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(Bon Appetit)   You cannot bake without a scale. You are a shiatty person if you attempt to do so. You will always fail if you do not use one. Now, may I show you these scales we have for sale?   (bonappetit.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Chocolate chip cookie, Bread, Cookie, Baking, Cake, King Arthur Flour, baking scale, Measuring cup  
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416 clicks; posted to Food » on 28 Mar 2022 at 11:50 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-03-28 11:03:34 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size



I use one of these
 
2022-03-28 11:09:36 AM  

whyRpeoplesostupid: [Fark user image 650x322]


I use one of these


Are you "baking" crack?
 
2022-03-28 11:42:36 AM  
Author of TFA is an asshole.

If I had a time machine, I'd take him back and feed him my Mom's baking, and dare him to tell her to her face that she was doing it wrong.

(She *did* have a scale - a box thing with a platform on top, and a big dial on the front, used springs.  Must have dated from the 40s or so.  She used it three or four times a year.)
 
2022-03-28 11:49:17 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: whyRpeoplesostupid: [Fark user image 650x322]


I use one of these

Are you "baking" crack?


You misspelled 'smoking'
 
2022-03-28 11:51:41 AM  
For a scale that omits calibrations for smidgen, pinch, dash, dollop, notch, capfull, hand full, and bunch, it is too expensive.
 
2022-03-28 11:59:18 AM  
I have a kitchen scale. I think everyone should.

That being said, cook how you feel like cooking. If you like adding a dash or dollop here and there, then do it. Make yourself happy in the kitchen.

I primarily use my scale making pizza dough. It makes it fool proof and perfect every time.
 
2022-03-28 12:10:03 PM  
I took over the cooking duties when I retired, 4 years ago. For the first couple of weeks, I struggled with Mrs LE's old top-pan mechanical scale, which registered a different weight every time to tapped it.

Finally, the plastic top-pan accidentally broke. OK, I had to throw it on the floor and stamp on it a couple of times, but from the moment I replaced it with the digital electronic scale with lovely stainless steel bowl (£14.50 from Amazon) which coincidentally arrived the next day, my baking improved. So, I guess,

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-03-28 12:10:06 PM  
I use the Artisan Bread in 10 Minutes a Day method.  Flour, salt, yeast, water all by volume.

No scale needed.
 
2022-03-28 12:17:00 PM  

FrancoFile: I use the Artisan Bread in 10 Minutes a Day method.  Flour, salt, yeast, water all by volume.

No scale needed.


Aren't you also the one who claimed that "if your giardiniera has oil in it you're doing it wrong"?
 
2022-03-28 12:24:41 PM  
To be fair, you should be measuring by weight.  Powders can settle, especially sifted flour, liquid volumes change with temperature, square cubes of butter are impossible to measure by volume, and so on.  Measuring by weight assures you always have precisely the correct amount of whatever it is you're making regardless of any other conditions.  That goes for any type of cooking, not just baking, but it's less important with regular cooking when you're just measuring spoons of spices and such -- you have a lot more leeway there.  Baking requires more precision.
 
2022-03-28 12:37:49 PM  

NINEv2: FrancoFile: I use the Artisan Bread in 10 Minutes a Day method.  Flour, salt, yeast, water all by volume.

No scale needed.

Aren't you also the one who claimed that "if your giardiniera has oil in it you're doing it wrong"?


That sounds like me.  Could be a regional thing; I'm not a fine of the finely chopped stuff that they put on sandwiches in Chicago.  (celery?  seriously?).  Does that style have oil in it?

I want my giardinieira as an antipasto or a snack, not a sandwich topping a la muffaletta.
 
2022-03-28 12:38:32 PM  
There is definitely a contingent of Farkers who already own gram scales...
 
2022-03-28 12:39:11 PM  
Measuring by weight is more accurate. But millions of bakers from Antiquity through today did fine without them through experience and being taught subtle distinction in feel, color, smell, etc. My Mom never used a scale but would modify how much flour to use, how much to knead or mix, etc. on the fly. She just knew subtle things about the density of different ingredients, the qualities of different strains of yeast, temperature and humidity through years of experience
 
2022-03-28 12:39:36 PM  
I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.
 
