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(YouTube)   How to recreate the world's best carbonara   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Giggity  
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439 clicks; posted to Food » on 14 May 2022 at 9:14 PM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-05-14 6:27:43 PM  
does it involve neither guanciale nor pancetta? I bet it involves neither guanciale nor pancetta.
 
2022-05-14 6:42:14 PM  
Needs garlic
 
2022-05-14 7:02:00 PM  
Seems like a lot of work... I'll stick with this, thank you:

gimmethegoodstuff.orgView Full Size
 
2022-05-14 7:10:15 PM  
It had better have peas- carbonara must have peas.

Remember the shouting from last time?
 
2022-05-14 7:24:05 PM  

maxandgrinch: It had better have peas- carbonara must have peas.

Remember the shouting from last time?


oh, pease as if there weren't shouting from ever' damn time ;-)
 
2022-05-14 7:29:15 PM  

tintar: does it involve neither guanciale nor pancetta? I bet it involves neither guanciale nor pancetta.


You would lose that bet, it does involve guanciale and much more.

/The sauce is essentially hollandaise without the lemon, or pork fat mayonnaise
 
2022-05-14 8:00:33 PM  

RaceDTruck: tintar: does it involve neither guanciale nor pancetta? I bet it involves neither guanciale nor pancetta.

You would lose that bet, it does involve guanciale and much more.

/The sauce is essentially hollandaise without the lemon, or pork fat mayonnaise


I... [rick castle dot jif] ...I'm sorry, are you from the past?
 
2022-05-14 9:22:07 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-05-14 9:34:33 PM  
s2.tryandreview.comView Full Size

/I'll see myself out
//aaaaand reported.
 
2022-05-14 11:04:59 PM  
It's a tribute.
 
2022-05-14 11:23:31 PM  
I make this once a week. There is no mystery. Use only Italian guanciale, use bucatini pasta, one egg plus one yolk per person. Lots of fresh ground pepper, a combo of Parmesan reggiano plus pecorino Romano. Lots of cheese. Cube and stir fry the guanciale, then throw in the cooked pasta, stir off heat. Whisk in the egg and cheese mixture with a bit of the pasta water. And there you have it. Garnish with ground pepper and cheese. Prepare to become addicted..
 
2022-05-14 11:35:01 PM  

aaronx: It's a tribute.


i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-05-15 12:11:51 AM  
Many thanks, Subby.  Carbonara is something I've never really done well.  It's so good, though, when I've had it at certain places.
 
2022-05-15 6:43:25 AM  

tintar: maxandgrinch: It had better have peas- carbonara must have peas.

Remember the shouting from last time?

oh, pease as if there weren't shouting from ever' damn time ;-)


I've seen a handwaving yelling fight over this between two people, and listening to it from a distance it was pretty immediately clear that the problem was just, "People from this side of the country did it like this, and people over here did it slightly differently."  But oh no - one had to be right and one had to be wrong.  They eventually both got hit by a blast from the garden hose from BOTH of their signficant others - which garnered said SO's a round of applause.

/besides, they were both wrong - you REALLY make it by....
//runs before y'all can get to the hose
///food arguments are farking stupid beyond, "Hmm - this combination is kinda untasty imo, maybe you need to look at the spicing or something?"
////and, "I like it this way, so do others I cook for." is an entirely valid answer - at that point I'll shrug and say fair enough (although I shan't be having any myself)
 
2022-05-15 7:16:06 AM  

dodecahedron: I make this once a week. There is no mystery. Use only Italian guanciale, use bucatini pasta, one egg plus one yolk per person. Lots of fresh ground pepper, a combo of Parmesan reggiano plus pecorino Romano. Lots of cheese. Cube and stir fry the guanciale, then throw in the cooked pasta, stir off heat. Whisk in the egg and cheese mixture with a bit of the pasta water. And there you have it. Garnish with ground pepper and cheese. Prepare to become addicted..


It's easier if you put the pasta into the egg mixture, but otherwise that's pretty much it.

Carbonara is supposed to be a simple dish with a working class history. Once you start turning it into some fancy nonsense, you've lost the spirit of it, and you really can't call it carbonara anymore.
 
2022-05-15 7:57:31 AM  

The Madd Mann: dodecahedron: I make this once a week. There is no mystery. Use only Italian guanciale, use bucatini pasta, one egg plus one yolk per person. Lots of fresh ground pepper, a combo of Parmesan reggiano plus pecorino Romano. Lots of cheese. Cube and stir fry the guanciale, then throw in the cooked pasta, stir off heat. Whisk in the egg and cheese mixture with a bit of the pasta water. And there you have it. Garnish with ground pepper and cheese. Prepare to become addicted..

It's easier if you put the pasta into the egg mixture, but otherwise that's pretty much it.

Carbonara is supposed to be a simple dish with a working class history. Once you start turning it into some fancy nonsense, you've lost the spirit of it, and you really can't call it carbonara anymore.


True, but with Italian guanciale at $30 per pound it's no longer much of a peasant dish, and that really is the best thing to use. Bacon or pancetta are ok to sub in a pinch but guanciale is amazing. I buy it online 2 lbs. at a time.

I wouldn't add the pasta to the egg and cheese. There's flavor benefits in swirling it in the off heat guanciale pan (it absorbs some of the yummy fat) and letting it cool a bit before whisking in the sauce. Once you know how to do it, it's simple.
 
