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(Deslidefied)   Can't you believe nobody follows these etiquette rules anymore? Now dress appropriately, please, and get off my lawn   (deslide.clusterfake.net) divider line
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943 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 10 Apr 2022 at 9:30 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-04-10 6:54:11 AM  
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2022-04-10 7:16:27 AM  
I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.
 
2022-04-10 7:29:14 AM  
After You
Lost count of the times a door has closed on you? Holding the door for the person behind you or letting someone exit - from a bus, elevator or even shop - before you rush in is another one of those everyday gestures that displays civility.


Not in Massachusetts. We hold doors open to a fault. I mean who doesn't enjoy making a man sprint 20 feet down the sidewalk because he doesn't want you to have to hold the door open too long for him?
 
2022-04-10 7:31:07 AM  

Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.


You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.
 
2022-04-10 7:56:13 AM  
Meh.
 
2022-04-10 8:00:23 AM  
The common goddamn courtesy of a reacharound.
 
2022-04-10 8:46:13 AM  
I do all those things. Explains why I'm a nobody.
 
2022-04-10 8:56:01 AM  
if I didn't do about 98% of those things instinctually my Gammie would reach down off of her cloud and smack me
upside my head so hard you'd all feel the aftershocks.

I weep for the future.
 
2022-04-10 9:42:52 AM  
A staff member at a bar I used to go to got made at someone who held a door open for her and he got yelled at. Both people were above the age of 50.
 
2022-04-10 9:47:02 AM  

jaylectricity: Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.

You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.


I was raised to always bring a bottle of wine. That said, a lot of Europeans I know are confused by this. As one German put it: "I've chosen wines based on what I'm serving. If you bring a bottle of wine I feel obliged to serve it too, but it likely won't pair with what we're eating."
 
2022-04-10 9:48:52 AM  
When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

What a stuck-up prick.
 
2022-04-10 9:53:29 AM  
Using Personal Titles

People need to be more careful with their pronouns these days. Management at my wife's work has ordered staff to stop using "Mr.", "Ms.", etc. and go with the customer's first name unless directed otherwise.
 
2022-04-10 9:55:16 AM  

Tyrosine: jaylectricity: Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.

You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.

I was raised to always bring a bottle of wine. That said, a lot of Europeans I know are confused by this. As one German put it: "I've chosen wines based on what I'm serving. If you bring a bottle of wine I feel obliged to serve it too, but it likely won't pair with what we're eating."


It's an offering. You don't have to serve it. You don't even have to drink it that night. But next week when you decide to open the bottle you'll think of me. You'll also think of me when you're thinking of who to invite to the next party.
 
2022-04-10 10:04:28 AM  
Desliding a slideshow should be at the top of the list.
 
2022-04-10 10:05:06 AM  
Dressing Appropriately

I can still remember the look of shock on her face the first time I took my mom (who was born in 1935) into a bank and the male teller wasn't wearing a tie and his shirt wasn't tucked in or ironed. She grew up in an era when these things just didn't happen and she couldn't wrap her head around it.

Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.
 
2022-04-10 10:35:05 AM  

Tyrosine: Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.


This. I've seen PAs in the ER with full sleeve tattoos, it just doesn't seem professional. It's mostly the types drawn to ER and Trauma that are most likely to have visible tatts.

/Don't know any MDs that have tattoos, at least visible ones
//Thank god I get to wear scrubs all day
///annoyed to even wear my white coat when rounding, but we do it "for the image" in my dept
 
2022-04-10 10:41:09 AM  

kozlo: Tyrosine: Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.

This. I've seen PAs in the ER with full sleeve tattoos, it just doesn't seem professional. It's mostly the types drawn to ER and Trauma that are most likely to have visible tatts.

/Don't know any MDs that have tattoos, at least visible ones
//Thank god I get to wear scrubs all day
///annoyed to even wear my white coat when rounding, but we do it "for the image" in my dept


I read a while back that it is estimated over 50% of those under 30 now have tattoos, and a majority among them have easily visible tattoos. It's something us olders are going to have to accept as "normal" moving forward. Same thing with earrings for men. When I first got my ear pierced in 1988, it was edgy and annoying to the old folks. Now it IS the old folks sporting diamond studs in their earlobes.
 
2022-04-10 10:41:42 AM  

Tyrosine: Dressing Appropriately

I can still remember the look of shock on her face the first time I took my mom (who was born in 1935) into a bank and the male teller wasn't wearing a tie and his shirt wasn't tucked in or ironed. She grew up in an era when these things just didn't happen and she couldn't wrap her head around it.

Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.


You aren't allowed to fire anyone anymore, especially if they can claim some sort of special status. It's really obnoxious actually, especially in retail where the management should be able to hire and fire at will since the jobs are so easy and interchangeable anyway.
 
2022-04-10 10:48:48 AM  
It's been covered here already, but Mr. and Mrs/Ms. are on the way out. If you're going to be careful about misgendering someone, it's best to get in the habit of not gendering at all. At least, that's how I look at it.

Car door: my car passenger door doesn't have a keyhole, so I am unable to open the door for anyone first.

Holding open the door for others: I always assumed this was a southern custom.
 
2022-04-10 10:50:39 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: Tyrosine: Dressing Appropriately

I can still remember the look of shock on her face the first time I took my mom (who was born in 1935) into a bank and the male teller wasn't wearing a tie and his shirt wasn't tucked in or ironed. She grew up in an era when these things just didn't happen and she couldn't wrap her head around it.

Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.

You aren't allowed to fire anyone anymore, especially if they can claim some sort of special status. It's really obnoxious actually, especially in retail where the management should be able to hire and fire at will since the jobs are so easy and interchangeable anyway.


What fantasy world are you living in? Businesses can fire anyone for anything as long as they (the employee) can't prove it wasn't EEOC discrimination. That's what all the GOP-led "right to work" laws were all about.
 
2022-04-10 10:51:15 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: Tyrosine: Dressing Appropriately

I can still remember the look of shock on her face the first time I took my mom (who was born in 1935) into a bank and the male teller wasn't wearing a tie and his shirt wasn't tucked in or ironed. She grew up in an era when these things just didn't happen and she couldn't wrap her head around it.

Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.

You aren't allowed to fire anyone anymore, especially if they can claim some sort of special status. It's really obnoxious actually, especially in retail where the management should be able to hire and fire at will since the jobs are so easy and interchangeable anyway.


You can if you're in a "will to work" state. Also, the unions have been so beaten down and villainized that even if you are in a state that has some veneer of worker's rights, you don't have to pay them much.
 
2022-04-10 11:03:30 AM  

Russ1642: When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

What a stuck-up prick.


Yeah, I usually say "no problem" and it's intended as saying that what I did for them wasn't any imposition at all and no thanks are necessary.
 
2022-04-10 11:06:20 AM  

Tyrosine: Using Personal Titles

People need to be more careful with their pronouns these days. Management at my wife's work has ordered staff to stop using "Mr.", "Ms.", etc. and go with the customer's first name unless directed otherwise.


That's going to be a tough habit to break for a lot of people.  I get the not wanting to misgender issue, but I was at least raised that by default, you use people's last names unless you're already familiar with them or they otherwise ask to be called by their first name.  I'll gladly correct myself if I'm wrong, but I'll probably still be using Mr/Ms for a while yet.
 
2022-04-10 11:08:15 AM  
Winterlight:

True.... I'm 35 and my wife is 33, she has a tramp stamp from when she was 18. I have zero tattoos, but my high school girlfriend got a tramp stamp when she was 18, and reeeaaallly pressured me to do some kinda body mod. I thought about an eyebrow ring, couldn't really figure out a tattoo I could commit to, so I never did. My wife's stamp at least has meaning to it, my hs girlfriends stamp was a generic tribal design that she "designed".

I like to think that I don't care about tattoos on healthcare professionals, but I definitely notice. Outside of the hospital, I barely even notice that kind of stuff anymore, grew up with a fair share of Hot Topic kids in my day.
 
2022-04-10 11:08:28 AM  
Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies


These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

Some drivers are too harried to wait for the car in front of them to turn, scooting around into oncoming traffic or dipping into the shoulder to speed by.

That's perfectly legal in most places.
 
2022-04-10 11:11:30 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: You aren't allowed to fire anyone anymore, especially if they can claim some sort of special status. It's really obnoxious actually, especially in retail where the management should be able to hire and fire at will since the jobs are so easy and interchangeable anyway.


Work with some nurses that had a "religious exemption" note at the ready when my hospital system threatened to fire unvaccinated employees. Stupid Ohio never enforced it and our system backed down...
 
2022-04-10 11:15:52 AM  

Winterlight: kozlo: Tyrosine: Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.