2022-03-28 12:40:40 PM  

Psychopusher: To be fair, you should be measuring by weight.  ....  Baking requires more precision.


Flour is really the only ingredient where a scale is genuinely useful. Other ingredients don't change density enough to make a difference.

A good thermometer is vastly more important than an accurate scale.

I mostly use my scale to avoid mucking up my measuring cups so I have fewer things to wash.
 
2022-03-28 12:42:04 PM  

squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.


Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?
 
2022-03-28 12:48:36 PM  
It's bull shait.

Unless you have a commercial kitchen and use consistently sourced ingrediencies.

Okay. How much does a cup of flour weight?
 
2022-03-28 12:49:47 PM  

olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?


I wish I could think of a good joke answer right now.

But, lamination is a baking term, that refers to layers (or the process of creating layers) of butter/dough, which is the basic way to make puff pastry, and it's cousin, croissant dough.
 
2022-03-28 12:52:02 PM  

olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?


Lamination is a baking term used to describe building up layers of 'fat/dough/fat/dough' and fold them over.
Much like you're expect in a good biscuit or croissant.

Seriously....do you even google a term before jumping in to show your ignorance of basic concepts?
 
2022-03-28 12:54:27 PM  

optikeye: olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?

Lamination is a baking term used to describe building up layers of 'fat/dough/fat/dough' and fold them over.
Much like you're expect in a good biscuit or croissant.

Seriously....do you even google a term before jumping in to show your ignorance of basic concepts?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-03-28 12:57:09 PM  

optikeye: olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?

Lamination is a baking term used to describe building up layers of 'fat/dough/fat/dough' and fold them over.
Much like you're expect in a good biscuit or croissant.

Seriously....do you even google a term before jumping in to show your ignorance of basic concepts?


And I never claimed it was a good joke, but...

Seriously. Do you even interact with Fark much outside of TFD/LP these days? 80% of my posts here are snarky comments, and I've been doing it for a long time.
 
2022-03-28 12:58:51 PM  

olrasputin: optikeye: olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?

Lamination is a baking term used to describe building up layers of 'fat/dough/fat/dough' and fold them over.
Much like you're expect in a good biscuit or croissant.

Seriously....do you even google a term before jumping in to show your ignorance of basic concepts?

And I never claimed it was a good joke, but...

Seriously. Do you even interact with Fark much outside of TFD/LP these days? 80% of my posts here are snarky comments, and I've been doing it for a long time.


That's a pretty odd thing to brag about. It's like OMG I CAN PUT MY THUMB IN MY NOSE kidna thing.
 
2022-03-28 1:02:39 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: Flour is really the only ingredient where a scale is genuinely useful. Other ingredients don't change density enough to make a difference.


Flour and butter (or other solid fat) I would argue, unless you want to soften the butter enough that you can pat it down into a measuring cup to get an accurate volume reading.  But now you have to clean a greasy measuring cup.

TofuTheAlmighty: A good thermometer is vastly more important than an accurate scale.


For candy-making, sure; there's not a lot of room for error when heating to soft- or hard-ball stage (+/-5° generally), and you have to disturb the sugar as little as possible to avoid crystalization, so no jabbing a thermometer in there periodically.  Best to have an accurate one you can leave in.  Chocolate, too, needs very specific temperature fluctuations for proper tempering.  But if you're just making a caramel sauce or something, a thermometer is less important.  Cakes and pies don't even need one.
 
2022-03-28 1:02:59 PM  
I use a scale for baking because it makes things foolproof. I calculate my weights at a 5:3 flour to liquid ratio, dump everything into my KitchenAid, turn it on and walk away for ten minutes. Never have to add anything to adjust for a dough that's too wet or dry, and it only takes a few minutes of actual work to have a loaf of fresh bread or some pizza dough ready to go.

It also makes it really easy to adapt bread recipes, since most of them are some variation of "take x cups of flour and add y cups of water, adding more as needed to make a dough." Weigh the flour first, do some basic math to find the needed liquid weight, and you're good to go.
 
2022-03-28 1:05:26 PM  

optikeye: olrasputin: optikeye: olrasputin: squegeebooo: I try my best to only use recipes that are weight based, esp. if you're first learning it, knowing that you have the ingredients correct, so you can trouble shoot other issues (humidity, oven temp differences, whatever) is really helpful.

