Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Deslidefied)   Here are some bizarre foods your grandparents ate. Oh, and the first one is known as S.O.S. and subby still eats it occasionally   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line
    More: Interesting, number of slides, Slide guitar, Kristen Wiig, Main page, Lens, site, slides, image URLs  
•       •       •

1614 clicks; posted to Food » on 30 Apr 2022 at 7:15 AM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



88 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2022-04-30 2:53:30 AM  
ambrosia was pretty popular at Ohio gatherings. I'd never give it a second glance now, but back then I didn't hate it?

and cheese ball? c'mon!!! it is one of the most classic delicious things. $mai_waifu and I to this day still occasionally pick up one of those port wine cheese dealies, with the crushed walnuts and all.

oh! another popular/usual thing was a sort of fruit+jello ~cheesecake graham cracker crust type thing. now that, I could still see eating.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-30 3:59:36 AM  
I used to enjoy creamed chipped beef on toast.
Unfortunately "S.O.S." stands for "Shiatload Of Sodium".
 
2022-04-30 6:30:34 AM  
From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.

3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)
 
2022-04-30 6:57:03 AM  
Ambrosia is a staple in the south(I haven't had any since I was old enough to spit)
 
2022-04-30 7:21:58 AM  

Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.

3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)


The quickest way to find this "salad" is by inspecting any nearby rubbish bin.

Same for "ambrosia" salad. It is inedible.
 
2022-04-30 7:34:31 AM  
I'm from the Midwest.  I've been eating cheeseballs since 1968.
 
2022-04-30 7:38:53 AM  
Oh look, this thread again.
 
2022-04-30 7:44:30 AM  
It's not called A, it's called B. And the recipe is totally different.
 
2022-04-30 7:49:05 AM  

frogmyte: Oh look, this thread again.


assjuice: It's not called A, it's called B. And the recipe is totally different.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-30 7:50:02 AM  

Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.

3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)


No, grape salad is not Waldorf salad.  It's just grapes with a mix of cream cheese and sour cream ( and usually a little vanilla). Typically topped with a mix of chopped pecans and brown sugar. I see it a lot around here, and make it now and then.
 
2022-04-30 7:52:56 AM  

Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.

3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)


May be with white people.

And stew isn't bizarre.
 
2022-04-30 8:19:05 AM  
Sausage gravy is a cheap stretcher, and I guess if you're using canned goods a fatty canned meat would work as the start. Pan fry until rendered, add a spoon of flour to make rue, then add cream or milk to make a gravy. Add pepper, spread over toast or biscuits.
 
2022-04-30 8:27:25 AM  
Around here SOS was ground beef and onions in a white sauce on toast. Creamed chipped beef on toast was called creamed chipped beef on toast.

Not a fan of either but when Mom made her creamed onions . . . oh my! Pearl onions in a bechamel sauce.

I grew up eating 5 of those, and still love the occasional cheese ball or 7-layer salad.
 
2022-04-30 8:32:08 AM  

Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places


No it isn't. Waldorf Salad has apples in it.
 
2022-04-30 8:44:07 AM  
Had a place in my hometown that had SOS on the menu. It was perfect 2am drunk food after a college party. There version was browned ground beef and caramelized onions on toast points with American cheese and white country style gravy. I still make it at the house from time to time.
 
2022-04-30 8:59:16 AM  
for the blue cheese fans among us, try auntie carol's cheeseball. make a day ahead for best flavor. cheeses at room temp.

8 oz cream cheese.
8 oz blue cheese.( i used stilton from trader joes)
1/4 cup finely minced white onion.
1/4 cup sweetened shredded coconut plus 1/4 cup for later.
1/4 cup finely minced parsley (optional)
1 tsp worcestershire.
1/4 cup crushed pecans plus 1/4 cup for later.
using an electric mixer , mix all ingredients together, form into 1 large or 2 small rough balls. refrigerate overnight. next day round out balls and cover with saran. before serving roll in reserved coconut and pecan. serve with a cheese knife and crackers. someone will eat the whole thing every time...
using an el
 
2022-04-30 9:06:05 AM  
Poor man's stew?  That's what I cook in my crock pot, regardless of actual contents.
 
2022-04-30 9:09:21 AM  
Poor man's stew don't seem weird, but if you think so, you better copy that recipe, because you might be eating it soon.
 
2022-04-30 9:12:32 AM  
Lime Jell-O Marshmallow Cottage Cheese Surprise
Youtube 7tWuG2oPL3o
 
2022-04-30 9:17:03 AM  
Uhm, it was called Mock Apple Pie, not Faux Apple Pie.  I doubt the people who made it ever encountered the word 'faux'.

/never had it, but we always had Ritz crackers in the house
 
2022-04-30 9:20:48 AM  

Cortez the Killer: Had a place in my hometown that had SOS on the menu. It was perfect 2am drunk food after a college party. There version was browned ground beef and caramelized onions on toast points with American cheese and white country style gravy. I still make it at the house from time to time.


