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(Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)   Operators of dark web website DeepDotWeb in DeepDotshiat   (post-gazette.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Israeli administrator of DeepDotWeb site, User, Pennsylvania, federal prison, Login, Real Estate, Social Services  
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4399 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2022 at 9:05 AM (20 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



34 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-02-01 7:25:20 AM  
"Dark Web" aka Lawenforcement.com
 
2022-02-01 9:09:35 AM  
DeepDotWeb.com ?
Family Guy - PBS Website
Youtube ottGC9jptng
 
2022-02-01 9:12:41 AM  
"U.S. District Judge Donetta Ambrose on Tuesday imposed a term of 97 months on Tal Prihar, 39."

Defense: "Your evidence is faaaaaaake."
 
2022-02-01 9:18:30 AM  
Referal marketing is the latest crazy on tiktok.  These people were at the forefront of referal marketing for the darkweb.
They probably thought they were safe since they didn't sell any drugs but the money laundering got them.  They should have had a subscription fee and referrals paid by link click.. no need to clean the money.   They would have been busted for something but money laundering is a big one.
 
2022-02-01 9:20:59 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-02-01 9:21:05 AM  
Man, I only hear about these places after they're shut down.  They need to advertise better.
 
2022-02-01 9:21:24 AM  
Wonder how they got caught?
 
2022-02-01 9:22:36 AM  
I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."
 
2022-02-01 9:23:01 AM  
"Turning a blind eye" is not legally defensible, particularly with AML issues.
 
2022-02-01 9:24:40 AM  

I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."


Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."
 
2022-02-01 9:25:10 AM  

Bslim: "Dark Web" aka Lawenforcement.com

"You'll always be guilty, at LawEnforcement.com!"
/ Good luck getting that ear worm out of your heads today
 
2022-02-01 9:37:30 AM  

I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-02-01 9:37:38 AM  
I don't know anything about the dark web, and I don't want to. I know enough to know that I don't belong there. I would get in trouble very quickly, I'm sure.
 
2022-02-01 9:43:43 AM  
Bitcoin for money laundering?  Reminds me of the first heady days of PayPal, as the under the radar, no bank regs or scrutiny method to transfer money.  I guess these guys will be freed and become big names in finance.
 
2022-02-01 9:46:57 AM  
As a certified (or certifiable depending who you ask) ethical white hat hacker, I know a thing or two because I've seen a thing or two.
 
2022-02-01 9:47:03 AM  

Too Pretty For Prison: I don't know anything about the dark web, and I don't want to. I know enough to know that I don't belong there. I would get in trouble very quickly, I'm sure.


when Silk Road was still a thing, I checked it out.

The drugs were more expensive than local and introduced the risk of shipping, and I stayed away from the other content, so it was kind a lame experience.
 
2022-02-01 9:58:36 AM  

Too Pretty For Prison: I don't know anything about the dark web, and I don't want to. I know enough to know that I don't belong there. I would get in trouble very quickly, I'm sure.


Username checks out
 
2022-02-01 10:02:39 AM  

Salmon: Too Pretty For Prison: I don't know anything about the dark web, and I don't want to. I know enough to know that I don't belong there. I would get in trouble very quickly, I'm sure.

when Silk Road was still a thing, I checked it out.

The drugs were more expensive than local and introduced the risk of shipping, and I stayed away from the other content, so it was kind a lame experience.


Did the workers have to pee in a bottle like at Amazon?
 
2022-02-01 10:11:42 AM  

Salmon: Too Pretty For Prison: I don't know anything about the dark web, and I don't want to. I know enough to know that I don't belong there. I would get in trouble very quickly, I'm sure.

when Silk Road was still a thing, I checked it out.

The drugs were more expensive than local and introduced the risk of shipping, and I stayed away from the other content, so it was kind a lame experience.


The nicest thing was good acid when there just wasn't *any* around my area.
 
2022-02-01 10:23:37 AM  

I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."


It's less about believing that "they can't find me" and more "difficult enough to find me that I don't think anyone who could would bother over the things I've been doing".  Obviously these guys did the calculus on that wrong.

I can't remember exactly where, I think it was a student at Harvard, who got caught doing some stupid nonsense like sending threats because he thought he was safe by using Tor.  The problem was that the authorities were able to see all the entrances to Tor w/ respect to the local network and because there were so few for where he was they were able to cross-reference the threat timing with the Tor access and narrow it down to the student in question.  Sort of like the toy example of maybe they "cant find you" directly, but there are other ways to pin you down with enough time/resources.
 
