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(CBR)   So what inspired J.R.R. Tolkien to write The Lord of the Rings series?   (cbr.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien, Middle-earth, Tolkien's influences, Sauron, Lord of the Rings, World War I. Tolkien's recollections, epic poem Beowulf  
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1157 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 16 May 2022 at 8:35 AM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-16 8:44:34 AM  
No mention of The Inklings, article fails.
 
2022-05-16 8:51:52 AM  
I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?
 
2022-05-16 8:52:39 AM  
He wanted cosplay chicks?
 
2022-05-16 8:53:33 AM  
Drugs?
 
2022-05-16 8:54:10 AM  
Tolkien came from a Roman Catholic background and sprinkled many theological allegories

No. Tolkien despised allegory in all its forms and vehemently wrote against anyone interpreting his works as more than just mere fantasy. LOTR is not about WWII, it's not about Jesus Christ, it's not about King Arthur, it's not about any real or historical event. Some people, places, names, and things may have influenced his writings, but nothing is a direct translation or 1:1 relationship or metaphor.

They're just fairy stories -- vehicles for his made-up languages, to tell his kids at bedtime every night.
 
2022-05-16 8:55:37 AM  

Archie Goodwin: Drugs?


No, that was Lewis Carroll.
 
2022-05-16 8:58:17 AM  

snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?


You mean you don't want to spend hours agruing with internet nerds whether the mithril vest protected Frodo from the ring, which is never even remotely mentioned in the book and significantly diminishes the character for no reason?
 
2022-05-16 8:58:25 AM  
His racism and ardent passion for white nationalism? No wait, that's Harry Potter.
 
2022-05-16 9:01:21 AM  

Ishkur: Tolkien came from a Roman Catholic background and sprinkled many theological allegories

No. Tolkien despised allegory in all its forms and vehemently wrote against anyone interpreting his works as more than just mere fantasy. LOTR is not about WWII, it's not about Jesus Christ, it's not about King Arthur, it's not about any real or historical event. Some people, places, names, and things may have influenced his writings, but nothing is a direct translation or 1:1 relationship or metaphor.

They're just fairy stories -- vehicles for his made-up languages, to tell his kids at bedtime every night.


The only personal bias that shows up in LOTR is Tolkien's disdain for technology.
 
2022-05-16 9:01:49 AM  
Nerds.
 
2022-05-16 9:03:05 AM  

Great_Milenko: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

You mean you don't want to spend hours agruing with internet nerds whether the mithril vest protected Frodo from the ring, which is never even remotely mentioned in the book and significantly diminishes the character for no reason?


I think you over analyze my sentence and invoke an internet that did not exist in 1960. Nerds had also not been invented yet. Yet here we are.
 
2022-05-16 9:04:28 AM  
Any excuse to post this again:

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the it's my book they will walk if I tell them to
Youtube DgMnCLHQuqc
 
2022-05-16 9:24:45 AM  

Great_Milenko: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

You mean you don't want to spend hours agruing with internet nerds whether the mithril vest protected Frodo from the ring, which is never even remotely mentioned in the book and significantly diminishes the character for no reason?


I believe Sam made a reference to how the ring was heavier than armor (probably just a literary phrase) and someone (probably sam to frodo in Mordor) said touching it made it worse.

It isn't the hugest leap in logic to assume if you worse the necklace over something it protectcs you more than just finger farking it in your pocket like you have OCD.
 
2022-05-16 9:28:57 AM  

Ishkur: They're just fairy stories -- vehicles for his made-up languages, to tell his kids at bedtime every night.


This, so much this.  The stories were secondary to turning Finnish into Quenya.

And nagging from his publishers to produce a sequel to The Hobbit.
 
2022-05-16 9:31:05 AM  

snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?


There's nothing wrong with me.  Analysis doesn't destroy anything.

I enjoy things more when I understand where they came from.  What might just be a pleasant turn of phrase that's quickly forgotten changes into something else entirely when I understand that it's an allegorical reference to something else.

