hesitate and be vaguely rubbish at making the decision, then it's... hardly worth it at this point in the year!, throw hands up dramatically, ugh failed again! and do nothing.

maybe start something 'half assed' so you haven't got nothing?  and then you'll also learn & work out what you need as you go along.  or you might realise you're too forgetful/can't be bothered, and you can quietly abandon something you didn't waste too much effort on.
 
2022-05-17 2:09:38 PM  

EmperorSled: AlgaeRancher: cretinbob: I got a job doing cemetery grounds keeping last week...
I'm so sore and it feels so good

I am glad the topic of discussion is gardening.

Otherwise that statement sounds... wrong


Anybody got tips on how to best deal with unwelcome vines?

What's the problem? Too close to other plants for spraying vegetation killer, or just don't want to use chemicals? If it's the first, I saw a tip on This Old House once, use a paint brush and "paint" the killer on the leaves. If it's the second, I don't know; I just use the chemicals. The vines I deal with aren't near anything I'm going to eat. (Although I did almost kill the lilac bushes with it last year, but they're still going.)


they grow up near plants I want to keep

Painting herbicide is a great suggestion, thank you!
 
2022-05-17 2:11:25 PM  
Some of the best memories of my life were spent in a garden with my family. My great grandfather had a huge farm of several hundred acres. It would be 98 degrees and walking behind his tractor feeling the cool soil on my feet and the smell of fresh turned earth was amazing. I can still smell it and feel it 45 yrs later.

He primarily grew corn. He had won numerous awards and competitions growing up in the 20s 30s etc with corn he grew. Yes this was a matter of pride back in his day before factory farming took over the world. In the late 60s through mid 80s I spent with him and my grandparents and my great grandmother farming. Hard work dark til dark. And I was a kid. Wouldnt trade it for anything.

My grandmother..his daughter..my mothers mother was said to be able to "lay a seed on a slab of granite and still get it to grow" and although an obvious embellishment she was almost supernatural in her abilities to grow anything under any circumstance.

Look into heirloom varieties of corn. People are amazed at the difference. I remember biting into corn on the cob so juicy it would pop and it wasnt unusual for the juice to squirt your sister across the table. Sweet and juicy. Not bland like today.

Heirloom varieties of tomato etc are all much better tasting.

I cant grow a garden like I used to. I used to keep 4 acres of squash okra peas beans etc. I cut way back to about an acre and half now and probably smaller next year unless I back off other job responsibilities.

Sometimes its true it cost more to grow....but the flavor and lack of chemicals is well worth the difference. I do still plant copious acres of corn for my cattle etc. But for home usage I just dont have the time any more
 
2022-05-17 2:16:41 PM  
Something for those with limited space or unco operating weather. Get plastic 55 galon drums. Cut in half lengthways. Put 2x4 legs on them. If you have weird weather where snow etc may pop up. Put small wheels on two of the legs. You can put a great many of these inside a garage. Make your wife park outside lol And wheel them back out after the weather passes. Or push them all close together and take half inch pvc and rebar and build a dome over and cover in plastic. Weather passes remove plastic. Be amazed what plants will survive if protected from ice. A single heat lamp inside an enclosure will save most. I ca build a pvc and rebar green house in about 2 hours thats 15x45 for about 100 bucks.
 
2022-05-17 2:21:05 PM  

thrillbilly1967: Some of the best memories of my life were spent in a garden with my family. My great grandfather had a huge farm of several hundred acres. It would be 98 degrees and walking behind his tractor feeling the cool soil on my feet and the smell of fresh turned earth was amazing. I can still smell it and feel it 45 yrs later.

He primarily grew corn. He had won numerous awards and competitions growing up in the 20s 30s etc with corn he grew. Yes this was a matter of pride back in his day before factory farming took over the world. In the late 60s through mid 80s I spent with him and my grandparents and my great grandmother farming. Hard work dark til dark. And I was a kid. Wouldnt trade it for anything.

My grandmother..his daughter..my mothers mother was said to be able to "lay a seed on a slab of granite and still get it to grow" and although an obvious embellishment she was almost supernatural in her abilities to grow anything under any circumstance.

