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(Tech Xplore)   Actual scientists spent time studying the stickiness of Oreo cream and built a machine to twist them apart to measure shear strength. STEM tab narrowly able to defend against wedgie from Food tab   (techxplore.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Viscosity, Oreo, Kraft Foods, Nabisco, cookie's cream stick, Oreo cookie, Fluid mechanics, Twisted  
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250 clicks; posted to Food » and STEM » on 19 Apr 2022 at 4:56 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-04-19 5:33:40 PM  
Early Ignobel Prize candidate.

/ Top that, MIT ( Massachusetts Institute of Tollhouse )
 
2022-04-19 5:40:49 PM  
Consumers Reports does this kind of thing all the time to test the durability of stuff like the door seals on refrigerators.
 
2022-04-19 6:56:55 PM  
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2022-04-19 7:07:30 PM  
Are you telling me that stickiness coefficients aren't really just friction? I assumed this kind of stuff could just be looked up, because all the coefficients we're already published.
 
2022-04-19 7:50:32 PM  

FrancoFile: Consumers Reports does this kind of thing all the time to test the durability of stuff like the door seals on refrigerators.


Using Oreos?
 
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