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(The Conversation)   Water expert explains what a dead pool is. Wade Wilson unavailable for comment   (theconversation.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Colorado River, Lake Powell, reservoir drops, dead pool, Lake Mead, media reports, acre-feet of water, level of water  
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1237 clicks; posted to STEM » on 12 May 2022 at 5:38 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-12 3:06:31 PM  
Before all the Deadpool memes hit, I'd like to remind everyone that COLO data centers drink down water like there's no tomorrow, and rely on cheap hydroelectric power to operate.
Once the water is gone, the cost of data will increase rapidly.
 
2022-05-12 5:04:49 PM  

Weaver95: Before all the Deadpool memes hit, I'd like to remind everyone that COLO data centers drink down water like there's no tomorrow, and rely on cheap hydroelectric power to operate.
Once the water is gone, the cost of data will increase rapidly.


I
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your post.
 
2022-05-12 5:54:35 PM  
nitpicky, but is there a reason the author is referring to the Hoover Dam as the Boulder Canyon Dam?
 
2022-05-12 6:59:32 PM  

Weaver95: data centers drink down water


Where does the water go? Do they genuinely use river water for "once through" cooling and then discharge it somewhere?
 
2022-05-12 8:33:13 PM  

Weaver95: Before all the Deadpool memes hit, I'd like to remind everyone that COLO data centers drink down water like there's no tomorrow, and rely on cheap hydroelectric power to operate.
Once the water is gone, the cost of data will increase rapidly.


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2022-05-12 9:06:53 PM  

Weaver95: Before all the Deadpool memes hit, I'd like to remind everyone that COLO data centers drink down water like there's no tomorrow, and rely on cheap hydroelectric power to operate.
Once the water is gone, the cost of data will increase rapidly.


Don't worry building more chip factories in the desert will help.
 
2022-05-12 9:22:51 PM  

mrmopar5287: Weaver95: data centers drink down water

Where does the water go? Do they genuinely use river water for "once through" cooling and then discharge it somewhere?


Cooling towers have a high evaporation rate , unless things have changed. Think giant outside swamp coolers. It would make more sense if they were submerged in say , a cold saline body of water.
 
2022-05-12 9:27:20 PM  

alienated: mrmopar5287: Weaver95: data centers drink down water

Where does the water go? Do they genuinely use river water for "once through" cooling and then discharge it somewhere?

Cooling towers have a high evaporation rate , unless things have changed. Think giant outside swamp coolers. It would make more sense if they were submerged in say , a cold saline body of water.


Which , and I know it's not proper form to quote oneself , could be created using the outflow brine afterproduct of a very large desalination plant. Of course that would require a large nuclear plant , solar farms and a giant battery system , along with a pumping and pipeline network. Too bad there just is not a single place to build those. It's a shame , really. If only there were those " exceptional Americans I keep hearing about. If. Only.
 
2022-05-12 9:41:18 PM  

alienated: Cooling towers have a high evaporation rate , unless things have changed. Think giant outside swamp coolers. It would make more sense if they were submerged in say , a cold saline body of water.


In a sane world we would have data centers located near water processing plants so that the water cleaned for distribution could be used to cool the heat load and then put into the distribution pipeline. The heat would be dissipated underground and there could be minimal or zero water loss. We should be looking into "cogeneration" use of resources like that.

Arizona has the largest nuclear power plant in the USA: The Palo Verde plant with three reactors. That plant uses treated sewage water from nearby towns for cooling. It's using water that's already been used to cool the plant.
 
2022-05-12 9:43:34 PM  
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2022-05-12 10:03:20 PM  
I think I'll buy some ammo.  People tend to get feisty when the power's been out for days and the taps stopped running.
 
2022-05-12 10:10:28 PM  
"The ICE is gonna BREAK!"


/oh wait, sorry. My bad.
 
2022-05-12 10:11:39 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size


Such an interesting movie.  It had Liam Neeson, Jim Carry and most of Guns N Roses including Slash firing a harpoon gun.
 
2022-05-12 10:18:39 PM  

alienated: Cooling towers have a high evaporation rate , unless things have changed. Think giant outside swamp coolers. It would make more sense if they were submerged in say , a cold saline body of water.


No, the cooling is not a result of the water temp simply being transferred from one body to the next, but the fact that the process of water evaporation causes a marked decrease in temperature through the negative heat transfer required to change water from a liquid to a vapor.  You need the evaporation to happen in order to make this work.

On an interesting side note, Las Vegas has recently enacted a measure that limits evaporative cooling installations.
 
2022-05-12 10:28:07 PM  

dennysgod: [i.pinimg.com image 300x240]

Such an interesting movie.  It had Liam Neeson, Jim Carry and most of Guns N Roses including Slash firing a harpoon gun.


And a damn fine Patricia Clarkson.
 
2022-05-12 10:37:27 PM  

mrmopar5287: In a sane world we would have data centers located near water processing plants so that the water cleaned for distribution could be used to cool the heat load and then put into the distribution pipeline.


Problem with that is this water is much more expensive than just raw water taken out of a river.  Also, most cooling systems use evaporative cooling which concentrates all the minerals and makes it unsuitable for potable water use.  Also see Legionnaire's disease.  You don't want that getting into the water system.
 
2022-05-12 10:55:48 PM  

HeadLever: most cooling systems use evaporative cooling


You do that when it's prohibitively expensive or impossible to cool with a larger volume of water that doesn't use evaporative cooling. If you pair your data center with a large enough water processing plant, the volume of water used for cooling is enough to where it doesn't have to evaporate to do the job.
 
2022-05-12 11:18:34 PM  

mrmopar5287: You do that when it's prohibitively expensive or impossible to cool with a larger volume of water that doesn't use evaporative cooling


Which is most of the western US.  In addition, the main component to making evaporative cooling work is low humidity.  That is why you see swamp coolers in the west, but rarely east of the Mississippi.  However, you see more water there so simple heat transfer (both through water and geothermal) is a better option.
 
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