Look into heirloom varieties of corn. People are amazed at the difference. I remember biting into corn on the cob so juicy it would pop and it wasnt unusual for the juice to squirt your sister across the table. Sweet and juicy. Not bland like today.

Heirloom varieties of tomato etc are all much better tasting.

I cant grow a garden like I used to. I used to keep 4 acres of squash okra peas beans etc. I cut way back to about an acre and half now and probably smaller next year unless I back off other job responsibilities.

Sometimes its true it cost more to grow....but the flavor and lack of chemicals is well worth the difference. I do still plant copious acres of corn for my cattle etc. But for home usage I just dont have the time any more


Very CSB.

Similarly reaching back through time -
My dad was apprenticed to his uncle the blacksmith. There was a local farmer who competed in the world plowing competitions. Which is a thing. Held in Kansas one year, then Argentina, then Australia, etc. Before every contest he'd go to my great uncle to get all his gear sharpened. Plowshare, harrows, etc.  Wouldn't have anyone else touch his stuff, not even the John Deere reps who sponsored the thing.
 
2022-05-17 2:28:49 PM  

claytonemery: Old trick for  city dwellers: a pallet garden.   Get two pallets.  Sacrifice one to fill the gaps on the bottom of the good pallet.  Line with garden cloth.  Fill with dirt and manure.  Plant herbs and some small flowers in between the slats.  Once everything's rooted, you can leave it lying flat OR turn it on one side  and wire to a post.  Herbs will keep growing all summer and into the fall, ready to pick.  You can even grow one on an apartment balcony![Fark user image image 850x637]


That's brilliant.
 
2022-05-17 2:30:12 PM  

Lady J: Sunidesus: I do realize I'm over-thinking things, but I accepted a while ago that that is my nature and it isn't worth fighting it.

well... don't let perfect be the enemy of good.  it's easy to hesitate and be vaguely rubbish at making the decision, then it's... hardly worth it at this point in the year!, throw hands up dramatically, ugh failed again! and do nothing.

maybe start something 'half assed' so you haven't got nothing?  and then you'll also learn & work out what you need as you go along.  or you might realise you're too forgetful/can't be bothered, and you can quietly abandon something you didn't waste too much effort on.


YEP.  That's why I went whole-hog yesterday and planted ALL THE THINGS.  They'll make some fruit and can totally overwinter in the garage.  Worst case scenario, I have a head start on next year.
 
2022-05-17 2:34:54 PM  
Oh hey, since I've got you all here, what's this thing called?  It makes pretty flowers and is super robust and invasive.  Either needs zero water, or has the technology to tap into the city system.

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2022-05-17 2:37:32 PM  

thrillbilly1967: Something for those with limited space or unco operating weather. Get plastic 55 galon drums. Cut in half lengthways. Put 2x4 legs on them. If you have weird weather where snow etc may pop up. Put small wheels on two of the legs. You can put a great many of these inside a garage. Make your wife park outside lol And wheel them back out after the weather passes. Or push them all close together and take half inch pvc and rebar and build a dome over and cover in plastic. Weather passes remove plastic. Be amazed what plants will survive if protected from ice. A single heat lamp inside an enclosure will save most. I ca build a pvc and rebar green house in about 2 hours thats 15x45 for about 100 bucks.


I think I might put some wheels on pallets to bring all the pots in and out of the garage when the winter comes around.

I'll need to get a wife, if I'm making her park outside.
 
2022-05-17 2:41:16 PM  
Okay, I have a garden-related CSB, maybe.

When I was a little boy, my grandparents came to visit us.  We were living in the west at the time, and the backyard was caliche with a thin layer of hauled-in topsoil.

Now, my grandfather was a scientist, and he decided to help my father make a garden.  He organized the backyard into beds that would be watered by little canals, just like the fields of produce growing out in the irrigated desert.  It was really pretty cool.

My father was a wonderful man, a veteran of WW II, and as gentle a person as I have ever met.

As soon as my grandfather went back to NY, my father leveled all the beds and destroyed the irrigation system and planted his garden just like he'd always planted gardens.  I've always wondered why exactly.  I never asked him, thinking that it might be a sore spot.  But my father, as handsome and brilliant as he was, was a half-Cherokee from Apache, Oklahoma, who had by a quirk of the war met and married a princess from the upstate NY gentility.

