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(Medium)   The (Im-)Possibility of Artificial Gravity. The future of space exploration depends on it   (antoniomelonio-cosmos.medium.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, major problem, Universe, Space, Time, General relativity, final frontier, Gottfried Leibniz, Spacetime  
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1028 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Apr 2022 at 12:47 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



26 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-04-01 12:24:03 PM  
Too much spin in this article.
 
2022-04-01 12:37:05 PM  
Articles like this are why we can't have a nice educated population.
 
2022-04-01 12:56:29 PM  

snocone: Articles like this are why we can't have a nice educated population.


This is the second article I've read by this fellow. His prose reads nicely enough, which is creditable, but both articles seem underdeveloped.
 
2022-04-01 12:56:33 PM  
The Expanse did it.
 
2022-04-01 1:10:30 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-01 1:10:39 PM  
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2022-04-01 1:25:23 PM  
As a result, astronauts must exercise constantly to stay in shape and not disappoint their partners upon return.

Wut?
 
2022-04-01 1:25:26 PM  
TL, DR; There is no such thing as artificial gravity. Instead, let's propose something new!

They then go on to cover something that has been covered in sci fi since the 30s, and was even displayed wonderfully by Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey, with the GIF posted upthread.
 
2022-04-01 1:26:04 PM  

Uzzah: As a result, astronauts must exercise constantly to stay in shape and not disappoint their partners upon return.

Wut?


Dumb farking waste of time article, let's just leave it at that.
 
2022-04-01 1:52:25 PM  

Uzzah: As a result, astronauts must exercise constantly to stay in shape and not disappoint their partners upon return.

Wut?


Water was cold! Gravity was low!
 
2022-04-01 2:16:36 PM  

Mikey1969: TL, DR; There is no such thing as artificial gravity. Instead, let's propose something new!

They then go on to cover something that has been covered in sci fi since the 30s, and was even displayed wonderfully by Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey, with the GIF posted upthread.


Dont know much about gravity other than the space aliens appear to have mastered it
 
2022-04-01 2:26:03 PM  
And as always, xkcd comes through (on the difficulty of "real" artificial gravity).  Granted, I didn't get that far before bailing on this poor excuse for an "article".

imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size


The key is the mouseover punchline:

Of these four forces, there's one we don't really understand
Is it the weak force or the strong"-
It's gravity.

Linux_Yes: Farkied: (favorite: "It's easy. Just ask the aliens how they do it")
...
ont know much about gravity other than the space aliens appear to have mastere  it
 
2022-04-01 2:33:39 PM  
Artificial Gravity: The future of space exploration depends on it

That sucks.
 
2022-04-01 2:35:09 PM  
So we will just like make real gravity, man

*hits blunt*
 
2022-04-01 3:09:51 PM  
Wow that article was farking nothing.
 
2022-04-01 4:42:40 PM  
I remember playing a game called Space Engineers and I made a ship drive that used the artificial gravity generator and artificial mass-generation machines to generate a gravity drive that effectively forced the ship forward by "falling" in that direction. Thrusters could be used to adjust the trajectory and you could alter the gravity generator's field strength to control your acceleration. This could also be used for a shield against projectiles by placing opposed field generators along the hull to create a strong field that would deflect objects
 
2022-04-01 5:21:57 PM  
The future of erf depends on it.
 
2022-04-01 6:27:16 PM  
Gravity is not just a good idea. It's the law.
 
2022-04-01 8:50:35 PM  
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2022-04-01 8:56:46 PM  
Well, it's a secret process I invented, based on an isotope of helium and...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-04-01 9:06:44 PM  

Sanguine Dawn: I remember playing a game called Space Engineers and I made a ship drive that used the artificial gravity generator and artificial mass-generation machines to generate a gravity drive that effectively forced the ship forward by "falling" in that direction. Thrusters could be used to adjust the trajectory and you could alter the gravity generator's field strength to control your acceleration. This could also be used for a shield against projectiles by placing opposed field generators along the hull to create a strong field that would deflect objects


I mean that's the thing. If there is a device we can use to negate or magnify the effects of mass in a very localized area then theres an entire enchilada of magical technology available.

It would be a leap equivalent to discovering electricity or radio waves.

But as far as we know it's not possible, and it doesn't look like a hurdle we'll be able to leap.

Take Trek for instance. Their technology has to be able to generate an entire planet's-worth of gravity at any point in an interior space and yet somehow translate NONE of that effect to the ship itself.

Everyone talks about how fanciful warp drive or transporters are but the most ridiculously improbable tech in the entire  show is artificial gravity.
 
2022-04-02 1:07:42 AM  
Arks where generations of people live, die, wage wars, hold contentious elections, debate interpretations of religious scripture, and read highly interesting popular science articles on the internet.

I don't think a space ship would even survive one bullet, never mind a war. Also, religion has no place in space, or even future society.
 
2022-04-02 2:37:02 AM  
It seems like it would be simpler to use medical technology to speed up adaptation to low-gravity environments and then to use med tech again to speed up adaptation to high-gravity environments when needed.

It's not as though other planets will have conditions exactly the same as earth's, so humans will have to adapt, anyway. May as well just get to it.
 
2022-04-02 4:27:49 AM  

johnphantom: Arks where generations of people live, die, wage wars, hold contentious elections, debate interpretations of religious scripture, and read highly interesting popular science articles on the internet.

I don't think a space ship would even survive one bullet, never mind a war. Also, religion has no place in space, or even future society.


https://www.wtf.tw/ref/herbert.html
 
2022-04-02 5:47:36 AM  

Mikey1969: TL, DR; There is no such thing as artificial gravity. Instead, let's propose something new!

They then go on to cover something that has been covered in sci fi since the 30s, and was even displayed wonderfully by Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey, with the GIF posted upthread.


But I was assured artificial gravity plating existed just like warp drive and transporters.

Heim Theory gives a glimpse into an alternative theory of gravity that would be awesome as part of a sci-fi story as it means both warp drive and antigravity and big rotating superconductors and blind German scientists.
 
2022-04-02 11:12:37 AM  

LewDux: johnphantom: Arks where generations of people live, die, wage wars, hold contentious elections, debate interpretations of religious scripture, and read highly interesting popular science articles on the internet.

I don't think a space ship would even survive one bullet, never mind a war. Also, religion has no place in space, or even future society.

https://www.wtf.tw/ref/herbert.html


What does fiction have to do with space, or science?
 
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