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(Fast Company)   Science proves what all moms already know. That around the age of 13, children no longer find their mothers' voices "uniquely rewarding"   (fastcompany.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Brain, Adolescence, new study, Magnetic resonance imaging, part of their brain, Brain tumor, mothers' voices, earlier study  
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568 clicks; posted to STEM » on 08 May 2022 at 6:20 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-05-08 2:49:10 PM  
And then it becomes so again around 19 or 20 after life starts kicking your ass.
 
2022-05-08 5:28:06 PM  

fatassbastard: And then it becomes so again around 19 or 20 after life starts kicking your ass.


Or earlier, if the kid needs $$$.

Simply amazing how much my kids suddenly love me, when their funds are running out.
 
2022-05-08 6:31:14 PM  
Well, yeah, but my mother was terrified when I started having my own thoughts and opinions about things. She was upset the first time she saw me reading a newspaper at the tender age of 11, perhaps 10. So maybe that's a thing?

/ yes, an actual newspaper
// because I am old
/// behold my lawn, but don't get on it
 
2022-05-08 8:03:58 PM  
Let's try another summary of the research
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-04-brain-scans-teens-nonfamilial-voices.html
The new work involved making audio recordings of volunteer mothers saying nonsense words. The researchers then played the recordings for the teenage offspring of the mothers during fMRI scans, which highlighted the parts of the brain that were activating. The researchers also played other random sounds and the voices of people that were not known to the volunteers.
They found that the teens still accurately recognized the voices of their mothers, but when they reached a certain age, generally around 13 to 14, their brains began responding less excitedly to recordings of their mothers' voices and more so when hearing the voices of other people. Eventually, they responded more to unknown voices than to their mother's voice. More specifically, they found that the voice-selective superior temporal sulcus became more active in the teens as they grew older when hearing almost any voice.


That doesn't sound ecologically valid. Would you be more responsive to your mother or a potentially dangerous stranger saying nonsense words?

From TFA
> Daniel Abrams, the lead author and an associate professor at Stanford, said in a statement. "As a teen, you don't know you're doing this. You're just being you: You've got your friends and new companions, and you want to spend time with them."

No Mr. Abrams, while you want your research to be misinterpreted and go viral it doesn't say teens start responding more to friends than parents. You didn't test the voices of any known people other than mothers.

The research says that teens become more aroused by strangers than known people.
 
2022-05-08 9:20:24 PM  

HairBolus: That doesn't sound ecologically valid. Would you be more responsive to your mother or a potentially dangerous stranger saying nonsense words?


Dunno wtf "ecologically valid" is, but time to cut those apron strings ma'am.
 
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