I've sometimes had the same emotion when folks try to teach me stuff I think I already know.

Often, it turns out, I don't know.
 
2022-05-17 2:43:37 PM  

rosekolodny: I hate Virginia Creeper, but my landlord loves it.

I'm rooting a bunch of it for him right now, and I find it absolutely baffling that anyone would plant it on purpose.  Whatever. He can do what he wants.


heh... yes, I planted some on purpose. It's native here and we like it. After a couple years it's still quite small. At some point it may really take off and then the trick may be to contain it. But winter creeper? GAH! I hate that shiat.
 
2022-05-17 2:44:04 PM  
More garden CSBs, please?
 
2022-05-17 2:51:48 PM  

knobmaker: I've always wondered why exactly.


It looked weird.  When you have an idea in your head, you want the final product to match.

And it feels awful to be a full-grown adult but your parents won't stop treating you like a child.  Every time my mother comes over and starts doing my dishes, I want to murder her.  F*ck you.  Do your own dishes.  Leave my kitchen alone.
 
2022-05-17 2:57:40 PM  

Wendigogo: The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.


Okay, this may be relevant to my interests. Do the ants ruin any of the plants? We've had a increasingly huge ant colony on one side of the house partially in a landscape bed where we've not planted much. It's mostly just some old hostas. But the hosta closest to the colony never grows much. Is it the ants? There's also a years old colony in the lawn that's left a bare patch where nothing grows.

Now we have a new ant colony by the front sidewalk and even though the colony started recently, an herb growing nearby is already looking the worse for wear.

For some reason I hate to exterminate the ants, but I don't want them killing our plants. Googled it and some websites say ants are mostly fine in the garden. They aerate the soil, control pests, and improve pollination rates. But I'd swear the plants near these big colonies are not doing well.
 
2022-05-17 3:28:21 PM  

rosekolodny: knobmaker: I've always wondered why exactly.

It looked weird.  When you have an idea in your head, you want the final product to match.

And it feels awful to be a full-grown adult but your parents won't stop treating you like a child.  Every time my mother comes over and starts doing my dishes, I want to murder her.  F*ck you.  Do your own dishes.  Leave my kitchen alone.


I get it.

It's a short CSB, but I like it.
 
2022-05-17 3:33:28 PM  

rosekolodny: knobmaker: I've always wondered why exactly.

It looked weird.  When you have an idea in your head, you want the final product to match.

And it feels awful to be a full-grown adult but your parents won't stop treating you like a child.  Every time my mother comes over and starts doing my dishes, I want to murder her.  F*ck you.  Do your own dishes.  Leave my kitchen alone.


I caught my mother in law using soap on my cast iron skillet once. I love my wife, but I could have divorced her whole family right then and there
 
2022-05-17 3:46:49 PM  
Did somebody say potatoes?
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Left Sarpo Mira, two weeks after Charlotte, right. I gambled on starting the Charlottes as early as possible and it's come off, not a hint of frost now.

Strawberries with some Pak Choi taking up the space:
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Back to front:
Onions, japanese and red spring,
Beetroot,
Carrots,
Spinach with a couple of volunteer Pentland Javelin potatoes (I disliked these for flavour and texture so if these are the same I'll make sure to excavate them all this time),
More Pak Choi,
Radishes,
Broad beans
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Sown in cold frame from this weekend are:
Kale, spinach, swiss chard, Pak Choi, basil, coriander, radish
 
2022-05-17 4:22:45 PM  

Metal1951: Wendigogo: I kicked some gardening arse this weekend and planted some poppy seeds. As mentioned in another thread, it'll be interesting to see if they actually grow. My lilac bush is in full bloom, no thanks to me.

The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.

Diatomaceous earth works good on insects, it is non poisonous and is like broken glass to insects. It is inexpensive and you can get it at pool supply stores ( used in pool filters).
If you are getting professional help, they should be able to spread "bait" for the ants to take to the queen.