For some recipes having it exact is super important, for other recipes, less so, and by the same token, for some ingredients.

I will say, that my sourdough bread, I weigh it, but def. on a 'close enough', where even 20 grams off in either direction is fine for the flour or water, the dough has a slightly different consistency, but the end results are always great.

But for my croissants, I notice even a small difference in it, to dry it doesn't roll out great, too wet, it sticks and rips, ruining the lamination.

Weighing is pretty clearly the more precise approach, but can we stop for a second to discuss why you're having your croissants laminated?

Lamination is a baking term used to describe building up layers of 'fat/dough/fat/dough' and fold them over.
Much like you're expect in a good biscuit or croissant.

Seriously....do you even google a term before jumping in to show your ignorance of basic concepts?

And I never claimed it was a good joke, but...

Seriously. Do you even interact with Fark much outside of TFD/LP these days? 80% of my posts here are snarky comments, and I've been doing it for a long time.

That's a pretty odd thing to brag about. It's like OMG I CAN PUT MY THUMB IN MY NOSE kidna thing.


K. Was I bragging? Hmmm.

Maybe you need more coffee. Or less coffee. Or my sympathies for whatever trainwreck is occurring in your personal life at the moment.

At any rate, you're kinda being a douchebag for no reason, and it'd be great if you stopped that. This isn't the correct tab for it.
 
2022-03-28 1:14:26 PM  

optikeye: It's bull shait.

Unless you have a commercial kitchen and use consistently sourced ingrediencies.

Okay. How much does a cup of flour weight?


125 grams.

A scale is helpful in baking, allowing you to add stuff to a single bowl without dirtying other stuff. It's crucial to getting the rice/water ratio right when you rinse rice before closing your cooker.

But a scale is crucial for serious breadmaking, since it's so much easier to figure out how much water and flour you need when you're working with baker's ratios rather than dry cups and liquid cups.

For my everyday sourdough, the ratio is 80 percent water to flour, with 20 percent starter and 2 percent salt. I can make one loaf or 10, without having to consult a recipe book or to measure out 4 or 40 cups of flour.
 
2022-03-28 1:15:40 PM  

TofuTheAlmighty: A good thermometer is vastly more important than an accurate scale.


And to this I'll just say, why not both?  For the amount of use they'll get neither is very expensive.

For a scale I'd go with the Oxo one, where the top snaps off for easy cleaning and the digital readout can be pulled aways from the base for easier reading if you have a large bowl on it. For a thermometer you can't go wrong with a thermapen.

But yes, if you can only buy one, I'd lean towards thermometer.


As for the headline, I still don't get this complaining about "ads" but then giving them the clicks from this site.  Not to mention are publications centered around a specific topic not supposed to offer product reviews?
 
2022-03-28 1:16:10 PM  
What if I have a scale but I don't bake?
 
2022-03-28 1:22:59 PM  

Psychopusher: TofuTheAlmighty: Flour is really the only ingredient where a scale is genuinely useful. Other ingredients don't change density enough to make a difference.

Flour and butter (or other solid fat) I would argue, unless you want to soften the butter enough that you can pat it down into a measuring cup to get an accurate volume reading.  But now you have to clean a greasy measuring cup.

TofuTheAlmighty: A good thermometer is vastly more important than an accurate scale.

For candy-making, sure; there's not a lot of room for error when heating to soft- or hard-ball stage (+/-5° generally), and you have to disturb the sugar as little as possible to avoid crystalization, so no jabbing a thermometer in there periodically.  Best to have an accurate one you can leave in.  Chocolate, too, needs very specific temperature fluctuations for proper tempering.  But if you're just making a caramel sauce or something, a thermometer is less important.  Cakes and pies don't even need one.


One great use for a thermometer, is if it's your first time or two doing a recipe (or if you screwed up a step to adjust oven temp), knowing the correct range of temps for a bake to be done can be great.  Esp. when you're really used to another style, where your gut instincts on done could be totally wrong for this style, or for something that's dark to begin with, where you can't look for the browning of the crust.

I don't do enriched bread a lot, so I'll temp prob. towards the end for example just to make sure.
 
