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(CBS News)   NASA's new "NACHOS" instrument could help predict volcanic eruptions, liven the atmosphere with some BEAN DIP   (cbsnews.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Volcano, Carbon dioxide, International Space Station, Earth, Sulfur dioxide, new prototype instrument, Mars, Sulfur  
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201 clicks; posted to STEM » on 23 Feb 2022 at 7:55 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-02-23 8:32:25 AM  
So, fun but scary question.

With all the water we have pulled out of the ground for the past few centuries, how much does the change in downward pressure from that loss allow for increasing the size of magma chambers before they blow?
 
2022-02-23 8:32:42 AM  
Tonga and other countries asked if we could share the data, since they are at risk.  But NASA said "That's our data. Nachos!"
 
2022-02-23 9:01:57 AM  
I hope it can't get jammed!

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2022-02-23 9:11:04 AM  
What about the Geophysical Ultraviolet  Allometric Calorimeter (GUAC)?
 
2022-02-23 9:14:18 AM  

lifeslammer: So, fun but scary question.

With all the water we have pulled out of the ground for the past few centuries, how much does the change in downward pressure from that loss allow for increasing the size of magma chambers before they blow?


It's a local phenomenon.  Pulling water out of a certain area probably affects pressure in areas adjacent, but it almost certainly has no effect in the middle of the largest ocean on Earth, on a completely different tectonic plate.
 
2022-02-23 11:46:35 AM  
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