Thank you! Yes, I've been targeting various areas with the DE. I picked up a big bag last summer and it worked then. It's working now in some places and not in others. Probably not enough coverage. The ants appear to have made a nice home in the house's foundation and are still getting in the house. I've been killing ants all day.

Not much choice but to wait to see what the pros say. Thanks again for the info.
 
2022-05-17 4:25:19 PM  

patrick767: Wendigogo: The garden bed at the front of the house is overrun with ants. So I'm looking into ways to deal with that. We have pest control coming out this week.  Any other advice is appreciated.

Okay, this may be relevant to my interests. Do the ants ruin any of the plants? We've had a increasingly huge ant colony on one side of the house partially in a landscape bed where we've not planted much. It's mostly just some old hostas. But the hosta closest to the colony never grows much. Is it the ants? There's also a years old colony in the lawn that's left a bare patch where nothing grows.

Now we have a new ant colony by the front sidewalk and even though the colony started recently, an herb growing nearby is already looking the worse for wear.

For some reason I hate to exterminate the ants, but I don't want them killing our plants. Googled it and some websites say ants are mostly fine in the garden. They aerate the soil, control pests, and improve pollination rates. But I'd swear the plants near these big colonies are not doing well.


At the front of the house, we don't have anything other than grass right now. It does look sparse and it's so dry it's cracked. I'll find out soon enough if they ruin some of our plants.
 
2022-05-17 4:36:21 PM  

rosekolodny: Oh hey, since I've got you all here, what's this thing called?  It makes pretty flowers and is super robust and invasive.  Either needs zero water, or has the technology to tap into the city system.

[Fark user image image 425x566]

[Fark user image image 425x566]


it looks like an epiphyte... species that lives/relies on another organism, like relatively harmless parasite.

there are lots that grow on trees, like that appears to be.
 
2022-05-17 4:40:37 PM  
OK I DONE IT.

16oz or so white wine vinegar, 1/4 cup ume plum vinegar, and topped off with regular distilled vinegar.

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2022-05-17 4:42:49 PM  
oh, lily beetles are out of control.
I've killed 10-15... most yrs I don't even see them.  probably partly due to increased vigilance this yr, but must also be cos they're hella prolific.

anyway.  stumbled across a brilliant blog post on the internets, and so I also knew what the eggs & larvae look like.  and would you adam and eve it...

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tiny orange tings are eggz, gross black turdlike objects are da larvae.

little.  farkers.

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2022-05-17 5:56:17 PM  
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2022-05-17 5:59:11 PM  
Pods of death ripening. This ghost pepper plant survived from last year and is producing nice fruit.
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2022-05-17 6:02:41 PM  
Herbal overload! Tons of mint, thyme, and orange thyme.
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2022-05-17 6:05:07 PM  
This Tabasco plant is over 4ft tall and prolific. 
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2022-05-17 6:08:15 PM  

beerrun: This Tabasco plant is over 4ft tall and prolific. [Fark user image image 422x750]


holy crap!  looks like Poison Ivy's staircase
 
2022-05-17 6:22:46 PM  

knobmaker: More garden CSBs, please?


I was about 10 when I got my first garden. There was a space under a tree that was maybe 2ft x 3 ft and Mom told me I could plant anything. I love violets and the wood violet grows every where (it is even the state flower). Anyway, I dug up violet plants when I saw them and transplanted them into the space. Mom had prepped the soil just like she did with her garden so it was nice and rich. Those plants came back every year and produced blossoms the size of silver dollars!

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2022-05-17 6:28:57 PM  
I just went out to water the garden and saw my grapevine. This is only a 1 foot section but if every clump I see produces, I am going to have a bumper crop this year. It is budding out all over.

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This is the overall size of the vine.

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2022-05-17 7:31:07 PM  
My birdhouse needed a plant too.

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2022-05-17 7:41:50 PM  

catmandu: I just went out to water the garden and saw my grapevine. This is only a 1 foot section but if every clump I see produces, I am going to have a bumper crop this year. It is budding out all over.

[Fark user image 850x595]
many Concords.
This is the overall size of the vine.

[Fark user image 850x681]


Last summer I rooted a bunch of grape cuttings and this spring I put out the rooted ones in the garden.  I'm beginning to wonder how I'm going to use so many Concords.  Last year was the first year the original two vines bore a good crop that the critters didn't immediately consume, and I made grape jelly until I got sick of it.
 