2022-02-01 10:44:05 AM  

New Rising Sun: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

It's less about believing that "they can't find me" and more "difficult enough to find me that I don't think anyone who could would bother over the things I've been doing".  Obviously these guys did the calculus on that wrong.

I can't remember exactly where, I think it was a student at Harvard, who got caught doing some stupid nonsense like sending threats because he thought he was safe by using Tor.  The problem was that the authorities were able to see all the entrances to Tor w/ respect to the local network and because there were so few for where he was they were able to cross-reference the threat timing with the Tor access and narrow it down to the student in question.  Sort of like the toy example of maybe they "cant find you" directly, but there are other ways to pin you down with enough time/resources.


Would a VPN solve that issue?
 
2022-02-01 10:50:55 AM  

New Rising Sun: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

It's less about believing that "they can't find me" and more "difficult enough to find me that I don't think anyone who could would bother over the things I've been doing".  Obviously these guys did the calculus on that wrong.

I can't remember exactly where, I think it was a student at Harvard, who got caught doing some stupid nonsense like sending threats because he thought he was safe by using Tor.  The problem was that the authorities were able to see all the entrances to Tor w/ respect to the local network and because there were so few for where he was they were able to cross-reference the threat timing with the Tor access and narrow it down to the student in question.  Sort of like the toy example of maybe they "cant find you" directly, but there are other ways to pin you down with enough time/resources.


The thing is - this is exactly the sort of problem set that computers are extraordinarily good at, and once you have the code to do it you can do it again and again. And, of course, you can't make any mistakes. One click that sends your request over a different route or puts the wrong cookie in your web browser and you're exposed.
 
2022-02-01 11:12:27 AM  

TiberiusGracchus44: New Rising Sun: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

It's less about believing that "they can't find me" and more "difficult enough to find me that I don't think anyone who could would bother over the things I've been doing".  Obviously these guys did the calculus on that wrong.

I can't remember exactly where, I think it was a student at Harvard, who got caught doing some stupid nonsense like sending threats because he thought he was safe by using Tor.  The problem was that the authorities were able to see all the entrances to Tor w/ respect to the local network and because there were so few for where he was they were able to cross-reference the threat timing with the Tor access and narrow it down to the student in question.  Sort of like the toy example of maybe they "cant find you" directly, but there are other ways to pin you down with enough time/resources.

Would a VPN solve that issue?


Not really in that case. A VPN provides encryption (that's the "P" in VPN), but your local network will still show you connecting to it and communicating with it.  So if the people wanting to track you, or to find someone to track at all, could still see that as odd if your VPN connections correlate to the times that whatever other activity they're investigating occurred.  You also have to consider that VPN providers may keep logs of their network traffic and may be perfectly willing to cooperate with law enforcement.
 
2022-02-01 11:41:58 AM  
frinkiac.comView Full Size
 
2022-02-01 11:44:42 AM  
So, basically they got busted for explaining to people how to access sites on the dark web?

Sounds a little like arresting the guy that wrote the anarchist cookbook.
 
2022-02-01 1:13:54 PM  
Convicted in Pittsburgh?

Seems cruel and unusual :P

/Seriously though, fark them
 
2022-02-01 1:35:44 PM  

wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."


Both claims are true.
 
2022-02-01 2:14:26 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.


Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.
 
2022-02-01 3:14:30 PM  

Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.


Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.
 
2022-02-01 3:46:24 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.

Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.


And those exchanges and blockchains have records of the transactions. It's obfuscating the trail a bit, but all you really need is the hops and endpoints. The payload is useful, but if you can see the trails then you can be screwed. That's how they nail terrorist organizations. They watch which endpoints are communicating and build from there. Once a connection has been established, a warrant can be issued and now everything you do is watched.
 
2022-02-01 4:22:40 PM  

Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.

Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.

And those exchanges and blockchains have records of the transactions. It's obfuscating the trail a bit, but all you really need is the hops and endpoints. The payload is useful, but if you can see the trails then you can be screwed. That's how they nail terrorist organizations. They watch which endpoints are communicating and build from there. Once a connection has been established, a warrant can be issued and now everything you do is watched.


Its just a question of your imagination.

You don't like an exchange? Don't use one.