2022-03-28 1:24:27 PM  
I bake fine without a scale. FWIW, I've never baked bread from scratch. I make moist cupcakes and pound cake, crispy cookies, etc. The stuff turns out fine, no complaints so far.

While baking does require specific ratios of wet to dry, it's not so inflexible that if you have a tablespoon more of flour it'll completely ruin the cake or whatever. Precise measurements of baking soda or powder is obviously important, but since those are generally measured in tsp, not that big of a deal. I mean, use a scale, it's fine, but it's not really necessary.

What ruins baked goods more than anything is errors in temperature. Usually overbaking. And also not following recipes. There are only so many substitutions you can make (or even 1 substitution, if it's an important one, like the kind of flour) before you're basically not making the thing from the recipe, you've changed it enough it's no longer really the same and thus results are basically a crap shoot.
 
2022-03-28 1:33:09 PM  

animal color: 125 grams.


Nope.

Gold medal AP flour is 130 grams
Bob's Red Mill AP flour is 112 grams
While King Arthur AP is 115 grams
And yes, standard AP lunchroom flour is 125ish...maybe


Plus weight/cup can vary for flour due to seasonal blend of flour and humidity.
Yes it's a good starting point...but not a blindly slavish devotion when baking, which you really need to have a touch and feel for the dough.
 
2022-03-28 1:45:19 PM  

optikeye: animal color: 125 grams.

Nope.

Gold medal AP flour is 130 grams
Bob's Red Mill AP flour is 112 grams
While King Arthur AP is 115 grams
And yes, standard AP lunchroom flour is 125ish...maybe


Plus weight/cup can vary for flour due to seasonal blend of flour and humidity.
Yes it's a good starting point...but not a blindly slavish devotion when baking, which you really need to have a touch and feel for the dough.


The four types of King Arthur flour in my kitchen all say 120g/cup
 
2022-03-28 1:45:58 PM  
Did no-one teach you people how to measure butter by volume by displacing water?

Let's say you need a 1/3rd of a cup of butter. Get your one cup measure. Put 2/3rds of a cup of water in it. Put your best guess of the amount of butter you need onto a spoon. Lower the spoon into the water until the butter is submerged.

If the water comes up to the 1 cup mark, you've got it!
 
2022-03-28 1:48:26 PM  

Psychopusher: To be fair, you should be measuring by weight.  Powders can settle, especially sifted flour, liquid volumes change with temperature, square cubes of butter are impossible to measure by volume, and so on.  Measuring by weight assures you always have precisely the correct amount of whatever it is you're making regardless of any other conditions.  That goes for any type of cooking, not just baking, but it's less important with regular cooking when you're just measuring spoons of spices and such -- you have a lot more leeway there.  Baking requires more precision.


Even there it depends on what you are baking. I use a scale for new recipes but the ones I have that have been handed down through the family get measured BUT I use my sifter to make sure that I don't put too much flour in since great grannie on down also always sifted their dry ingredients. Sifting also helps to distribute the powdered leavening/salt/cocoa/etc. before mixing with the wet ingredients. Sift the flour, measure out desired amount, sift again with additional dry ingredients. Success every time. I even have a couple of old family recipes that require sifting the powdered sugar. Our family classic cut-out cookie recipe is one of these. It uses powdered sugar instead of granulated and is perfect every time. I think part of it is that powdered sugar has that small addition of cornstarch to keep it from clumping and cornstarch helps the dough texture of very delicate things. No matter how much extra flour get added from rolling and re-rolling the dough the cookies stay tender.

Just made Great Grandma's chocolate cake as a birthday cake for my brother (last year of his 60's). Half the people at the party never tasted a scratch cake, much less one from a 120 year old recipe.
 
2022-03-28 1:51:12 PM  

Sarah Jessica Farker: Did no-one teach you people how to measure butter by volume by displacing water?

Let's say you need a 1/3rd of a cup of butter. Get your one cup measure. Put 2/3rds of a cup of water in it. Put your best guess of the amount of butter you need onto a spoon. Lower the spoon into the water until the butter is submerged.

If the water comes up to the 1 cup mark, you've got it!


I do that when measuring shortening. It also makes it easy to remove all the shortening whn it is time to add it to the recipe.
 