2022-05-17 8:00:44 PM  

knobmaker: catmandu: I just went out to water the garden and saw my grapevine. This is only a 1 foot section but if every clump I see produces, I am going to have a bumper crop this year. It is budding out all over.

[Fark user image 850x595]
many Concords.
This is the overall size of the vine.

[Fark user image 850x681]

Last summer I rooted a bunch of grape cuttings and this spring I put out the rooted ones in the garden.  I'm beginning to wonder how I'm going to use so many Concords.  Last year was the first year the original two vines bore a good crop that the critters didn't immediately consume, and I made grape jelly until I got sick of it.


Wine? Juice? I make grape jam which I prefer over jelly. I often give my assorted jelly, jam, vinegars, and chutney as Christmas gifts.
 
2022-05-17 8:35:26 PM  

catmandu: knobmaker: catmandu: I just went out to water the garden and saw my grapevine. This is only a 1 foot section but if every clump I see produces, I am going to have a bumper crop this year. It is budding out all over.

[Fark user image 850x595]
many Concords.
This is the overall size of the vine.

[Fark user image 850x681]

Last summer I rooted a bunch of grape cuttings and this spring I put out the rooted ones in the garden.  I'm beginning to wonder how I'm going to use so many Concords.  Last year was the first year the original two vines bore a good crop that the critters didn't immediately consume, and I made grape jelly until I got sick of it.

Wine? Juice? I make grape jam which I prefer over jelly. I often give my assorted jelly, jam, vinegars, and chutney as Christmas gifts.


Yep!

This year I'm aiming for homemade
- Nam prik pao
- Hot sauce
- Chili crisp
- Jerky

Maybe something like oil-preserved tomatoes if I can work out how to process them correctly.
 
2022-05-17 8:38:23 PM  
Like these delicious tomato candies!

Tomato Confit Recipe
Youtube y1mo7ZFxKQE
 
2022-05-17 9:17:26 PM  
Nice.  We've ordered a freeze-dryer.  I hope it gets here by strawberry season.  I've got a 50 foot bed of the little jewels this year, if I can fight off the weeds.

I have a terrible sweet tooth.  It's all Mrs. knobmaker can do to keep me from making fudge every night.  I'm looking to freeze-dried strawberries for salvation.  The ones I got at Fresh Market were pretty good.  Also the spicy freeze-dried green beans-- we will soon have vast amounts of them.

Anyone here have any experience with freeze-driers?

catmandu: Wine? Juice? I make grape jam which I prefer over jelly. I often give my assorted jelly, jam, vinegars, and chutney as Christmas gifts.


Vinegars!  That is a really good idea.  We do a lot of Asian inspired cooking and in that cuisine, good vinegars are essential or so it seems to me.  And would make good gifts for friends and family, too.  I wonder if Concord vinegar tastes anything like wine grape vinegar.
 
2022-05-17 9:27:17 PM  

August11: Wine Sipping Elitist: August11: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Sugar Rush Peach peppers. More marigold soldiers.

Those are some nice beds! I plan on taking down the privacy fence, leaving the posts up and having beds of perennial asparagus between the posts and have vines of some sort on a trellis. I can't find the video, but it was a no till method of laying down topsoil and then a layer of hay and planting the potatoes/asparagus/whatever by pushing them through the layer of hay.

Here's the video that started me down the no till path. It's fascinating

[YouTube video: Treating the Farm as an Ecosystem with Gabe Brown Part 1, The 5 Tenets of Soil Health]

I tried the Ruth Stout method for the past few years but I couldn't get it to work. There is a video of her and her no till method out there. She literally just throws the seed potatoes on the ground and then throws a clump of spoiled hay over them. I went back to the bucket method. I hope you get it to work.


That description sounds lazy and only half the story. Layering soil and hay year after year and using cover crops when not growing veggies to keep the soil "alive" is the way to go.

So far, so good. I'm making some beds like you (and some inspiration from other farkers in this thread) on top of the soil. I'll let you know how it goes in a few years.

Cheers
 
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