Now of course there are people that just do analysis for the sake of analysis (I'm looking at you, Derrida and your fellow post-modern deconstructionism whack-jobs).  But it's meaningful and enjoyable for me to see how any one piece of literature or music fits into the entire interrelated web of human creativity.
 
2022-05-16 9:44:57 AM  
He had an idea and wrote about it. There.
 
2022-05-16 10:05:04 AM  

Ishkur: Tolkien came from a Roman Catholic background and sprinkled many theological allegories

No. Tolkien despised allegory in all its forms and vehemently wrote against anyone interpreting his works as more than just mere fantasy. LOTR is not about WWII, it's not about Jesus Christ, it's not about King Arthur, it's not about any real or historical event. Some people, places, names, and things may have influenced his writings, but nothing is a direct translation or 1:1 relationship or metaphor.


Yeah, it's not allegories.  That's the wrong word.  Like Carl Jung, Tolkien understood the concept of archetypes and saw that there are repeating patterns in our stories.  To use one of his own examples, it's not that Frodo's destruction of the ring is an allegory of Christ's death & resurrection, but rather both the destruction of the ring and Christ's resurrection are both examples of what he called a "eucatastrophe."

There are certainly parallels between things like The Ring and the Atom Bomb, but it's because they share a similar trope.

/Also, the war of the Ents against Isengard wasn't an allegory of nature vs. technology, but rather a writer who was just unimpressed with Birnam Wood coming to Dunsinane.
 
2022-05-16 10:07:22 AM  

FrancoFile: No mention of The Inklings, article fails.


JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis realise something about dwarves
Youtube tEWSDcVzD7c
 
2022-05-16 10:50:26 AM  
He needed a sequel for The Hobbit. That's how we got Lord of the Rings. Its just that simple.
 
2022-05-16 11:11:01 AM  
media-amazon.comView Full Size


Because he liked dragons, DUH
 
2022-05-16 11:13:52 AM  
Like a lot of what happens in the world, He did it because he could.
 
2022-05-16 11:15:56 AM  
Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.
 
2022-05-16 11:24:32 AM  

stuhayes2010: Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.


There is a reason why he was cut from the movie.

/All it changed is that the Hobbits got their swords from a different place
 
2022-05-16 11:27:48 AM  

snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?


Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.
 
2022-05-16 11:29:41 AM  

Bondith: Ishkur: They're just fairy stories -- vehicles for his made-up languages, to tell his kids at bedtime every night.

This, so much this.  The stories were secondary to turning Finnish into Quenya.

And nagging from his publishers to produce a sequel to The Hobbit.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-16 11:31:32 AM  
I've heard from a pretty reliable source that his inspiration was "Ramble On" from Led Zeppelin II.
 
2022-05-16 11:31:34 AM  
I used to love a Podcast called The Tolkien Professor, who really showed a deep love for the material and a lot of interesting nuances that increased my love of the story
 
2022-05-16 11:34:53 AM  

Fano: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.


Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate it from a purely aesthetic or functional standpoint.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate the craftsmanship that went into producing it.

If you think literary analysis is the task of criticizing and finding fault with something, you had terrible teachers, or confuse Ebert for an academic.
 
2022-05-16 11:38:04 AM  

BeesNuts: Fano: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate it from a purely aesthetic or functional standpoint.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate the craftsmanship that went into producing it.

If you think literary analysis is the task of criticizing and finding fault with something, you had terrible teachers, or confuse Ebert for an academic.


Chopping up Anna Kournikova won't teach you much.
 
2022-05-16 11:40:55 AM  

Fano: BeesNuts: Fano: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate it from a purely aesthetic or functional standpoint.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate the craftsmanship that went into producing it.

If you think literary analysis is the task of criticizing and finding fault with something, you had terrible teachers, or confuse Ebert for an academic.

Chopping up Anna Kournikova won't teach you much.


Other than the difference between MDF and real hardwood.
 
2022-05-16 11:45:48 AM  
Tolkien denied any influence from Wagner but I always thought that was a little suspicious.  Dwarfs, humans, and gods fighting over a ring that grants incredible power but also curses the owner?  Come on.
 
