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(Science Daily)   Untrained apes instinctively know how to use basic tools, giving scientists insight into intelligence, Dads everywhere an academic citation to belittle you for handing them a 3/8" wrench instead of the 5/8"   (sciencedaily.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Orangutan, Hominidae, Tool, captive male orangutans, prepared stone core, spontaneous stone tool use, English-language films, Bornean Orangutan  
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304 clicks; posted to STEM » on 17 Feb 2022 at 7:50 AM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-02-17 7:55:15 AM  
Ha! Trick question, there is no 5/8 wrench.  In any toolbox it was lost a long time ago.  Sockets too.
 
2022-02-17 8:04:10 AM  
Yeah, but do untrained apes know where the gawddamn 10mm socket went to this time?

/ Cause I don't.
 
2022-02-17 8:16:11 AM  
Do you Americans still use that silly imperial system?
 
2022-02-17 8:23:13 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size

So close...
 
2022-02-17 8:35:56 AM  
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2022-02-17 8:43:20 AM  
Yes but to they pull the drill trigger twice before using it?
 
2022-02-17 8:45:24 AM  

Gubbo: Do you Americans still use that silly imperial system?


Nope we use SAE and SI. Meaning we have to keep two sets of tools.
 
2022-02-17 8:48:24 AM  

TX_Sarcassim: Gubbo: Do you Americans still use that silly imperial system?

Nope we use SAE and SI. Meaning we have to keep two sets of tools.


Isn't that just another name for imperial?

/no matter how hard I try, I will always think of car driving speeds in mph
//has once led to confusion when I went back home and the signs were it kilometers and the speedo of my rental was miles
 
2022-02-17 9:24:39 AM  
Now see if they know how to use options.
 
2022-02-17 9:29:29 AM  
Hand me a wrench.

    What size?

I don't care, I want to use it as a hammer!
 
2022-02-17 10:07:34 AM  

Gubbo: TX_Sarcassim: Gubbo: Do you Americans still use that silly imperial system?

Nope we use SAE and SI. Meaning we have to keep two sets of tools.

Isn't that just another name for imperial?

/no matter how hard I try, I will always think of car driving speeds in mph
//has once led to confusion when I went back home and the signs were it kilometers and the speedo of my rental was miles


I'll take the Brits seriously when they stop weighing things in stones. And, of course, they shouldn't be allowed to complain if you look at the issue they had with moving to a decimal currency system. A country that had been around for over 1000 years didn't move to the "simpler" system until 1971.

From Good Omens:

"NOTE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND AMERICANS: One shilling = Five Pee. It helps to understand the antique finances of the Witchfinder Army if you know the original British monetary system:

Two farthings = One Ha'penny. Two ha'pennies = One Penny. Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit. Two Thrupences = A Sixpence. Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob. Two Bob = A Florin. One Florin and One Sixpence = Half a Crown. Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note. Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies). One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they thought it was too complicated."
 
2022-02-17 10:13:16 AM  

Priapetic: Ha! Trick question, there is no 5/8 wrench.  In any toolbox it was lost a long time ago.  Sockets too.


If you work with both systems, the best trick is memorizing which metric and imperial sizes are 'close enough' that you can use one if you can't find the other.
 
2022-02-17 10:53:30 AM  
Orangutans are farking awesome I want to work in one of those facilities that helps the orphans.
 
2022-02-17 10:55:06 AM  

Normal_View: ZMugg: [i.pinimg.com image 850x531]
So close...

I give Gary Larsen credit for using the correct "Frankenstein's monster", but he and many others are confused about the 'bolts' in the monster's neck. They are not 'bolts' in the mechanical sense. They are electrodes, and they don't require any special shape, never mind any that match any engineering standard.

This element was not in Mary Shelley's original book. Written for the people of her time (She did not realize the work's profound cultural potential at the time she wrote it, and never anticipated its enduring legacy), she fully expected her readers to understand how the creature would be animated by electricity, without having to have that explained to them, so she did not supply graphic details about that. The harnessing of electricity and its many possible uses was a widespread fascination of her time, and in fact the main inspiration for the book, which is why the original carries the subtitle 'The Modern Prometheus'.

The 'bolts' were added by filmmakers when the story was first adapted for screen, and in earlier depictions there were more of these electrodes, distributed over the creature's body. But for the sake of filmmaking convenience, that got reduced to just two, dramatically placed on either side of the neck. This was probably to make the creature look less human, and make him more easily distinguishable from other human actors in those works. (Which is somewhat ironic, given the deeper themes of the original story.) They're still just electrodes, though.


You make some very good points in your post, but all I could hear was:

🎶 NORMAL VIEW...NORMAL VIEW...NORMAL VIEW...NORMAL VIEWWWWWWWWWWWWW!🎶

apologies
 
2022-02-17 11:25:33 AM  

Normal_View: I am one of the most ardent advocates for ditching these outdated units and systems in favour of a uniform global metric system (SI, SI-compliant, and SI-defined), to the extent that I increasingly insist on using metric exclusively, and refusing to use other measures except in more rustic or romantic contexts.


Same here, although I haven't been able to switch over in all contexts, simply for lack of certain tools.  For example, all of my metalworking is performed in Metric, but all of my woodworking in USC.  Obtaining Metric woodworking paraphernalia is too annoying and expensive for the limited amount of woodwork I actually do.  I'm practically constantly working in metal or 3D printed plastic (and CAD naturally works in Metric anyway).

The US is wrong to stick with USC.  It needs to die.
 
2022-02-17 11:47:03 AM  

Kuroshin: Normal_View: I am one of the most ardent advocates for ditching these outdated units and systems in favour of a uniform global metric system (SI, SI-compliant, and SI-defined), to the extent that I increasingly insist on using metric exclusively, and refusing to use other measures except in more rustic or romantic contexts.

Same here, although I haven't been able to switch over in all contexts, simply for lack of certain tools.  For example, all of my metalworking is performed in Metric, but all of my woodworking in USC.  Obtaining Metric woodworking paraphernalia is too annoying and expensive for the limited amount of woodwork I actually do.  I'm practically constantly working in metal or 3D printed plastic (and CAD naturally works in Metric anyway).

The US is wrong to stick with USC.  It needs to die.


The US, or USC?  Your phrasing is ambiguous.
 
2022-02-17 11:47:26 AM  

Gubbo: Do you Americans still use that silly imperial system?


most 'muricans that rely on tools have full sets of 'murican standard, metric and whitworth. too many things one works on are imported.
 
2022-02-17 12:03:05 PM  

dittybopper: Kuroshin: Normal_View: I am one of the most ardent advocates for ditching these outdated units and systems in favour of a uniform global metric system (SI, SI-compliant, and SI-defined), to the extent that I increasingly insist on using metric exclusively, and refusing to use other measures except in more rustic or romantic contexts.

Same here, although I haven't been able to switch over in all contexts, simply for lack of certain tools.  For example, all of my metalworking is performed in Metric, but all of my woodworking in USC.  Obtaining Metric woodworking paraphernalia is too annoying and expensive for the limited amount of woodwork I actually do.  I'm practically constantly working in metal or 3D printed plastic (and CAD naturally works in Metric anyway).

The US is wrong to stick with USC.  It needs to die.

The US, or USC?  Your phrasing is ambiguous.



Not in English, since the topic of discussion is USC, the context carries it.  It's only ambiguous if you read only the last sentence alone.
 
2022-02-17 12:30:17 PM  
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