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    More: Unlikely, Kefir, Alcoholic beverage, Drink, fermented dairy beverage, Nutrition, Fermentation, Probiotic, Yoghurt  
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1295 clicks; posted to STEM » on 20 Mar 2022 at 10:36 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-03-20 11:30:47 AM  
Oh, I see. The subject of the article was the best drink to improve memory. No wonder I found no mention of tequila.
 
2022-03-20 11:31:40 AM  
The dairy industry is gonna milk this for all it's worth.
 
2022-03-20 11:32:20 AM  
live and active kefir cultures

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2022-03-20 11:56:26 AM  

KRSESQ: Oh, I see. The subject of the article was the best drink to improve memory. No wonder I found no mention of tequila.


I say go for the best of both worlds. Use Tequila to wash down a probiotic capsule.
 
2022-03-20 12:27:14 PM  
Oh, FFS. Here's where folks discover that Lactobacillus, a popular "probiotic," is also called "a rare pathogen" by Science Direct, too.

A fun fact: the folks selling you probiotics have no idea why they're somehow "healthful" or "better." No, really - ask the folks at Activia, who patented their particular strain and explained that its only perceived benefit was that "transit time" (read "how fast food goes through you") is slightly faster. Quite simply, we think that they might be helpful, but we're not sure how much, or even if they are actually helpful. From the NIH:

A great deal of research has been done on probiotics, but much remains to be learned about whether they're helpful and safe for various health conditions.
Probiotics have shown promise for a variety of health purposes, including prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (including diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile), prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis in premature infants, treatment of infant colic, treatment of periodontal disease, and induction or maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis.
However, in most instances, we still don't know which probiotics are helpful and which are not. We also don't know how much of the probiotic people would have to take or who would be most likely to benefit. Even for the conditions that have been studied the most, researchers are still working toward finding the answers to these questions.


Simply put, no one's really sure - but as you can patent an organism, lots of folks raced to get their own strains in place just so that they could market products made from them (like Activia) and the challenge, now, is trying to monetize that work.
 
2022-03-20 1:02:40 PM  
I tried  Kumis once.

I will never forget how awful kumis is.
 
2022-03-20 1:18:33 PM  
If there's a brain-gut connection like the article stated, and that foods with probiotics improve memory and overall health, then the quickest way to see improvement would be to do a kombucha, kefir, and kimchi juice colon cleanse. I'm pretty sure someone is going to market this and make millions.
 
2022-03-20 1:52:46 PM  
ETNT should be treated as propaganda.
 
2022-03-20 2:18:25 PM  
Objectives: We aimed to determine whether consumption of a fermented dairy beverage containing probiotic microorganisms influences negative mood states, stress, and hippocampal memory performance in healthy adults. Methods: Adults (25-45 yrs, N=26) free of gastrointestinal and mental illness were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Participants completed testing prior to and after 4-week consumption, with a 2-4 week washout between treatments of: (1) 8 oz of a dairy-based fermented beverage containing 25-30 billion colony forming units of live and active kefir cultures or (2) 8 oz isocaloric, non-fermented, 1% low-fat lactose-free dairy-based control beverage. Hippocampal-dependent relational memory was assessed using a spatial reconstruction task. Negative mood states of depression and anxiety were assessed using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-42 (DASS-42). Pooled 24-hour urine samples were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine urinary free-cortisol (UFC) concentrations. Fecal microbiota composition was assessed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Lactobacillus was increased by 235% following fermented dairy consumption compared to the control (p<.01). Furthermore, the fermented dairy beverage improved performance on two metrics of relational memory, misplacement (p=.04) and object-location binding (p=.03). UFC and DASS-42 scores (all p's > .08) were not significantly changed by either arm of the intervention. No correlations were observed between the change in Lactobacillus and memory performance. Conclusions: Fermented dairy consumption increased the presence of certain microorganisms in the gut and improved relational memory in healthy adults. However, the benefits observed for relational memory were not related to changes in Lactobacillus.
Abstract
---

This is how I read that. Correction/additions encouraged:

The experimental group consumed fermented dairy with kefir cultures.
The control group consumed, essentially, a placebo beverage.

Before and after the experiment period, they surveyed to indicate depression/anxiety (DASS-42) and measured cortisol in urine, I _think_ to indicate anxiety. They observed no significant change in this in either group.

They checked what was in everyone's poop. They found that the experimental group had a 235% increase in Lactobacillus relative to the control group.

Participants performed specific tasks designed to assess level of memory function. ("Hippocampal-dependent relational memory was assessed using a spatial reconstruction task.") They observed specific improvements in the experimental group ("Furthermore, the fermented dairy beverage improved performance on two metrics of relational memory, misplacement (p=.04) and object-location binding (p=.03).")

From the mention of "two metrics" there, I infer that the spatial reconstruction task provides multiple metrics.
Doing a little digging, I think the assessment may be the same/similar to what is reference in more detail here. In that context, it mentions using 5 metrics to measure memory function.

They say "No correlations were observed between the change in Lactobacillus and memory performance." Since they observed increase in Lactobacillus in the experimental group, and they purport to observe improvements in the memory performance of the same group (without explicitly mentioning, but implying, that they did not find the same in the control group), I infer that within the experimental group, there was no statistical correlation between the amount of increase in Lactobacillus and the amount of performance in the two mentioned memory metrics. Because of that lack of correlation, they dismiss the increase in Lactobacillus as a contributor to the apparent memory function improvement ("However, the benefits observed for relational memory were not related to changes in Lactobacillus.").

So they conclude three things:
1. Fermented dairy consumption increased the presence of certain microorganisms in the gut
2. Fermented dairy consumption improved relational memory.
3. The increase in Lactobacillus was not responsible for the improved memory.

I think I included everything from the above abstract, and there is no mention of measuring the presence of any microorganisms in the gut. How can they state conclusion 1, then?
Had they done so, it's entirely possible they would have found that the level of increase in any particular organism, or the collective increase in organisms, had no statistical correlation with the improvement in memory function, just as they did with Lactobacillus. Then what? What else was different between the experimental beverage and the control beverage?
 
2022-03-20 4:32:33 PM  
Gut bugs like it when you eat healthy food (high fiber, complex carbs, etc) and don't like it when you eat shiatty food.  Coincidentally, smart people eat healthy food and stupid people eat shiatty food.
 
2022-03-20 6:18:05 PM  

FormlessOne: ETNT should be treated as propaganda.


A guy named Drew found a way to make money off treating news websites as propaganda. He even wrote a book about it!
 
2022-03-20 7:43:53 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: FormlessOne: ETNT should be treated as propaganda.

A guy named Drew found a way to make money off treating news websites as propaganda. He even wrote a book about it!


He's (probably) still not going to sleep with you.
 
2022-03-20 9:06:53 PM  

FormlessOne: Bennie Crabtree: FormlessOne: ETNT should be treated as propaganda.

A guy named Drew found a way to make money off treating news websites as propaganda. He even wrote a book about it!

He's (probably) still not going to sleep with you.


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