2022-05-16 11:48:10 AM  

DerAppie: stuhayes2010: Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.

There is a reason why he was cut from the movie.

/All it changed is that the Hobbits got their swords from a different place


The movies left out one of the biggest parts of the conclusion that when they returned home, the Shire had been corrupted and the hobbits had to fight and retake it. Showing that you can't ignore a war at your border and pretend to not be effected by it. That was a huge theme of the book that the movies largely ignored along with the strong pro-environment message.
 
2022-05-16 11:51:13 AM  
Twilight fanfic?
 
2022-05-16 11:51:35 AM  

Xythero: Tolkien denied any influence from Wagner but I always thought that was a little suspicious.  Dwarfs, humans, and gods fighting over a ring that grants incredible power but also curses the owner?  Come on.


But that is all a do-over from The Silmarrilon. Elves and men fighting a God over the posseion of magic jewels. The oath to take them back cursing the oath takers.
 
2022-05-16 12:03:38 PM  

Fano: BeesNuts: Fano: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate it from a purely aesthetic or functional standpoint.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate the craftsmanship that went into producing it.

If you think literary analysis is the task of criticizing and finding fault with something, you had terrible teachers, or confuse Ebert for an academic.

Chopping up Anna Kournikova won't teach you much.


Why would murdering a Russian tennis player teach you anything?
 
2022-05-16 12:05:22 PM  

ModernPrimitive01: DerAppie: stuhayes2010: Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.

There is a reason why he was cut from the movie.

/All it changed is that the Hobbits got their swords from a different place

The movies left out one of the biggest parts of the conclusion that when they returned home, the Shire had been corrupted and the hobbits had to fight and retake it. Showing that you can't ignore a war at your border and pretend to not be effected by it. That was a huge theme of the book that the movies largely ignored along with the strong pro-environment message.


I know. But the movie was long enough already. I'm not going to complain about the stuff they cut that wasn't strongly related to the main quest.

The movies did a good job at bringing the meat of the book to the screen. If people want all the nitty gritty details, they shouldn't be watching an adaptation anyway.
 
2022-05-16 12:20:56 PM  

Great_Milenko: Ishkur: Tolkien came from a Roman Catholic background and sprinkled many theological allegories

No. Tolkien despised allegory in all its forms and vehemently wrote against anyone interpreting his works as more than just mere fantasy. LOTR is not about WWII, it's not about Jesus Christ, it's not about King Arthur, it's not about any real or historical event. Some people, places, names, and things may have influenced his writings, but nothing is a direct translation or 1:1 relationship or metaphor.

They're just fairy stories -- vehicles for his made-up languages, to tell his kids at bedtime every night.

The only personal bias that shows up in LOTR is Tolkien's disdain for technology.


Plus at least to Catholic bits: the evil of suicide and the permanence of marriage.  The marriage bit might be Guy Gavriel Kay's writing in the Silmarillion, with the exception of Arwen's price to marry Aragon.

There's no way J.R.R. Tolkien would have had Faramir take his unit out "Charge of the Light Brigade" style.

FrancoFile: No mention of The Inklings, article fails.


Who is this CBR.com and why are they publishing things with zero research?  And to be honest, Tolkien was probably significantly more motivated by his earlier medievalist friends: the ones that didn't make it through the Great War (so he was the only one left to write the Great Medieval Novel).
 
2022-05-16 12:36:36 PM  

Fano: BeesNuts: Fano: snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?

Supposedly they claim it's enjoyable.
I don't know how to find joy in endlessly criticizing and finding fault in a thing I love, though.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate it from a purely aesthetic or functional standpoint.

Some people like to look at a nice piece of furniture and appreciate the craftsmanship that went into producing it.

If you think literary analysis is the task of criticizing and finding fault with something, you had terrible teachers, or confuse Ebert for an academic.

Chopping up Anna Kournikova won't teach you much.


You only dismiss the skills involved until you have to get rid of a body, then suddenly you regret not getting in some practice when you weren't the subject of a police investigation.
 
2022-05-16 12:39:21 PM  
His attempts to find your grandmother's G-spot.