2022-03-28 1:51:51 PM  

squegeebooo: One great use for a thermometer, is if it's your first time or two doing a recipe (or if you screwed up a step to adjust oven temp), knowing the correct range of temps for a bake to be done can be great


I proof my dough with my ......ANOVA STEAM OVEN.

https://www.amazon.com/Anova-Combination-Countertop-Convection-Professional/dp/B09BDNHJ39

It can get down and hold a temp of 98 degrees with high humidity for hours....consistently. Which is perfect for proofing bread. Soon I'll have a crop of dill to use to make dill bread. And I'll be making a dill dough, I'll mix it up, and warm it up...and then let my dill dough rise up and form it into a comfortable shape that will fit in my oven.
IT's really nice to have a device that warms your dill dough well before you brown it.
 
2022-03-28 1:55:11 PM  

animal color: optikeye: It's bull shait.

Unless you have a commercial kitchen and use consistently sourced ingrediencies.

Okay. How much does a cup of flour weight?

125 grams.


My sources say 142 grams for All-Purpose flour. (Cake flour 113g, whole wheat flour 156g)

America's Test Kitchen has a handy volume-to-mass conversion chart.
 
2022-03-28 1:57:43 PM  

optikeye: squegeebooo: One great use for a thermometer, is if it's your first time or two doing a recipe (or if you screwed up a step to adjust oven temp), knowing the correct range of temps for a bake to be done can be great

I proof my dough with my ......ANOVA STEAM OVEN.

https://www.amazon.com/Anova-Combination-Countertop-Convection-Professional/dp/B09BDNHJ39

It can get down and hold a temp of 98 degrees with high humidity for hours....consistently. Which is perfect for proofing bread. Soon I'll have a crop of dill to use to make dill bread. And I'll be making a dill dough, I'll mix it up, and warm it up...and then let my dill dough rise up and form it into a comfortable shape that will fit in my oven.
IT's really nice to have a device that warms your dill dough well before you brown it.


Thankfully my oven has a proof setting, so I don't need yet another tool that will take up space, annoying my wife, I'm unsure how knowing the temperature during proofing helps for the actual bake time/temp, but you do you.
 
2022-03-28 2:05:06 PM  

squegeebooo: I'm unsure how knowing the temperature during proofing helps for the actual bake time/temp


I don't think that was the point.  They were just noting that it could hold a low temp accurately for hours, that's all.  Basically what your proofing setting does (presumably without the humidity control).
 
2022-03-28 2:07:08 PM  
I do find that my scales are really helpful for baking, especially when scaling recipes.  It's just the two of us here now, and one of us eats mostly gluten-free, so I end up doing a lot of fractional recipes.  I don't care whether it's kg/g or l/ml, it's easier to scale than imperial measures.
 
2022-03-28 2:07:40 PM  

catmandu: Even there it depends on what you are baking. I use a scale for new recipes but the ones I have that have been handed down through the family get measured BUT I use my sifter to make sure that I don't put too much flour in since great grannie on down also always sifted their dry ingredients. Sifting also helps to distribute the powdered leavening/salt/cocoa/etc. before mixing with the wet ingredients. Sift the flour, measure out desired amount, sift again with additional dry ingredients. Success every time. I even have a couple of old family recipes that require sifting the powdered sugar. Our family classic cut-out cookie recipe is one of these. It uses powdered sugar instead of granulated and is perfect every time. I think part of it is that powdered sugar has that small addition of cornstarch to keep it from clumping and cornstarch helps the dough texture of very delicate things. No matter how much extra flour get added from rolling and re-rolling the dough the cookies stay tender.

Just made Great Grandma's chocolate cake as a birthday cake for my brother (last year of his 60's). Half the people at the party never tasted a scratch cake, much less one from a 120 year old recipe.


Sifting powdered sugar for sugar-cookie dough? I need to know more about this kind of sorcery!
 
2022-03-28 2:09:23 PM  
I'm glad I use a scales when I bake bread. Cakes, cookies, and pie crusts aren't as finicky so volume measurement is fine.

I don't know why bread is so finicky, but you can look at a loaf and diagnose what went wrong. And there seem to be dozens of things that can go wrong.
 
