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(Guardian)   Your Uber driver is (a) a grad student trying to make ends meet, (b) a musician doing a side gig, or (c) the former finance minister of Afghanistan   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Afghanistan, United States, Washington Post, Khalid Payenda, Pakistan, Taliban, Al-Qaeda, 40-year-old  
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1876 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2022 at 9:45 AM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-03-20 9:47:34 AM  
Nice to see people moving up in the world.
 
2022-03-20 9:50:03 AM  
Your fare is $55,196,345,000 sir.
 
2022-03-20 9:50:21 AM  
I mean... I think I'd rather drive an Uber than be Anything-Minister of Afghanistan.
 
2022-03-20 9:52:07 AM  
I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.
 
2022-03-20 9:53:32 AM  
How about a former information minister?
i.kym-cdn.comView Full Size

There are no Ubers available in your area.  I am not your driver, and that is not an Uber sticker in my window.
 
2022-03-20 9:55:49 AM  
Its his own fault for failing to loot adequately.
 
2022-03-20 9:57:51 AM  
CSB

Four years ago I took an Uber from Dulles Airport into DC and the driver claimed his brother was the finance minister of Afghanistan. It struck me as odd at the time but I've seen weirder things. He certainly spoke knowledgeably about the state of affairs in Central Asia.

I wondered if he was the n'er'do-well  brother before. Who's top dog now, hmmm?

/CSB
 
2022-03-20 10:07:52 AM  
We had a high ranking South Vietnamese general supposedly working as a dishwasher in Montreal back in the late 70's
 
2022-03-20 10:08:44 AM  

Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.


It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that
 
2022-03-20 10:15:37 AM  
That sounds about right.
 
2022-03-20 10:21:33 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that


Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.
 
2022-03-20 10:21:41 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that


Fark user imageView Full Size

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Good news
 
2022-03-20 10:21:54 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that


I know a surgeon from Tokyo that came to America and pursued the same degree / surgical specialty then moved back to Tokyo to earn about double what he had been earning prior.
 
2022-03-20 10:22:28 AM  

awruk!: DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that

Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.


The loss of human potential is mindboggling.
 
2022-03-20 10:32:16 AM  
thealgorerhythm:

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I was looking at their fee schedule, put the price at $2,800~ so far for all the regular costs. Tack on another $385 for outside the US testing. Not as big as a college degree I admit, but still very large costs for what is supposed to be from foreign trained doctors who probably aren't paid as much as American doctors.
 
2022-03-20 10:33:46 AM  
No, I'm not interested in getting in on a ground floor coup that will restore democracy to Afghanistan.  I fell for that one back in the oughts.  Oh? This time it'll work?
 
2022-03-20 10:37:17 AM  
How good a finance minister could he have been if he couldn't skim hundreds of millions from one of the world's most crooked regimes
 
2022-03-20 10:44:49 AM  

awruk!: DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that

Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.


We lost a specialist in some field in medicine where their were maybe 5 or 6 in that area a few years ago in Quebec,because of the requirement that she pass exams Year after she set up a practice in the province, she basically told the governing board that as she had a busy practice up and running, she didn't have the time to study for and sit for more bullshiat exams just because that's what they do in NA. Our loss.
 
2022-03-20 10:46:47 AM  

Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.


I know a gal who was a dentist in Turkey. She's a US citizen now and after starting over, she's a nurse in LA.
 
2022-03-20 10:49:41 AM  

LimpDickRicky: awruk!: DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that

Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.

We lost a specialist in some field in medicine where their were maybe 5 or 6 in that area a few years ago in Quebec,because of the requirement that she pass exams Year after she set up a practice in the province, she basically told the governing board that as she had a busy practice up and running, she didn't have the time to study for and sit for more bullshiat exams just because that's what they do in NA. Our loss.


My dentist and her husband are both immigrants into the U.S. He was a doctor back home but didn't want to do the hamster wheel to recert. Now he's a long distance truck driver.
 
2022-03-20 10:55:03 AM  
I doubt he's making money especially with the gas prices now. Chasing those bonuses in the rideshare industry is torture. If you've ever been a rideshare driver, you know how sometimes, the "algorithm" becomes weird and just won't give you passengers when you're about to meet your quota for the bonus, effectively screwing you over. Then of course what the rideshare companies don't tell you about are the costs of actually being an independent rideshare driver. You might think making $100 or more a day is awesome, but you have to also take into account the cost of not just gas you need every day, but also maintenance, disinfecting your vehicle (especially now with the coronavirus), surprise vehicular problems like needing new wheels because you'll be driving more than a hundred miles a day if you want to try and make money, and of course, you're gonna have to deal with passengers who'll try to scam you by reporting you with false accusations just to get a refund, and of course the companies immediately side with them and you actually have to be the one to prove your innocence to a customer service agent who barely speaks English.

I hope that former big time guy would be able to find a proper, decent job where he won't have to torture himself.
 
2022-03-20 10:58:23 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: thealgorerhythm:

Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user image

I was looking at their fee schedule, put the price at $2,800~ so far for all the regular costs. Tack on another $385 for outside the US testing. Not as big as a college degree I admit, but still very large costs for what is supposed to be from foreign trained doctors who probably aren't paid as much as American doctors.


Look if you want your doctor from Bangladesh to have training in the English language, US standards of patient-caregiver relations, or how our hospitals / pharmacies / billing / laws work I'm sure they can just watch a YouTube video.
 
