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(YouTube)   Bake bread in volcanoes, make fermented shark, eat fish jerky with butter, and drink brennevin (burning wine)? Icelandic food is farkin' METAL   (youtube.com) divider line
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206 clicks; posted to Food » on 22 Feb 2022 at 12:35 PM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-02-22 10:51:11 AM  
More info on the shark here:

How Icelandic Fermented Shark Is Made | Regional Eats
Youtube QnjtnzyTNoQ


If you've ever eaten a brie or camembert that has a rind that's started to go a bit off, and has an ammonia component to it, that's what the shark tastes like, times 100 or so.

Since ammonia is a strong base, small amounts of this are great at neutralizing stomach acids, so if you have issues with that, then the shark is your friend.

Of course the resulting halitosis from eating it might turn off your friends, assuming you actually have any.

That's what the Brennivin (Black Death) liquor shots help with.  If you like caraway/licorice flavors, you'll like that, too.
 
2022-02-22 11:00:23 AM  
Eesh.  Hakarl.  Surstromming.  Lutefisk.

My pickled herring in cream sauce or dill is good enough for me.
 
2022-02-22 11:42:13 AM  
James May eats Bull's Penis and Rotten Shark | The F Word With Foxy Games
Youtube -xhfJRdwHnU


/oblig
 
2022-02-22 11:55:44 AM  
When my first wife took a language course in Iceland she saw all of those things for sale, plus a few other "local specialities": sausage made out of foal (I guess it was the horse equivalent of veal), hot dogs made out of stock fish, weird-looking "tuna" she thought might actually be whale meat.

She didn't know whether it was a bad time or a good time to be a vegetarian.   She mostly lived off coffee for the two weeks.
 
2022-02-22 12:09:40 PM  
Of course they always make the new guy go and retrieve the bread from near the volcano.
 
2022-02-22 12:55:19 PM  

The Third Man: plus a few other "local specialities": sausage made out of foal (I guess it was the horse equivalent of veal), hot dogs made out of stock fish


I have had sausage made out of reindeer, but never sausage made out of horse.  Reindeer sausage is delicious.  I'd try horse sausage at least once.  Hot dogs made of fish sound ... weird?

The comments section of the video has some additional info, like that you're supposed to pound the fish jerky with a hammer or soak it in milk before eating it.  It's entirely possible that there are directions on the package.  No one ever reads the directions though.
 
2022-02-22 1:02:06 PM  
It's like an entire nation collectively decided to make their native cuisine as vile as humanely possible without it actually killing you.
 
2022-02-22 1:18:25 PM  

Subtonic: It's like an entire nation collectively decided to make their native cuisine as vile as humanely possible without it actually killing you.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-02-22 1:30:03 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-02-22 2:46:20 PM  
New Scandinavian Cooking has an episode devoted to cooking using Iceland's many volcanoes and geysers. Geothermal sous vide.
New Scandinavian Cooking - Mighty Volcanic Oven
Youtube QSChj3wetKs
 
2022-02-22 3:19:08 PM  

FlashHarry: [James May eats bull penis and fermented shark.mp4]


...OK, I thought they usually took bull parts and made them into dog toys.  ICBW.

Subtonic: It's like an entire nation collectively decided to make their native cuisine as vile as humanely possible without it actually killing you.


People eat all sorts of things when they're hungry enough.  If you have nothing but dead sharks nearby, well, ferment those sharks.  Same thing for haggis, the poor of Scotland had lots of oatmeal and sheep intestines, so they improvised a dish out of those.  There are quite a few puffins in Iceland, but since they eat fish, I'd guess a puffin would taste like extremely concentrated fish.  But apparently they're a delicacy in Iceland according to pickyweedia.  I think I'll skip the "raw puffin heart for breakfast" thing, even if it would be the most brutal of all breakfast ideas I have heard today.
 
2022-02-22 3:42:43 PM  

Subtonic: It's like an entire nation collectively decided to make their native cuisine as vile as humanely possible without it actually killing you.


Their cuisine isn't hakarl and unusual food items. Even in Iceland, those are foods you eat during specific holiday periods as part of tradition. It's usually a small amount and even Icelandic people can find it too much for them to eat. Plus it's a remnant from the early days when farming was near impossible and most people were barely surviving with what they had.

The modern Icelandic cuisine is a little bit limited due to location, but it's not terrible and awful. Plus the other Nordic countries have their own horrors like surstromming, lutfisk, rakfisk, and gamalost.
 
2022-02-22 3:56:33 PM  

eyeq360: New Scandinavian Cooking has an episode devoted to cooking using Iceland's many volcanoes and geysers. Geothermal sous vide.
[YouTube video: New Scandinavian Cooking - Mighty Volcanic Oven]


NSC is second only to Pepin IMHO.
 