This. I've seen PAs in the ER with full sleeve tattoos, it just doesn't seem professional. It's mostly the types drawn to ER and Trauma that are most likely to have visible tatts.

/Don't know any MDs that have tattoos, at least visible ones
//Thank god I get to wear scrubs all day
///annoyed to even wear my white coat when rounding, but we do it "for the image" in my dept

I read a while back that it is estimated over 50% of those under 30 now have tattoos, and a majority among them have easily visible tattoos. It's something us olders are going to have to accept as "normal" moving forward. Same thing with earrings for men. When I first got my ear pierced in 1988, it was edgy and annoying to the old folks. Now it IS the old folks sporting diamond studs in their earlobes.


I started working after uni with 2 earrings and retired wearing 3. It was a bit of a fu together with the long hair when I started, by the end it was a useful marker.
 
2022-04-10 11:17:48 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.


I'll say that depends on the company you're in.  If you encounter an older lady and do either of those things, you will absolutely make their day, since they rarely get that courtesy anymore.
 
2022-04-10 11:22:56 AM  

NeoCortex42: ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

I'll say that depends on the company you're in.  If you encounter an older lady and do either of those things, you will absolutely make their day, since they rarely get that courtesy anymore.


Well opening the car door for an elderly person when they might need assistance getting in/out is a whole other thing.
 
2022-04-10 11:25:06 AM  

ReapTheChaos: NeoCortex42: ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

I'll say that depends on the company you're in.  If you encounter an older lady and do either of those things, you will absolutely make their day, since they rarely get that courtesy anymore.

Well opening the car door for an elderly person when they might need assistance getting in/out is a whole other thing.


I'm not even saying "elderly".  If you encounter a woman that's, say 50+, and show old-fashioned basic manners, it's generally very appreciated.  I'm not saying you should feel obligated to do so, but if you want to make someone happy with a very simple gesture, it goes a long way.
 
2022-04-10 11:25:29 AM  

Winterlight: kozlo: Tyrosine: Healthcare providers with visible tattoos was also a huge shock for her. She had been a nurse at a time when there was an inspection at the start of your shift and people got fired for not having a proper clothing. Tattoos were absolutely forbidden.

This. I've seen PAs in the ER with full sleeve tattoos, it just doesn't seem professional. It's mostly the types drawn to ER and Trauma that are most likely to have visible tatts.

/Don't know any MDs that have tattoos, at least visible ones
//Thank god I get to wear scrubs all day
///annoyed to even wear my white coat when rounding, but we do it "for the image" in my dept

I read a while back that it is estimated over 50% of those under 30 now have tattoos, and a majority among them have easily visible tattoos. It's something us olders are going to have to accept as "normal" moving forward. Same thing with earrings for men. When I first got my ear pierced in 1988, it was edgy and annoying to the old folks. Now it IS the old folks sporting diamond studs in their earlobes.


My first thought when tattoos really started to become mainstream was, how do you think that tramp stamp or neck tattoo is going to look when you're a 70 year old grandma?
 
2022-04-10 11:30:31 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

Some drivers are too harried to wait for the car in front of them to turn, scooting around into oncoming traffic or dipping into the shoulder to speed by.

That's perfectly legal in most places.


Wrong wrong wrong. Opening doors is being polite. I'm a guy raised in Chicago and hold open doors for anyone. It's not about "being a gentleman" or "chivalry" but about being polite to others. A little courtesy is appreciated by everyone. My doing that is not to show I'm superior or you are weak but that I care enough about a fellow human to do something nice for them and maybe leave them feeling better about the world. Giving them a smile is also a nice thing to do.
 
2022-04-10 11:37:45 AM  
When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

First off, get off your Millennial bashing high horse. I'm a Boomer and "no problem" has been in use since I was a kid. It's basically just a less formal way of saying you're welcome, but its usage has become more widespread over time and there's some distinct differences based on context.

No problem. - It was a simple task that took me little or no effort at all.

You're welcome. - The task took some degree of time and effort, but I was perfectly happy to do it.
 
2022-04-10 11:41:25 AM  

Slypork: ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

Some drivers are too harried to wait for the car in front of them to turn, scooting around into oncoming traffic or dipping into the shoulder to speed by.

That's perfectly legal in most places.

Wrong wrong wrong. Opening doors is being polite. I'm a guy raised in Chicago and hold open doors for anyone. It's not about "being a gentleman" or "chivalry" but about being polite to others. A little courtesy is appreciated by everyone. My doing that is not to show I'm superior or you are weak but that I care enough about a fellow human to do something nice for them and maybe leave them feeling better about the world. Giving them a smile is also a nice thing to do.