/sorry
 
2022-05-16 12:57:46 PM  
I think she was on a train and she had the idea "boy goes to wizard school without knowing he's a wizard" and it went from there
 
2022-05-16 1:04:35 PM  
tolkiens stated goal after LOTR was to revise the timeline to make everything internally coherent and consistent

the frame story that LOTR and other works are translations of ancient books left by the hobbits is more than just a literary device.

it provided a framework for tolkien to imagine his own scattered notes, fragments, and ideas over the decades as discovered primary sources and his job as a historian was to synthesize an internally sound historical narrative from these wild ranging and often contradictory materials   that would cover Arda's history all the way from its creation from the music of the Ainur to its destruction in the Dagor Dagorath

he died before he finished but in many ways the work of Christopher Tolkien and his successors has been to maintain this historical conceit while organizing and publishing the mountains of aforementioned notes and fragments JRR left us
 
2022-05-16 2:07:05 PM  
Tolkien explains why the Fellowship didn't fly the Eagles to Mordor
Youtube 1-Uz0LMbWpI
 
2022-05-16 3:44:36 PM  

DerAppie: I know. But the movie was long enough already. I'm not going to complain about the stuff they cut that wasn't strongly related to the main quest.


They could have cut out the like 30 endings and had enough time for the scouring.
 
2022-05-16 3:54:33 PM  

trialpha: DerAppie: I know. But the movie was long enough already. I'm not going to complain about the stuff they cut that wasn't strongly related to the main quest.

They could have cut out the like 30 endings and had enough time for the scouring.


What? And miss the slow-mo hobbit pajama party?
 
2022-05-16 4:07:49 PM  
1.) He wanted a story to go behind the languages he invented.

2.) he mourned the loss of a true English mythology due to many conquerings of the isles by the Romans, the Vikings, and more

3.) he fought in world war 1. In the trenches. And all his friends died.

Dnrtfa - we'll never know for sure unless he said.
 
2022-05-16 4:17:19 PM  
FYFA (emphasis added):  . . . Tolkien's influences span across both mythology and Christianity . . .

Heh.
 
2022-05-16 6:03:07 PM  

Moriel: What inspired Tolkien to write the Lord of the Rings?  Why it was something not mentioned at all in the article.  Namely that Rayner Unwin, his publisher, came to him and asked for a sequel to The Hobbit.  Seriously.


And then had to wait 16 years or so for him to finish it.
 
2022-05-16 6:18:07 PM  

stuhayes2010: Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.


Same here. The Hobbit is a story. LORT is goddamned homework. The only way I got through that terrible trilogy was by skipping every song, every poem, every family tree, everything in italics.

The movies are gawdawful too. Didn't even make it ten minutes into the first one when Mrs Clam and I looked at each other and we're like "Yeah, we're out."
 
2022-05-16 6:36:43 PM  

Fear the Clam: stuhayes2010: Loved The Hobbit, have started Fellowship about 20 times.  Too many words and songs, Did he really think it was enjoyable to read song stanzas?  I've attempted the audiobook of Fellowship and couldn't finish it.   Oh, a giant chapter dedicated to Tom Bobadil?  He's not effected by the ring at all?  What's he do with the rest of the story?  Nothing.

Same here. The Hobbit is a story. LORT is goddamned homework. The only way I got through that terrible trilogy was by skipping every song, every poem, every family tree, everything in italics.


I'm a huge fan of the books, but yeah, Fellowship is a slog, especially the first half.  Every time he gets a bit of plot going, someone stops for a meal or a song or fifty years go by.
 
2022-05-16 7:34:01 PM  

snocone: I truly love reading. As a student, however, this sort of puzzling over a wonderful novel and dissecting it absolutely ruined the experience for me. I refused to participate in classrooms and maybe started early development of a massive passive aggressive attitude that has served me well in life by farking with teacher when cornered in class.

Why not just read it and enjoy it?
What is wrong with you people that must destroy what you should just enjoy?


Maybe the problem is you and your assumption that analysis is destructive.

Also, being a dick in a classroom doesn't make you the good guy.
 
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