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(NPR)   NPR's handy online tool to help you determine if your house is at risk of wildfire. Although you have to scroll all the way down to the bottom to use the tool, so subby will just save you the effort with a quick preview of its likely answer: Yes   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Scary, Contiguous United States, wildfire risk, Insurance, Flood, much vegetation, Federal maps, Tom Grossman, one-page form  
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2594 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 May 2022 at 10:50 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



65 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


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2022-05-16 9:11:31 AM  
Fairfield County, no increased risk!

Booyah!

/Will probably die in a blizzard related power outage
 
2022-05-16 10:54:27 AM  
"No meaningful risk"

I guess they're not factoring in the tweakers with their meth labs.
 
2022-05-16 10:54:44 AM  
Eh, if the golf course (it's a muni folks, put down the pitchforks) burns everything else probably burned first.
 
2022-05-16 10:54:58 AM  
No meaningful risk.

Suck it, fire jockeys!
 
2022-05-16 10:56:04 AM  
It looks like there's some inherent protection from the the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, along with maple trees.
 
2022-05-16 10:57:01 AM  
"No meaningful risk"

SE PA is going to be a swampy rainforest in 50 years.
 
2022-05-16 10:58:23 AM  
"You'll be flooded out long before any meaningful risk."
 
2022-05-16 10:59:58 AM  
oh look, a heat map of where trees are.
 
2022-05-16 11:00:55 AM  
I already know my risk. I'm on the edge of town in the Pacific Northwest. Thankfully I'm on the edge of town that is surrounded by agriculture and not trees. But still the risk is elevated because it's largely grass they grow. Hay and straw and that sort of thing.
 
2022-05-16 11:03:00 AM  
Carbon Count 38% increase. I'm not surprised. The mountain is on fire at least 3 times a year. If it happened though, it will because of the guy at the end of the block that likes to shoot off fireworks all year long.
 
2022-05-16 11:04:39 AM  
Thanks jackholes, will be looking forward to my home owners insurance going up now that they have this handy new tool to point to as an excuse to raise rates.
 
2022-05-16 11:05:25 AM  
There is nothing to burn in the Phoenix Valley. 10-15 miles east or north might flash up anytime, but I am quite safe.
 
2022-05-16 11:08:29 AM  
Considering I'm used to seeing local waste fields smolder off and on throughout summer, I trust that uncontrolled burning is part of their comprehensive fire protection plan.
 
2022-05-16 11:12:18 AM  
In Montana, my home insurer just added coverage (and no additional premium) for fuel reduction, sprinklers and spraying fire-retardant gel, among other items.
I guess they're getting tired of customers' homes going up in flames.
 
2022-05-16 11:16:29 AM  
Do you see shiat on fire?
Then yes.
 
2022-05-16 11:17:37 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 11:21:32 AM  
0%
 
2022-05-16 11:23:37 AM  
Never figured Downtown Chicago to be a wild fire risk.  Other types of "wild" fire, sure.  But I do not think that is what was being discussed in the article.
 
2022-05-16 11:26:16 AM  

Boooozy: Never figured Downtown Chicago to be a wild fire risk.  Other types of "wild" fire, sure.  But I do not think that is what was being discussed in the article.


Mrs. O'Leary's cow would beg to differ.
 
2022-05-16 11:26:25 AM  
Hahahhaaaa.  Remember when they told us about climate change and you all were like, "Yeah, but isn't that only going to affect, like, poor people, and people on the other side of the world?"

Look on your works  and despair.  This is what everybody paid for.  This is what your big pretty house is all ABOUT.
 
2022-05-16 11:30:30 AM  
The Forest Raking Brigade needs YOU!
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size

JOIN NOW!
 
2022-05-16 11:32:15 AM  
Uh, this thing says in 30 years there's a 99% chance of flood risk. I'm gonna call BS on that, I mean, I've lived in this area for almost 50 years. We've never had anything close to what would be considered a flood.
 
2022-05-16 11:37:44 AM  
79% chance of increased wildfire risk in our current location, no meaningful risk a couple counties to the east (45 minutes drive time) where we just put in a bid on a house.  Seems odd considering when we get rain, they typically get rain as well.

Hoping we get it.  First order of business would be to install solar, which our current HOA doesn't allow (new house isn't part of one, so we can do what we want).
 
2022-05-16 11:40:00 AM  

Zizzowop: Uh, this thing says in 30 years there's a 99% chance of flood risk. I'm gonna call BS on that, I mean, I've lived in this area for almost 50 years. We've never had anything close to what would be considered a flood.


My parents had 2 inches (street had been repaved but not torn up before it was paved over, so the road level was like 2 inches higher than it used to be, so their driveway, that pitched down, didn't have as much curb to keep the water from their driveway if the storm drain couldn't immediately handle all of it) of water once in 32 years. Then they had 5.5 feet last year. This time it was a culvert 500 yards away that couldn't handle the water. No real change in houses or roads around them (no new houses or developments near them, as they live in the NYC suburbs...so the town is pretty old and hasn't changed much layoutwise)

So yeah, to;dr, floods can happen outta nowhere now.
 
2022-05-16 11:42:23 AM  
While this does say no meaningful risk, the number of local meth labs and, perhaps more importantly, the number of drunken idiots setting off fireworks, was not likely factored in.  We have a lot of both.
 
2022-05-16 11:44:00 AM  

SpectroBoy: Fairfield County, no increased risk!

Booyah!

/Will probably die in a blizzard related power outage


Both our current home, and the home we are finishing up to retire to: No risk.
 
2022-05-16 11:51:10 AM  
County by county is worthless.  A house in a county can be in a forest, or in the middle of 20 acres of mown watered grass.
 