Um, I'm referring to opening the car door, not doors in public places.
 
2022-04-10 12:20:20 PM  

jaylectricity: After You
Lost count of the times a door has closed on you? Holding the door for the person behind you or letting someone exit - from a bus, elevator or even shop - before you rush in is another one of those everyday gestures that displays civility.

Not in Massachusetts. We hold doors open to a fault. I mean who doesn't enjoy making a man sprint 20 feet down the sidewalk because he doesn't want you to have to hold the door open too long for him?


Yeah, those people can suck both barrels.

Also though, if I hold the door for you and say "after you," get through the goddamned door instead of ostentatiously saying "no after you" and forcing me to hold it longer for nothing. Ditto for being waved through intersections.
 
2022-04-10 12:21:04 PM  

jaylectricity: Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.

You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.


You are a gentleman
 
2022-04-10 12:22:52 PM  

Tyrosine: jaylectricity: Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.

You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.

I was raised to always bring a bottle of wine. That said, a lot of Europeans I know are confused by this. As one German put it: "I've chosen wines based on what I'm serving. If you bring a bottle of wine I feel obliged to serve it too, but it likely won't pair with what we're eating."


I always thought it was a bit gauche to expect to drink the stuff you brought as a gift unless there was no other wine
 
2022-04-10 12:24:05 PM  

jaylectricity: Tyrosine: jaylectricity: Xythero: I agree with #1. If your having a party you shouldn't ask people to bring anything and especially don't ask people to pay you.  As a guest it's nice to bring something as a gift but you shouldn't be asked to.  There are some exceptions to that rule like if it's a potluck or your sister asks if you could make the potato salad she likes for her cookout but generally don't do it.

You don't ask anybody to bring anything, but as a guest you should always ask to bring something. If the host insists you don't bring anything, bring a bottle of wine.

My favorite, for summer parties, is to show up with a bag of ice. They always need more ice. And if they don't, the ice melts and they're left with a small bit of plastic to throw away.

I was raised to always bring a bottle of wine. That said, a lot of Europeans I know are confused by this. As one German put it: "I've chosen wines based on what I'm serving. If you bring a bottle of wine I feel obliged to serve it too, but it likely won't pair with what we're eating."

It's an offering. You don't have to serve it. You don't even have to drink it that night. But next week when you decide to open the bottle you'll think of me. You'll also think of me when you're thinking of who to invite to the next party.


Listen, the next time you're in DC you have a standing invitation
 
2022-04-10 12:32:13 PM  

NeoCortex42: Russ1642: When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

What a stuck-up prick.

Yeah, I usually say "no problem" and it's intended as saying that what I did for them wasn't any imposition at all and no thanks are necessary.


Agreed, I can't imagine being triggered by "no problem."
"Super easy, not even an inconvenience!"
 
2022-04-10 12:33:20 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Slypork: ReapTheChaos: Opening the Car Door for a Lady
Stand Up for the Ladies

These are two that are better left to die off. Any guy still doing this likely wears a fedora so he can tip it and say M'lady as he passes women on the street.

Some drivers are too harried to wait for the car in front of them to turn, scooting around into oncoming traffic or dipping into the shoulder to speed by.

That's perfectly legal in most places.

Wrong wrong wrong. Opening doors is being polite. I'm a guy raised in Chicago and hold open doors for anyone. It's not about "being a gentleman" or "chivalry" but about being polite to others. A little courtesy is appreciated by everyone. My doing that is not to show I'm superior or you are weak but that I care enough about a fellow human to do something nice for them and maybe leave them feeling better about the world. Giving them a smile is also a nice thing to do.

Um, I'm referring to opening the car door, not doors in public places.


I open car doors for my wife or friends if I'm on the passenger side when they're getting in. Always have, always will. It's being polite. I've had friends open the car door for me as they are passing by. I don't close the door because they sometimes need time to get settled or get the belt on so don't want to rush them.
 
2022-04-10 12:38:55 PM  

Tyrosine: Using Personal Titles

People need to be more careful with their pronouns these days. Management at my wife's work has ordered staff to stop using "Mr.", "Ms.", etc. and go with the customer's first name unless directed otherwise.


People don't need to be more careful.