Like the place I used to go that served a cheeseburger, but their version was a hotdog with chili on it.

chipped beef =/= ground beef
 
2022-04-30 9:24:34 AM  

catmandu: Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

No it isn't. Waldorf Salad has apples in it.


Did you stop reading at #1?

Let me refresh your memory:

Winterlight: 2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.


Oh yeah, look right there. And to further refresh your memory:

Winterlight: 3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)


Note the bold text: we don't have "grape salad" with Cool Whip down here. Cool Whip is for pumpkin pie during Thanksgiving, as every good Southerner knows. You bring "grape salad" to the church picnic, you'll forever be branded a Yankee and be shunned by the good folks in town.
 
2022-04-30 9:31:25 AM  
My mom was into recipes from  various women's magazines.  All of this sponsored trash foods like jello salads, and crap like the article.

I'm glad she's dead.
 
2022-04-30 9:32:02 AM  
Most of those aren't that weird. I mean, the kid-century fascination with gelatin and other processed foods is a little gross, but it's understandable. I was expecting a truly weird list of things they are in the first half of the twentieth century. Like, my grandma ate squirrels. Including their brains. The original Joy of Cooking has a section on animals nobody today would even consider eating, like raccoons.
 
2022-04-30 9:32:18 AM  

phlegmjay: Most of those aren't that weird. I mean, the kid-century fascination with gelatin and other processed foods is a little gross, but it's understandable. I was expecting a truly weird list of things they are in the first half of the twentieth century. Like, my grandma ate squirrels. Including their brains. The original Joy of Cooking has a section on animals nobody today would even consider eating, like raccoons.


Mid century.
 
2022-04-30 9:34:31 AM  

tintar: ambrosia was pretty popular at Ohio gatherings. I'd never give it a second glance now, but back then I didn't hate it?

and cheese ball? c'mon!!! it is one of the most classic delicious things. $mai_waifu and I to this day still occasionally pick up one of those port wine cheese dealies, with the crushed walnuts and all.

oh! another popular/usual thing was a sort of fruit+jello ~cheesecake graham cracker crust type thing. now that, I could still see eating.

[Fark user image image 850x584]


I make a similar dessert with cream cheese and cranberry jelly. Blended, not layered, and with a crust of crushed mint hydrox. It disappears whenever I make it.
 
2022-04-30 9:42:54 AM  

bearded clamorer: I used to enjoy creamed chipped beef on toast.
Unfortunately "S.O.S." stands for "Shiatload Of Sodium".


But like sausage gravy it is still a nice comfort food treat once in a while.
 
2022-04-30 9:45:00 AM  
Did you know the original Crock-Pot has been around since 1940?

JFC will someone get these wide-eyed unemployable English majors real work before they try to rename heat and introduce it to the world on TikTok?
 
2022-04-30 9:54:31 AM  
For those interested: The Gallery of Regrettable Foods

Come for the Gel-cooking, stay for the 12 Wonderful Starch Plates.
 
2022-04-30 9:55:57 AM  
also back in the day -- before you were born -- your parents performed oral sex -- and not necessarily on each other
 
2022-04-30 9:57:30 AM  

Winterlight: catmandu: Winterlight: From TFA: Creamy Grape Salad - This vintage grape salad is extremely simple to make and will steal the spotlight at any potluck. Using cream cheese, sour cream, and cool whip for the dressing guarantees a mouthwatering rich dish

1) It's called "Waldorf Salad" most places

No it isn't. Waldorf Salad has apples in it.

Did you stop reading at #1?

Let me refresh your memory:

Winterlight: 2) it's just grapes, celery, apples, and walnuts mixed with mayo. No cream cheese, no sour cream, and get that Cool Whip away from my kitchen you ignorant savage.

Oh yeah, look right there. And to further refresh your memory:

Winterlight: 3) Is still very common at potlucks and church picnics (at least here in the South)

Note the bold text: we don't have "grape salad" with Cool Whip down here. Cool Whip is for pumpkin pie during Thanksgiving, as every good Southerner knows. You bring "grape salad" to the church picnic, you'll forever be branded a Yankee and be shunned by the good folks in town.


I take it you didn't actually read the recipe. You quoted TFA, then mentioned that what was described in TFA is called Waldorf Salad. It is not. Since I actually read things, here is the recipe from TFA:

INGREDIENTS
4 oz cream cheese softened
1 cup sour cream
3 Tablespoons sugar
2 Tablespoons pure vanilla extract
2 pounds seedless red grapes
2 pounds seedless green grapes
2 cups cool whip
Brown sugar to garnish optional
Pecans

No apples mentioned anywhere.
 
2022-04-30 10:03:27 AM  

slobberbone: Did you know the original Crock-Pot has been around since 1940?

JFC will someone get these wide-eyed unemployable English majors real work before they try to rename heat and introduce it to the world on TikTok?


Did you know that English majors actually do pretty well on the job market? They're pretty reliably middle of the pack in terms of mid-career salaries, making as much as biology majors, and that's despite the fact that teachers drag down the average salary of English degrees and Doctors raise the average of biology degrees.