2022-05-15 8:52:38 AM  
The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.
 
2022-05-15 9:06:16 AM  

deadsanta: The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.


I think we all experience the scrambled egg...once. Until we learn how to do it right. The key is not to put sauce into too hot oil and pasta. Cook the guanciale first, then turn off the heat under it, and let the pan cool down for a couple of minutes before adding in the al dente pasta, stir for about a minute. Then add the sauce quickly , stir it fast, and amend with a bit of pasta water to make it creamy.

I think there are other YouTube videos about making carbonara that are better than the linked one. Kenji Lopez Alt has a good one. Chef Jean Pierre has a good one. There are others.
 
2022-05-15 9:12:59 AM  

dodecahedron: deadsanta: The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.

I think we all experience the scrambled egg...once. Until we learn how to do it right. The key is not to put sauce into too hot oil and pasta. Cook the guanciale first, then turn off the heat under it, and let the pan cool down for a couple of minutes before adding in the al dente pasta, stir for about a minute. Then add the sauce quickly , stir it fast, and amend with a bit of pasta water to make it creamy.

I think there are other YouTube videos about making carbonara that are better than the linked one. Kenji Lopez Alt has a good one. Chef Jean Pierre has a good one. There are others.


would it make any sense to temper some fat into the sauce first?
 
2022-05-15 9:33:05 AM  

tintar: dodecahedron: deadsanta: The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.

I think we all experience the scrambled egg...once. Until we learn how to do it right. The key is not to put sauce into too hot oil and pasta. Cook the guanciale first, then turn off the heat under it, and let the pan cool down for a couple of minutes before adding in the al dente pasta, stir for about a minute. Then add the sauce quickly , stir it fast, and amend with a bit of pasta water to make it creamy.

I think there are other YouTube videos about making carbonara that are better than the linked one. Kenji Lopez Alt has a good one. Chef Jean Pierre has a good one. There are others.

would it make any sense to temper some fat into the sauce first?


I can't imagine why you'd need to If you do it the classic way.
 
2022-05-15 9:37:44 AM  
Saju Bistro

You can wait, but you will thank me. Best Carbonara in the World.
 
2022-05-15 9:39:49 AM  

dodecahedron: deadsanta: The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.

I think we all experience the scrambled egg...once. Until we learn how to do it right. The key is not to put sauce into too hot oil and pasta. Cook the guanciale first, then turn off the heat under it, and let the pan cool down for a couple of minutes before adding in the al dente pasta, stir for about a minute. Then add the sauce quickly , stir it fast, and amend with a bit of pasta water to make it creamy.

I think there are other YouTube videos about making carbonara that are better than the linked one. Kenji Lopez Alt has a good one. Chef Jean Pierre has a good one. There are others.


Are there bad Jean-Pierre videos?

/I'd say the same about Kenji but I haven't seen many of those
//mainly he just gets referenced by all the other people cooking (in my experience)
///so I'd imagine probably not a lot of duds there either
 
2022-05-15 12:10:53 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: dodecahedron: deadsanta: The most important part of this dish is timing: Mix the sauce into the hot fat and watered pasta too soon and the eggs will set up and you'll have scrambled egg pasta instead of a silky carbonara sauce.  This explainer is totally worth watching because it has a couple cool techniques that reduce the chance you wind up with clotted egg noodles, good stuff here.

I think we all experience the scrambled egg...once. Until we learn how to do it right. The key is not to put sauce into too hot oil and pasta. Cook the guanciale first, then turn off the heat under it, and let the pan cool down for a couple of minutes before adding in the al dente pasta, stir for about a minute. Then add the sauce quickly , stir it fast, and amend with a bit of pasta water to make it creamy.

I think there are other YouTube videos about making carbonara that are better than the linked one. Kenji Lopez Alt has a good one. Chef Jean Pierre has a good one. There are others.

Are there bad Jean-Pierre videos?

/I'd say the same about Kenji but I haven't seen many of those
//mainly he just gets referenced by all the other people cooking (in my experience)
///so I'd imagine probably not a lot of duds there either


I love both of these guys. I've been into making pan sauces lately, and Jean Pierre is the bomb for that. I think he's one of the best cooking instructors on YouTube. Kenji is amazing also and he's a sous vide expert, too. I used to like Chef John but he seems to me to be phoning it in lately. He doesn't like to cook anything complex or exotic, and that's OK for some things. I just like to learn new techniques now and understand why and how ingredients work together, and so I'm now gravitating to JP and Kenji much of the time, along with some other Asian and Italian chefs/cooks.
 
2022-05-16 1:28:09 AM  

tintar: maxandgrinch: It had better have peas- carbonara must have peas.

Remember the shouting from last time?

oh, pease as if there weren't shouting from ever' damn time ;-)


Hey come on Tin. Give peas a chance.
 
2022-05-16 2:04:17 AM  

NINEv2: tintar: maxandgrinch: It had better have peas- carbonara must have peas.

Remember the shouting from last time?

oh, pease as if there weren't shouting from ever' damn time ;-)

Hey come on Tin. Give peas a chance.


Everybody's talkin' bout pan reduction, heat conduction, cheese construction, pepper function, proper portion, pasta ruction!
This addition, that restriction, this one this one this one!
All we are sayyyyyyyyyyyin'
Is give peas a channnnce
 
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