Still worried about your now anoymous Bitcoin? Buy some gold in a vending machine, etc.
 
2022-02-01 6:29:14 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.

Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.

And those exchanges and blockchains have records of the transactions. It's obfuscating the trail a bit, but all you really need is the hops and endpoints. The payload is useful, but if you can see the trails then you can be screwed. That's how they nail terrorist organizations. They watch which endpoints are communicating and build from there. Once a connection has been established, a warrant can be issued and now everything you do is watched.

Its just a question of your imagination.

You don't like an exchange? Don't use one.

Still worried about your now anoymous Bitcoin? Buy some gold in a vending machine, etc.


Unless everything that is being done is only associated with the wallets and the blockchain can it be anywhere approaching the anonymity of cash. As soon as either you or the person with the other wallet does anything that connects the transactions with the real world, there's a permanent record of an endpoint.
 
2022-02-02 6:10:12 AM  

Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.

Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.

And those exchanges and blockchains have records of the transactions. It's obfuscating the trail a bit, but all you really need is the hops and endpoints. The payload is useful, but if you can see the trails then you can be screwed. That's how they nail terrorist organizations. They watch which endpoints are communicating and build from there. Once a connection has been established, a warrant can be issued and now everything you do is watched.

Its just a question of your imagination.

You don't like an exchange? Don't use one.

Still worried about your now anoymous Bitcoin? Buy some gold in a vending machine, etc.

Unless everything that is being done is only associated with the wallets and the blockchain can it be anywhere approaching the anonymity of cash. As soon as either you or the person with the other wallet does anything that connects the transactions with the real world, there's a permanent record of an endpoint.


That is true, it has to be done at both ends.

I purchased a bit of drugs from Silk Road, if you remember that place. The sellers received their cut through Silk Road, and mixers was involved. Since the dude from Silk Road knew what he was doing, except knowing when to stop, the connection between buyer and seller was secure.

/Just a few grams for my own use back when I was in the rave scene.
//I spend like 30 BTC there in total I think. Funny to think about today. But back then, that wasn't a lot of money.
 
2022-02-02 4:20:36 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: Shakin_Haitian: Ketchuponsteak: wegro: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: I find much humor in the concept of "I'm connected to the internet but you can't find me."

Similar to "Bitcoin is completely untraceable. The blockchain is a permanent record of transactions."

Both claims are true.

Until you try to convert Bitcoin into real money.

Yes, kinda. If you do that, then its traceable, but until that point it is not.

However, consider that there's exchanges where you can exchange one crypto to another crypto. Some cryptos are created to not have such a traceable ledger.

So, you change your anonymous Bitcoin (they are because you haven't spend them), into one that has no ledger. And then you change them back.

There is now no connection between the first Bitcoins and the new Bitcoins.


There can be questions as to the source of your sudden wealth. which will be hard to show, since you have no reciepts etc. But that's beyond the scope of what we were talking about.

And those exchanges and blockchains have records of the transactions. It's obfuscating the trail a bit, but all you really need is the hops and endpoints. The payload is useful, but if you can see the trails then you can be screwed. That's how they nail terrorist organizations. They watch which endpoints are communicating and build from there. Once a connection has been established, a warrant can be issued and now everything you do is watched.

Its just a question of your imagination.

You don't like an exchange? Don't use one.

Still worried about your now anoymous Bitcoin? Buy some gold in a vending machine, etc.

Unless everything that is being done is only associated with the wallets and the blockchain can it be anywhere approaching the anonymity of cash. As soon as either you or the person with the other wallet does anything that connects the transactions with the real world, there's a permanent record of an endpoint.

That is true, it has to be done at both ends.

I purchased a bit of drugs from Silk Road, if you remember that place. The sellers received their cut through Silk Road, and mixers was involved. Since the dude from Silk Road knew what he was doing, except knowing when to stop, the connection between buyer and seller was secure.

/Just a few grams for my own use back when I was in the rave scene.
//I spend like 30 BTC there in total I think. Funny to think about today. But back then, that wasn't a lot of money.


Yeah but you're also a bit player relatively speaking. They're not going to spend the resources to bust you unless you're either very easy to identify or regularly interact with the big guys.

The permanent nature of the blockchain also means once they've busted someone, they know all the wallets that ever interacted with theirs. I don't know about you, but I'd rather not have a permanent public record of my transactions with a drug dealer, who might also be in some more... Unsavory business.
 
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