Of course, if we only care about money, then engineering degrees are where it's at, but the stereotype of unemployable English (or History or Philosophy) majors is a myth.
 
2022-04-30 10:12:58 AM  

phlegmjay: phlegmjay: Most of those aren't that weird. I mean, the kid-century fascination with gelatin and other processed foods is a little gross, but it's understandable. I was expecting a truly weird list of things they are in the first half of the twentieth century. Like, my grandma ate squirrels. Including their brains. The original Joy of Cooking has a section on animals nobody today would even consider eating, like raccoons.

Mid century.


I liked the first version better!

in today's war thread, someone used the word "nutpicking" - turns out it was actually not an amusing typo for nitpicking, but in fact a real thing :( https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Nutpicking
 
2022-04-30 10:16:26 AM  

phlegmjay: Did you know that English majors actually do pretty well on the job market?


This is great news. They can quit having to take shiat assignments like this then.
 
2022-04-30 10:32:33 AM  
Salad - SNL
Youtube Mf-bsT5mLYs
 
2022-04-30 10:33:52 AM  
SOS was a staple for my late dad. He used to eat it from his helmet during WWII.
Every time he made it, we'd hear that story.
 
2022-04-30 10:49:46 AM  
My grandad liked to have SOS every now and then. He was a WWII vet and he still had a soft spot for it. I like it and still have it every now and then. My daughter even likes it and asks for it occasionally for lunch on the weekends.

/Papa would be proud
 
2022-04-30 10:51:34 AM  

cookiedough: SOS was a staple for my late dad. He used to eat it from his helmet during WWII.
Every time he made it, we'd hear that story.


My Dad used to say his father made the best SOS. He learned how as a mess cook for an Army hospital in France in WW1 and it was originally cut up roast beef in cream sauce and a dish already common in France. My grandfather ended up opening a restaurant when he came home.
 
2022-04-30 10:53:41 AM  
Weird things my grandparents ate include kishka, schmaltz, petcha, and poached carp. Mom made them from time to time, but gradually standard blah American cuisine took over. As a little kid the petcha, calf's foot jelly, was a favorite. This was before I learned that there were right and wrong foods with sharp distinctions that Fark was created to enforce.
 
2022-04-30 11:12:01 AM  

phlegmjay: Most of those aren't that weird. I mean, the kid-century fascination with gelatin and other processed foods is a little gross, but it's understandable. I was expecting a truly weird list of things they are in the first half of the twentieth century. Like, my grandma ate squirrels. Including their brains. The original Joy of Cooking has a section on animals nobody today would even consider eating, like raccoons.


Stubby must be on the young side, I've probably eaten more than half of those. This first to disappear from the family menu was SOS.  This thread reminded me about the "SOS Dichotomy":  the two different versions, the correct version with chipped beef, and the upstart, with...ground beef.  I just discover more background on that:
https://www.cooksinfo.com/shiat-on-a-shingle

For foods that my grandparents ate, that would cover a huge range, depending on which grandparents.  My dad's family had a huge house and household staff.  They ate very differently than my mom's family, who lived in a worn-out farmhouse without electricity or "indoor and led a very hardscrabble life.
 
2022-04-30 11:12:12 AM  

bearded clamorer: I used to enjoy creamed chipped beef on toast.
Unfortunately "S.O.S." stands for "Shiatload Of Sodium".


Never had SOS as a kid, but my uncle (who grew up in Houston) made made some damned good biscuts and sausage gravy.
 
2022-04-30 11:12:16 AM  
didn't the Golden Girls eat SOS? I mean, not all the time, but istr them having it at least once?
 
2022-04-30 11:28:55 AM  
Uh huh huh uh huh. White people.
Mm mmm hmm mm hmm yeh.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-30 11:32:11 AM  

Gough: Stubby


love that.
 
2022-04-30 11:42:51 AM  
Try this for your next Dîner en Blanc!


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-30 11:49:04 AM  
Ha Subby! 35 and I grew up with SOS.

Then I discovered sausage gravy in myb2ps and ILL NEVER GO BACK. YOU CANT MAKE ME.
 
2022-04-30 11:51:24 AM  

Be polite walk on the right: also back in the day -- before you were born -- your parents performed oral sex -- and not necessarily on each other


Your mom performed oral sex as recently as last night.
 
2022-04-30 12:17:20 PM  
"I'd like Substance on Toast".
"That's the nicest thing anyone's called it today!"
 
2022-04-30 12:41:02 PM  
Waldorf Salad fight!

i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-04-30 1:10:55 PM  

catmandu: Around here SOS was ground beef and onions in a white sauce on toast. Creamed chipped beef on toast was called creamed chipped beef on toast.



Yeah, my dad used to make SOS sometimes when he had to cook dinner for us kids, but he always did it with either pork sausage or ground beef.

Also... Creamed onions are a good, good thing. 'Very old-school Nebraska farm-family food according to my grandmother.
 
Displayed 50 of 88 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.