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(Ars Technica)   1,800 words on the science of spaghetti. tldr: watch for the curls   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Water, Cooking, Pasta, Starch, Spaghetti, Al dente, Boiling, cooked strand  
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390 clicks; posted to Food » on 16 Mar 2022 at 1:20 PM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-03-16 11:43:22 AM  
How to tell if your spaghetti is done: Try a piece.  If it's the way you like it, it's done.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-03-16 12:16:12 PM  
Here come the bread sticks
 
2022-03-16 12:28:14 PM  
th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2022-03-16 12:28:29 PM  
th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2022-03-16 1:35:29 PM  

kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]


If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.
 
2022-03-16 1:38:04 PM  

Psychopusher: How to tell if your spaghetti is done: Try a piece.  If it's the way you like it, it's done.

[Fark user image 218x218]


Actually, you stop a little early b/c you're supposed to finish it in the sauce so everything gets coated thoroughly. Just like meat or scrambled eggs, you use carry over.
 
2022-03-16 1:38:06 PM  

Oneiros: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.


If you get the stuff that's%100 buck wheat its gluten free as well.
 
2022-03-16 1:39:15 PM  

Oneiros: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.


Japanese noodles don't have the right kind of "starch matrix" to stick to Italian style sauces properly. They are not interchangeable.
 
2022-03-16 1:53:22 PM  

Trocadero: Psychopusher: How to tell if your spaghetti is done: Try a piece.  If it's the way you like it, it's done.

[Fark user image 218x218]

Actually, you stop a little early b/c you're supposed to finish it in the sauce so everything gets coated thoroughly. Just like meat or scrambled eggs, you use carry over.


This is true -- plus you add a ladle or so of the starchy pasta water to the sauce so it all sticks nicely.  But that only applies if you're making your own sauce, which fewer people do than probably should.  (There's literally one jarred sauce I actually like, and it's made by a local small grocery chain.  Everything else is overwrought crap.)

Unfortunately it seems like everyone gets this part wrong, and believes "al dente" is the "authentic Italian" way to eat it, apparently having never learned the second half you're supposed to do after you drain the pasta.  (I mean, if you like it that way then have at it, but around here it seems like every restaurant over the last couple of years have taken to undercooking the pasta because that's the trend.)
 
2022-03-16 1:55:19 PM  

kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]


th.bing.comView Full Size

They work very well.
 
2022-03-16 2:08:08 PM  
i.redd.itView Full Size
 
2022-03-16 3:36:19 PM  
It's simple. Use a timer.
 
151 [OhFark]
2022-03-16 3:46:47 PM  

kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]


I have the opposite problem. I know for a fact I'm cooking a farkton of spaghetti, and plan on having enough for a few bowls of leftovers. Then the spaghetti goblin shows up in the middle of the night and my fridge is pasta lacking.

/Made a pound of linguine on Monday, with some chicken and an improvised Alfredo
//Ate the third and last bowl just a few minutes ago
 
2022-03-16 3:56:36 PM  

Trocadero: Oneiros: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.

Japanese noodles don't have the right kind of "starch matrix" to stick to Italian style sauces properly. They are not interchangeable.


Are you finishing it in the sauce?

I haven't noticed any issues in tomato based sauces or bechamel.

I haven't tried using somen with pesto or carbonara
 
2022-03-16 4:10:37 PM  
Cooking instructions on most packaged dried pastas typically recommend an 8 to 10 minute cooking time, but it's an imprecise method that can result in a great deal of variation in the consistency of the cooked pasta.

Really? Works quite well for me. I like thin spaghetti myself, I bring the water to a boil, add the pasta, then give it exactly 7 minutes, same every time. It never ceases to amaze me how so many people try to over complicate cooking simple dishes.
 
2022-03-16 4:17:09 PM  

ZMugg: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

[th.bing.com image 800x800]
They work very well.


I can also think of other uses for a girth measurement tool.
 
2022-03-16 4:42:05 PM  

Psychopusher: How to tell if your spaghetti is done: Try a piece.  If it's the way you like it, it's done.

[Fark user image 218x218]


Then it would be overdone. You have to allow for the fact that spaghetti keeps cooking after you remove it from the water, so, you want to remove it just before its done.
 
2022-03-16 5:09:38 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Psychopusher: How to tell if your spaghetti is done: Try a piece.  If it's the way you like it, it's done.

[Fark user image 218x218]

Then it would be overdone. You have to allow for the fact that spaghetti keeps cooking after you remove it from the water, so, you want to remove it just before its done.


And then some ER nurse is going to win their monthly "best pub story" pool.
 
2022-03-16 10:30:20 PM  

ZMugg: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

[th.bing.com image 800x800]
They work very well.


Not really a good idea.  Spaghetti comes in many different sizes, from full sized to angel hair.  The weight of pasta that fits into an X sized hole will vary wildly.
 
2022-03-16 11:40:51 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Cooking instructions on most packaged dried pastas typically recommend an 8 to 10 minute cooking time, but it's an imprecise method that can result in a great deal of variation in the consistency of the cooked pasta.

Really? Works quite well for me. I like thin spaghetti myself, I bring the water to a boil, add the pasta, then give it exactly 7 minutes, same every time. It never ceases to amaze me how so many people try to over complicate cooking simple dishes.


Yeah, any decent pasta brand will have accurate times based on the shape/style.

And to double check, just try a piece and you'll know the level of doneness.
 
2022-03-16 11:43:35 PM  

Oneiros: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.


Well they're pretty different, but I do appreciate the bundles. What I don't appreciate is that they usually package them in 3 bundles. Why the odd number?

But for non-bundled portions, a scale is your best friend.
 
2022-03-17 4:02:41 AM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Oneiros: kdawg7736: [th.bing.com image 608x799]

If you're cooking for one, I recommend buying japanese noodles (somen, soba, etc)

You can get it in a sort of box-shaped package, nicely bundled into individual portion sizes.

I admit, it's more expensive than italian style pasta, but if you're just looking for a smaller portion of pasta, it's quite convenient.

Well they're pretty different, but I do appreciate the bundles. What I don't appreciate is that they usually package them in 3 bundles. Why the odd number?

But for non-bundled portions, a scale is your best friend.


3?

Oh, you're probably buying them in a normal grocery store.  Go to an Asian  or international grocery store.  They come in much larger sizes.  And not so overpriced.

I'm currently working my way through a 3lb/15 serving box, and the one in reserve is 4lb/18 servings.  (Different brand, and oddly the bundles look the same size)
 
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