2022-03-20 11:05:36 AM  

LimpDickRicky: awruk!: DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that

Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.

We lost a specialist in some field in medicine where their were maybe 5 or 6 in that area a few years ago in Quebec,because of the requirement that she pass exams Year after she set up a practice in the province, she basically told the governing board that as she had a busy practice up and running, she didn't have the time to study for and sit for more bullshiat exams just because that's what they do in NA. Our loss.


Good for her, at least she could practice her profession. I had a friend who looked at all the exams she'd have to pass to be a doctor in Ontario, said "screw it" and after a short course worked as an ultrasonographer instead.  I had to switch from engineering to bullshiat engineering - i.e. computer programming. Had a couple of people at the company I worked for who had MD degrees from China - they retrained to write a software as well. They were quite good at it too.

The additional BS, and maybe it's specific to Canada, is that even if you are certified by Ontario engineering association, when you want to move to a different province you have to do this all over again.

As I said, it's a loss of human potential because people could be working and contributing to the society faster without all those struggles. And I the doctor or engineer pays more in taxes than the Uber driver.
 
2022-03-20 11:14:14 AM  
Heh, I used to throw luggage with an aspiring minister to the opposition party in Kyrgyzstan. He was in exile for having the audacity to run against the administration. Good guy.
 
2022-03-20 11:22:05 AM  

awruk!: people could be working and contributing to the society


The society yeah, but what do I get out of it?
 
2022-03-20 11:30:29 AM  

awruk!: DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that

Unfortunately Canada is the same. The professional associations (Engineers, doctors, nurses, etc.)  are keeping tight lid on the number of people they are willing to certify in the country. I would challenge any local professional working in their field for a few years to pass the exams that are being assigned. You would need a several months of study full time to review what you had at the university, and in the meantime you have to eat and pay the bills. Some immigrants look at this, then say "fark it" and do something else to survive.


Gate keeping to maintain wages... which means you need to be born into a wealthy family to get into a high paying career.  You can't blame them for it, but we ought to do something about it.  It's a 'free market' kind of thing that isn't just an excuse for predatory labour practices.

Of course, if we have say, too many doctors (there's a laugh), then we need to have some method of enticing them to stay in the country rather than get trained here and immediately bailing to the US.
 
2022-03-20 11:30:31 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.

It's because the United States considers foreign credentials "untrustworthy", mainly because we want to charge them money to get an education they already have to get the "correct credentials". Yay, Capitalism!

/We could charge less money or none at all for a certification/testing procedure to verify immigrants have the skills to perform the jobs they held when in their home country, making sure they didn't bribe officials in their country to be handed a degree and actually didn't carry the required skills, but then Universities would cry a lot over that


For doctors and engineers, it doesn't make much sense, but I'd think a foreign law degree would be pretty useless in the US because of the differences in how different legal systems operate worldwide. You'd legitimately need to almost start from scratch going from the legal system of Afghanistan to that of the US. Even the bar exam differs from state to state.
 
2022-03-20 11:39:12 AM  

Ragin' Asian: I've met ride share and traditional taxi drivers who were doctors, lawyers, etc in their native countries. This is unsurprising.


My father worked in a tire factory (Firestone). One guy was a doctor somewhere else but made tires in the USA.
 
2022-03-20 1:07:43 PM  

LimpDickRicky: We had a high ranking South Vietnamese general supposedly working as a dishwasher in Montreal back in the late 70's


I read a story a few years ago about the King of Spain, and how tired he was of all things royal. He secretly immigrated to Toronto, Canada, where his first job was as a server at Pizza Pizza. Then he worked for the Blue Jays baseball team helping to maintain the Skydome turf. He also occasionally drove a Zamboni for the Maple Leafs. Interesting character, but don't ask him to hurry.
 
2022-03-20 1:19:52 PM  

Cary Granite: LimpDickRicky: We had a high ranking South Vietnamese general supposedly working as a dishwasher in Montreal back in the late 70's

I read a story a few years ago about the King of Spain, and how tired he was of all things royal. He secretly immigrated to Toronto, Canada, where his first job was as a server at Pizza Pizza. Then he worked for the Blue Jays baseball team helping to maintain the Skydome turf. He also occasionally drove a Zamboni for the Maple Leafs. Interesting character, but don't ask him to hurry.


Even though he thought he quit to do other jobs, he'll always be king of Spain.

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2022-03-20 2:01:17 PM  

MythDragon: How about a former information minister?
[i.kym-cdn.com image 600x450]
There are no Ubers available in your area.  I am not your driver, and that is not an Uber sticker in my window.


You bastard, that was my first thought too.
 
2022-03-20 2:10:05 PM  

Tax Boy: Cary Granite: LimpDickRicky: We had a high ranking South Vietnamese general supposedly working as a dishwasher in Montreal back in the late 70's

I read a story a few years ago about the King of Spain, and how tired he was of all things royal. He secretly immigrated to Toronto, Canada, where his first job was as a server at Pizza Pizza. Then he worked for the Blue Jays baseball team helping to maintain the Skydome turf. He also occasionally drove a Zamboni for the Maple Leafs. Interesting character, but don't ask him to hurry.

Even though he thought he quit to do other jobs, he'll always be king of Spain.

[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 284x177]


Canadian pizza is worse than Dominos.
 
2022-03-20 3:19:46 PM  
external-preview.redd.itView Full Size


/He cut the ribon at that convention center...
 
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