2022-02-22 4:21:15 PM  

eyeq360: Subtonic: It's like an entire nation collectively decided to make their native cuisine as vile as humanely possible without it actually killing you.

Their cuisine isn't hakarl and unusual food items. Even in Iceland, those are foods you eat during specific holiday periods as part of tradition. It's usually a small amount and even Icelandic people can find it too much for them to eat. Plus it's a remnant from the early days when farming was near impossible and most people were barely surviving with what they had.

The modern Icelandic cuisine is a little bit limited due to location, but it's not terrible and awful. Plus the other Nordic countries have their own horrors like surstromming, lutfisk, rakfisk, and gamalost.


So it started as a Scandinavian gross out contest.
 
2022-02-22 4:36:52 PM  

Subtonic: So it started as a Scandinavian gross out contest.


Survival. A lot of the Scandinavian diet was based upon preserved meats and whatever plants and grains you could forage or grow during the brief spring and summer. They likely didn't want to eat dried cod soaked in lye or the fermented fish or shark, but they are it since it was the only thing they had and you didn't waste a thing back then.

Once things got better economically and they could afford to buy better food or even build greenhouses to grow food, the survival foods became traditional food that you ate on certain occasions.

I mean, look at the variety of German sausages. Or the French charcuterie with pates and cured meats. Or the world cuisines that serve organs or cheaper cuts of meat. Or sauerkraut and pickled vegetables. They all started as survival food. Stuff you made to preserve meat and vegetables for when food wasn't plentiful. Some of it tasted great like ham and sausage. Some of it tasted horrible like hakarl.
 
2022-02-22 5:28:49 PM  
Icelandic cuisine? The horror...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-02-22 5:58:44 PM  
 
2022-02-22 8:22:43 PM  

AintNoAmoeba: https://satwcomic.com/icelandic-cookbook


The JPEG you posted was super-tiny, so I had to follow the link and read the actual webcomic.  Definitely worth it.  The pickyweedia file for Iceland says, "fruits and vegetables are not generally a component of traditional dishes," but modern transportation should make it so that they could import many fruits and vegetables at a reasonable rate.  Or maybe the Icelanders enjoy hot dogs made out of fish and fermented shark more than they enjoy broccoli and canned pineapple.  *shrug*.
 
2022-02-23 12:48:52 PM  

danceswithcrows: AintNoAmoeba: https://satwcomic.com/icelandic-cookbook

The JPEG you posted was super-tiny, so I had to follow the link and read the actual webcomic.  Definitely worth it.  The pickyweedia file for Iceland says, "fruits and vegetables are not generally a component of traditional dishes," but modern transportation should make it so that they could import many fruits and vegetables at a reasonable rate.  Or maybe the Icelanders enjoy hot dogs made out of fish and fermented shark more than they enjoy broccoli and canned pineapple.  *shrug*.


Icelandic hot dogs are now made from pork and lamb, and are quite delicious.  Not sure where the fish part came from.  There are canned fish products like Fiskbollur which is basically a potato and fish puree that you can slice and fry in butter, which is quite delicious.

Icelandic hotdogs are served in a variety of ways, with the most common being grilled on a flat top or boiled, and then topped with remoulade, potato salad, savory sweet mustard, and crunchy fried onions.   You will also see them spiral wrapped with bacon and deep fried, and served as above.

Geothermal hothouse veggies are much more common now due to abundant nearly free electricity and geothermal heat, too. Tomatoes, cucumbers, and other items that normally wouldn't grow there due to harsh weather conditions, even in summer, can be grown in quantity there.

And as noted above, most of the foods described are only eaten during a winter tribute to the original settlers of Iceland, who had to make due with what they could find and prepare without the benefit of anything other than putrefaction, pickling, or steam-cooking over open vents. Also, NOTHING was wasted.
 
2022-02-23 3:17:31 PM  

markie_farkie: Icelandic hot dogs are now made from pork and lamb, and are quite delicious. Not sure where the fish part came from. There are canned fish products like Fiskbollur which is basically a potato and fish puree that you can slice and fry in butter, which is quite delicious.


Somebody who posted before I did wrote "hot dogs made out of stock fish," which still sounds kind of odd to me.  Potato fish cakes fried in butter do sound tasty.

Geothermal hothouse veggies are much more common now due to abundant nearly free electricity and geothermal heat

That also sounds reasonable.  The lack of vegetables pickyweedia describes could be a sort of cultural hangover from before greenhouses and geothermal energy were everywhere.  Sort of like the way it is in Ireland, where many places serve a side of potatoes with everything, even Chinese food.
 
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