2022-03-28 2:13:01 PM  

Psychopusher: To be fair, you should be measuring by weight.  Powders can settle, especially sifted flour, liquid volumes change with temperature, square cubes of butter are impossible to measure by volume, and so on.  Measuring by weight assures you always have precisely the correct amount of whatever it is you're making regardless of any other conditions.  That goes for any type of cooking, not just baking, but it's less important with regular cooking when you're just measuring spoons of spices and such -- you have a lot more leeway there.  Baking requires more precision.


If the recipe uses teaspoons / tablespoons / cups how much do I weigh out?

/now I need a database of all the ingredients with conversions from tea/table/cup to weight
 
2022-03-28 2:16:15 PM  

petec: Psychopusher: To be fair, you should be measuring by weight.  Powders can settle, especially sifted flour, liquid volumes change with temperature, square cubes of butter are impossible to measure by volume, and so on.  Measuring by weight assures you always have precisely the correct amount of whatever it is you're making regardless of any other conditions.  That goes for any type of cooking, not just baking, but it's less important with regular cooking when you're just measuring spoons of spices and such -- you have a lot more leeway there.  Baking requires more precision.

If the recipe uses teaspoons / tablespoons / cups how much do I weigh out?

/now I need a database of all the ingredients with conversions from tea/table/cup to weight


A cup of lead weighs considerably more then flowers.
 
2022-03-28 2:23:11 PM  

optikeye: squegeebooo: One great use for a thermometer, is if it's your first time or two doing a recipe (or if you screwed up a step to adjust oven temp), knowing the correct range of temps for a bake to be done can be great

I proof my dough with my ......ANOVA STEAM OVEN.

https://www.amazon.com/Anova-Combination-Countertop-Convection-Professional/dp/B09BDNHJ39

It can get down and hold a temp of 98 degrees with high humidity for hours....consistently. Which is perfect for proofing bread. Soon I'll have a crop of dill to use to make dill bread. And I'll be making a dill dough, I'll mix it up, and warm it up...and then let my dill dough rise up and form it into a comfortable shape that will fit in my oven.
IT's really nice to have a device that warms your dill dough well before you brown it.


hmmmmm, well i live in SW florida. so let's see, invest in a $600 tabletop appliance, OR cover my proofing bin and stick it out on the lanai?

decisions, DECISIONS!

-also even perfectly weighing flour by the gram doesn't always account for your local ambient humidity making your flour HEAVIER some days than others. i sometimes find i weigh everything, then still need to add more flour.

and everyone should have an actual oven thermometer if they wanna bake often. the "temp setting" on your standard kitchen oven is likely not very accurate.

BUT then again, humans were mixing and cooking dough before kitchens scales were invented, and the heating it with wood, coal, or even dung fires!

THIS is why "baking" is a dark art compared to "cooking"!
 
2022-03-28 2:23:47 PM  

petec: /now I need a database of all the ingredients with conversions from tea/table/cup to weight


i.pinimg.comView Full Size


But also...
https://pastrieslikeapro.com/2017/04/frustrating-facts-measuring-flour/
 
2022-03-28 2:26:15 PM  

luna1580: hmmmmm, well i live in SW florida. so let's see, invest in a $600 tabletop appliance, OR cover my proofing bin and stick it out on the lanai?


yeah...but will it defrost and cook your HUNGRY MAN DINNER...and brown your meat too?
I think not.
 
2022-03-28 2:30:52 PM  

optikeye: luna1580: hmmmmm, well i live in SW florida. so let's see, invest in a $600 tabletop appliance, OR cover my proofing bin and stick it out on the lanai?

yeah...but will it defrost and cook your HUNGRY MAN DINNER...and brown your meat too?
I think not.


uhmmmm, you know me too well to think that joke will resonate. pshaw, ME? eating TV dinners? 😂
 
2022-03-28 2:31:20 PM  

Sarah Jessica Farker: Did no-one teach you people how to measure butter by volume by displacing water?

Let's say you need a 1/3rd of a cup of butter. Get your one cup measure. Put 2/3rds of a cup of water in it. Put your best guess of the amount of butter you need onto a spoon. Lower the spoon into the water until the butter is submerged.

If the water comes up to the 1 cup mark, you've got it!


This is a far more effective and concise argument for buying a scale.
 
2022-03-28 2:37:20 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Not to mention are publications centered around a specific topic not supposed to offer product reviews?


How is this a product review?
 
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