2022-05-16 11:54:41 AM  
Since I already had to evacuate my home in 2018, I'm pretty sure I don't need to RTFA to know I'm at risk.
 
2022-05-16 11:59:12 AM  

orneryredguy: Boooozy: Never figured Downtown Chicago to be a wild fire risk.  Other types of "wild" fire, sure.  But I do not think that is what was being discussed in the article.

Mrs. O'Leary's cow would beg to differ.


I believe that was more of an urban fire.
 
2022-05-16 12:02:04 PM  
Salem, OR - very low risk of wildfire, lots of smoke though if the wind is from the east.
Flooding?  We are 300 feet above the river and 20 feet above most of the houses in the neighborhood.
 
2022-05-16 12:05:53 PM  

RogermcAllen: orneryredguy: Boooozy: Never figured Downtown Chicago to be a wild fire risk.  Other types of "wild" fire, sure.  But I do not think that is what was being discussed in the article.

Mrs. O'Leary's cow would beg to differ.

I believe that was more of an urban fire.


Point taken.  It all comes down to how you define wildfire.  And even though this is Fark, I'm not inclined to get into a meaningless argument over a semantic difference. :)
 
2022-05-16 12:22:28 PM  
When Louisville/Broomfield burned a few months ago, we could see the glow over a ridge to the south, and we've been put on alert 'cause of a grass fire north of us since then. So, yeah, we're just hoping the reservoir and irrigated farmland to our west will work as an adequate fire break.
 
2022-05-16 12:24:25 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 12:34:20 PM  
Do urban centers have wildfires?
 
2022-05-16 12:37:29 PM  

ar393: Zizzowop: Uh, this thing says in 30 years there's a 99% chance of flood risk. I'm gonna call BS on that, I mean, I've lived in this area for almost 50 years. We've never had anything close to what would be considered a flood.

My parents had 2 inches (street had been repaved but not torn up before it was paved over, so the road level was like 2 inches higher than it used to be, so their driveway, that pitched down, didn't have as much curb to keep the water from their driveway if the storm drain couldn't immediately handle all of it) of water once in 32 years. Then they had 5.5 feet last year. This time it was a culvert 500 yards away that couldn't handle the water. No real change in houses or roads around them (no new houses or developments near them, as they live in the NYC suburbs...so the town is pretty old and hasn't changed much layoutwise)

So yeah, to;dr, floods can happen outta nowhere now.


The more I thought about it, I know what they're referring to. I live smack in the middle of silicone valley (yes, I spell it that way on purpose) and I often forget we're kind of close to the very edge of the SF bay-like the wetlands area of the bay. With sea levels rising, they probably figure it will invade where I'm at, which makes sense. I'll be long gone from here by then.
 
2022-05-16 12:39:40 PM  
Nope no chance at the moment. With climate change that may sightly increase, but who knows. I have far more chance of damage from heavy winds, ice or rain, but not flooding.
 
2022-05-16 12:45:47 PM  

DarnoKonrad: oh look, a heat map of where trees are.


Northeast has trees, it's just too soggy for them to burn much.
 
2022-05-16 12:46:55 PM  

Thenixon: Northeast has trees, it's just too soggy for them to burn much.


That and I've been raking the forest floor.
 
2022-05-16 12:49:14 PM  

SpectroBoy: Fairfield County, no increased risk!

Booyah!

/Will probably die in a blizzard related power outage


Neighbor!

I also checked the flood zone map. Good there, too. It helps that I live at one of the highest points in town, three miles from the shore.
 
2022-05-16 12:52:34 PM  
One good thing about southeast Michigan, 0% wildfire risk, approx 0% earthquake zone.  Minimal flooding.  Yeah, we have a tornado once in awhile, but at least you know get some clue that they are coming.  And yes, we have Detroit, but not as dangerous as it used to be.
 
2022-05-16 12:55:42 PM  
I Don't Want To Set The World On Fire-The Ink Spots
Youtube 6l6vqPUM_FE
 
2022-05-16 1:05:00 PM  
Never had a wildfire get particularly close to my town.

But constant sirens because college students can't seem to stop setting themselves and their kitchens ablaze.
 
2022-05-16 1:06:23 PM  

pacified: Do urban centers have wildfires?


You'd think they don't, which is why the fire that swept through Santa Rosa CA in 2017 was so scary.
 
2022-05-16 1:09:13 PM  

SpectroBoy: Fairfield County, no increased risk!

Booyah!

/Will probably die in a blizzard related power outage


Or one of our occasional hurricanes.
 
2022-05-16 1:12:07 PM  
Central Ohio, zero chance of wildfire. As an added bonus, my basement just flooded this weekend, so even if a freak wildfire broke out, the flooding would kill it. #Winning?
 
2022-05-16 1:13:00 PM  
Huh, Mora county in NM is currently ashes under one of the worst fires in NM history with smoke generated clouds 35000ft into the air.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 1:13:31 PM  
More risk of flooding
 
2022-05-16 1:16:15 PM  
170% increase here.  Yay

A few miles from here, several years ago...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 1:16:54 PM  

vilesithknight: Central Ohio, zero chance of wildfire. As an added bonus, my basement just flooded this weekend, so even if a freak wildfire broke out, the flooding would kill it. #Winning?


That's one of the reasons I bought a house without a basement. Central Ohio is pretty insulated from most natural disasters, as it turns out, which was one of the reasons I moved here in 2006.
 
2022-05-16 1:25:03 PM  

gilatrout: Huh, Mora county in NM is currently ashes under one of the worst fires in NM history with smoke generated clouds 35000ft into the air.

[Fark user image 346x750]


That's why there's no risk.  Already burnt.
 
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