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(Gizmodo)   Old and tepid: residual chlorine and traces of medications in your drinking water. New radioactive hotness: uranium in your drinking water   (gizmodo.com) divider line
    More: Scary, United States Environmental Protection Agency, unsafe levels of uranium, Drinking water, water supply, water systems, High levels of acute uranium exposure, Safe Drinking Water Act, authors of this new research  
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421 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 Apr 2022 at 6:52 PM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-04-07 6:56:59 PM  
Old is new again.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-07 7:02:39 PM  
We are going to need a bigger scary tag
 
2022-04-07 7:03:15 PM  
Serve it up in some uranium glass.
d3h6k4kfl8m9p0.cloudfront.netView Full Size
 
2022-04-07 7:03:17 PM  
I am sure i have drank plenty of radon.  It goes with the territory.   Let me guess this uranium contamination is mainly located in the sw
 
2022-04-07 7:14:47 PM  

Saiga410: I am sure i have drank plenty of radon.  It goes with the territory.   Let me guess this uranium contamination is mainly located in the sw


Mostly in the Southwest and in the Central Midwest according to the article. The Central Midwest is where all the glaciers dumped off all the sediment when they retreated and a lot of it was granite, and granite contains veins of crystals containing uranium.
 
2022-04-07 8:03:22 PM  

eyeq360: Saiga410: I am sure i have drank plenty of radon.  It goes with the territory.   Let me guess this uranium contamination is mainly located in the sw

Mostly in the Southwest and in the Central Midwest according to the article. The Central Midwest is where all the glaciers dumped off all the sediment when they retreated and a lot of it was granite, and granite contains veins of crystals containing uranium.


You're forgetting all the abandoned mines in Colorado.  Uranium in the Arkansas already.

It can fight it out with the PTFE coursing thru my veins (probably).
 
2022-04-07 8:14:29 PM  
It being a heavy metal is probably more harmful than its radioactivity.
 
2022-04-07 9:12:36 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: eyeq360: Saiga410: I am sure i have drank plenty of radon.  It goes with the territory.   Let me guess this uranium contamination is mainly located in the sw

Mostly in the Southwest and in the Central Midwest according to the article. The Central Midwest is where all the glaciers dumped off all the sediment when they retreated and a lot of it was granite, and granite contains veins of crystals containing uranium.

You're forgetting all the abandoned mines in Colorado.  Uranium in the Arkansas already.

It can fight it out with the PTFE coursing thru my veins (probably).


That too, at least for the Arkansas River system. There's also helium fields in Western Kansas as the helium likely comes from uranium decay in bedrock granite.
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size

Most of Kansas has higher radon levels than the EPA recommended level. So Kansas is screwed when it comes to radon.
ksre.k-state.eduView Full Size
 
2022-04-07 9:30:32 PM  
I am not sure how old someone has to be, but there is a very odd way of thinking running through the developed world. It ties in with a lot of social upheaval going on, and it is not necessarily a good thing.

Do we really expect to live perfect lives in a perfect environment?

Because if that is the goal, we clearly can't afford it, we would not be willing to change our lives to make it possible, and it probably would not be good for us anyway.

So someone will say that we should not just shrug and throw up our hands and ignore this or that. Sure. Of course, but generally speaking, people are healthier than they have ever been, with access to clean safe water, clean safe food, healthy environments, safe jobs, etc. Indeed, it seems that worry, stress and poor habits are doing most of the killing in developed countries.

The marginal benefit of dicking around with what is probably more or less safe water is about nil. The costs are probably far out of proportion to that nearly zero benefit. Let's not pretend that lowering speed limits by 5 miles per hour would not save 1000 times more lives than jerking around with radon limits. Raising carbon taxes would do much more in the long run. Etc.

Part of the way that the future world is supposed to work is that we are going to have a whole bunch of people, probably 10% of the workforce, running around telling us how to make our lives better. That will be their job. I sincerely hope that they will not be so lazy as to think that their job is simply fear mongering.

And I might as well be the first to say it: people have been drinking naturally irradiated water for a really long time and have turned out to be extremely healthy, living long lives. I won't call that water a magical elixir if everyone agrees not to call it a hazardous poison.
 
2022-04-07 9:31:37 PM  
Steel has been contaminated since the 50s, so much so that scientists need to dredge up shipwrecks to make certain kind of sensors and devices from old uncontaminated steel.
 
2022-04-07 9:47:01 PM  
This is probably also the thread where I share that, as a child, I used to play at a family place near Idaho Springs, CO. The property was right next to an abandoned mine. We fantasized that it was a gold mine, but we found out later that they were mining uranium and other metals. It had been moderately successful.

The most fun any kid could have was in the pools of rock dust and tailings near the mine. After a wet season or really good runoff, the muck would be this adobe colored goo that was of indeterminate depth. But it was goo down to 5 feet at least. The pools were probably 50 m across.

And when we got hot, we would drink from the creek.

A reasonably cautious person would do none of that today. I suppose reasonable caution these days is designed to prevent some 1 in a million outcome. Reasonable caution when I was growing up was what was supposed to keep you alive until sundown. The latter is not better, but the former is probably overdoing it.

I look forward to a world with incremental, reasonable improvement in health and safety, without a lot of hysteria about trivial matters and freak accidents.
 
2022-04-07 10:10:32 PM  

Russ1642: It being a heavy metal is probably more harmful than its radioactivity.


Came here to say exactly this.  Uranium is very toxic in addition to being radio active.
 
2022-04-07 10:57:23 PM  

eyeq360: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: eyeq360: Saiga410: I am sure i have drank plenty of radon.  It goes with the territory.   Let me guess this uranium contamination is mainly located in the sw

Mostly in the Southwest and in the Central Midwest according to the article. The Central Midwest is where all the glaciers dumped off all the sediment when they retreated and a lot of it was granite, and granite contains veins of crystals containing uranium.

You're forgetting all the abandoned mines in Colorado.  Uranium in the Arkansas already.

It can fight it out with the PTFE coursing thru my veins (probably).

That too, at least for the Arkansas River system. There's also helium fields in Western Kansas as the helium likely comes from uranium decay in bedrock granite.
[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x462]
Most of Kansas has higher radon levels than the EPA recommended level. So Kansas is screwed when it comes to radon.
[ksre.k-state.edu image 520x401]


Sadly not killing NEAR ENOUGH Red scum.
 
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