If you go with the most common sense one based on what the person in front of you presents as, you'll be right in 99.9% of cases. That one in a thousand will just comment about the error in a polite way, and if you need to deal with that person in future occassions you can remember it.

/If the person doesn't reply in a polite way, just burn bridges because screw that noise
 
2022-04-10 12:47:14 PM  
I always support dressing appropriately. My father-in-law passed away last month. His brother-in-law wore jeans and his best sweatshirt to his funeral. You're 66 years old, buy a goddamn pair of slacks.

I was at a visitation once for a friend and a grown man wore athletic shorts and a T-shirt. Ridiculous.
 
2022-04-10 1:14:30 PM  

edmo: I do all those things. Explains why I'm a nobody.


I generally don't stand up automatically when a lady enters the room, but I probably should.
 
2022-04-10 1:19:16 PM  

Iowan73: I always support dressing appropriately. My father-in-law passed away last month. His brother-in-law wore jeans and his best sweatshirt to his funeral. You're 66 years old, buy a goddamn pair of slacks.

I was at a visitation once for a friend and a grown man wore athletic shorts and a T-shirt. Ridiculous.


Used to be able to count on older people to dress appropriately, nicely, when in public.  This is an area where Boomers have fallen down.  F*cking tracksuits to a Sunday morning breakfast/brunch.
 
2022-04-10 1:25:52 PM  
(slightly) nsfw
A Bronx Tale - The Door Test/ Full Version
Youtube HAJdqzRM6Dw
 
2022-04-10 1:48:42 PM  

Billy Liar: Iowan73: I always support dressing appropriately. My father-in-law passed away last month. His brother-in-law wore jeans and his best sweatshirt to his funeral. You're 66 years old, buy a goddamn pair of slacks.

I was at a visitation once for a friend and a grown man wore athletic shorts and a T-shirt. Ridiculous.

Used to be able to count on older people to dress appropriately, nicely, when in public.  This is an area where Boomers have fallen down.  F*cking tracksuits to a Sunday morning breakfast/brunch.


I get annoyed when I have to tell boomers to take their hats off so I can do an exam. I don't know how many times I had it drilled in my head that it's uncivilized to wear a hat inside and I especially expect old people to to have been trained in that as well.
 
2022-04-10 2:08:10 PM  

NeoCortex42: Tyrosine: Using Personal Titles

People need to be more careful with their pronouns these days. Management at my wife's work has ordered staff to stop using "Mr.", "Ms.", etc. and go with the customer's first name unless directed otherwise.

That's going to be a tough habit to break for a lot of people.  I get the not wanting to misgender issue, but I was at least raised that by default, you use people's last names unless you're already familiar with them or they otherwise ask to be called by their first name.  I'll gladly correct myself if I'm wrong, but I'll probably still be using Mr/Ms for a while yet.


The thing I noticed was, at the doctor's, there's a waiting room full of people, and the assistant calls out "Diane?" or "Mark?" and there's often a couple people that get up, thinking that it's them.  Then comes the inevitable fistfight.  First names are more common, more likely to be shared than last names.  Not a big problem, I guess, just something I noticed.
 
2022-04-10 2:31:10 PM  
Hell, I open the car door for mrs bughunter even when she's driving.

In fact, I stand a step further out in the street and stare down approaching drivers as she gets in:  Make room, assholes.
 
2022-04-10 3:04:03 PM  

Fano: NeoCortex42: Russ1642: When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

What a stuck-up prick.

Yeah, I usually say "no problem" and it's intended as saying that what I did for them wasn't any imposition at all and no thanks are necessary.

Agreed, I can't imagine being triggered by "no problem."
"Super easy, not even an inconvenience!"


The "boils my blood" got this image in my head of some red-faced boomer stroking out on the floor of a JC Penney, dying from his apoplectic rage at hearing a 20-something sales associate say "no problem".
 
2022-04-10 3:18:55 PM  

Fano: NeoCortex42: Russ1642: When you say thank you to most anyone in a store these days, especially millennials, the reply, invariably, is "No problem." Boils my blood. No, the correct response is "You're welcome."

What a stuck-up prick.

Yeah, I usually say "no problem" and it's intended as saying that what I did for them wasn't any imposition at all and no thanks are necessary.

Agreed, I can't imagine being triggered by "no problem."
"Super easy, not even an inconvenience!"


Yeah, this one boggled me too.

De nada is the customary polite reply to Gracias in most Spanish-speaking cultures.

/It literally means of nada
 
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