Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   👍   (bbc.co.uk) divider line
    More: Spiffy, British Sign Language, Commons debate, deaf parents, Sign language, Deaf culture, Ms Cooper, family holiday, British Sign Language Council  
•       •       •

4189 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jan 2022 at 3:35 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



30 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-28 1:41:25 PM  
I had to Google but British sign language is nothing like American sign language and not understandable by each other. Strangely ASL works just fine with French signing according to a few sites. Learned something new today
 
2022-01-28 2:09:19 PM  

eurotrader: I had to Google but British sign language is nothing like American sign language and not understandable by each other. Strangely ASL works just fine with French signing according to a few sites. Learned something new today


Because early creators of ASL were either French or French-trained.  Sign languages are not dependent upon their corresponding spoken languages' grammar and syntax (since the movements required may not allow for the rigidity of spoken grammars), so they can develop completely independently.  Early ASL creators liked the French system of instruction better than the British one and adapted it.
 
2022-01-28 2:20:57 PM  
I have a very very basic understanding of ASL, and as a hearing/speaking individual, i have been curious to what degree the ASL brain thinks or hears syntactically. Do the signs just *have* meaning-like words(see brocas speech area)- or do the signs go through a translation in the brain into words-like how non-native speakers have to use a different neural process, a translation matrix of sorts, to put meaning to the non native language.

And to what degree does this vary in the ASL community?
 
2022-01-28 2:23:06 PM  
Some people who use ASL are non-verbal, not non-hearing. People who use ASL can still read and write the spoken language. Some people are fully deaf, never heard a word, comminucate fully in ASL and written english.

I wonder how their brains work
 
2022-01-28 3:09:14 PM  
Those were the nicest teeth they could find a file photo for.
They swear
 
2022-01-28 3:09:56 PM  

phalamir: eurotrader: I had to Google but British sign language is nothing like American sign language and not understandable by each other. Strangely ASL works just fine with French signing according to a few sites. Learned something new today

Because early creators of ASL were either French or French-trained.  Sign languages are not dependent upon their corresponding spoken languages' grammar and syntax (since the movements required may not allow for the rigidity of spoken grammars), so they can develop completely independently.  Early ASL creators liked the French system of instruction better than the British one and adapted it.


Used ASL in Vermont
 
2022-01-28 3:39:38 PM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-28 3:39:40 PM  
probably you have to have your pinky out or something weird...
 
2022-01-28 3:39:50 PM  

eurotrader: I had to Google but British sign language is nothing like American sign language and not understandable by each other. Strangely ASL works just fine with French signing according to a few sites. Learned something new today


farking Americans. You throw a couple of extra u's in there and all of a sudden you can't understand it?

/I know
//I'm just being silly
///and a little racist.
 
2022-01-28 3:40:31 PM  
Swearing In Sign Language: BULLSHIT
Youtube O-8SMFd1lgQ
 
2022-01-28 3:41:22 PM  
British sign language? You mean the two finger salute? The backwards victory sign.
:)
 
2022-01-28 3:41:32 PM  
How do you sign a Scouse accent?
 
2022-01-28 3:42:01 PM  

Murflette: I have a very very basic understanding of ASL, and as a hearing/speaking individual, i have been curious to what degree the ASL brain thinks or hears syntactically. Do the signs just *have* meaning-like words(see brocas speech area)- or do the signs go through a translation in the brain into words-like how non-native speakers have to use a different neural process, a translation matrix of sorts, to put meaning to the non native language.

And to what degree does this vary in the ASL community?


In my personal experience operating equipment and cranes, eventually hand signals just turn into direct motor movements, without having to really translate. You just knew that it was time to boom out, or lower the ball, etc.
(Coming from a fellow hearing/speaking person, can't comment on otherwise)
 
2022-01-28 3:42:04 PM  

whither_apophis: How do you sign a Scouse accent?


/jerkoffmotion
 
2022-01-28 3:42:46 PM  
British sign language actually faces the other way (away from the audience), just to be contrary to those uncouth colonists...
 
2022-01-28 3:43:00 PM  
the problem with British Sign Language, I feel like they drop their R's and swallow their T's
 
2022-01-28 3:43:29 PM  

FarkingChas: British sign language? You mean the two finger salute? The backwards victory sign.
:)


British sign language profanity?  That's unheard of!
 
2022-01-28 3:49:14 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-28 3:55:16 PM  
I almost took sign language in college, until I found out it did not count as a language credit.  Would have still liked to have learned it, but there is this weird academic prejudice about considering it a separate language, because it doesn't have it's own unique written language.

Although, it has been shown time and again that deaf people process language differently than hearing individuals, and written expressive language does not come naturally to them.  They basically have to learn to read and write as a second language, in order to become literate.  You could and probably should come up with a written language, with it's own unique grammar rules and sentence structures, for sign language using people.
 
2022-01-28 3:58:39 PM  
Does the BSL word for chips mean fries in ASL?
 
2022-01-28 4:01:25 PM  

croesius: You just knew that it was time to boom out, or lower the ball, etc.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-28 4:03:07 PM  

Nirbo: eurotrader: I had to Google but British sign language is nothing like American sign language and not understandable by each other. Strangely ASL works just fine with French signing according to a few sites. Learned something new today

farking Americans. You throw a couple of extra u's in there and all of a sudden you can't understand it?

/I know
//I'm just being silly
///and a little racist.


I do fine with the unnecessary 'U's. It's the random 'R's that throw me off. I live in America, not Americur!
 
2022-01-28 4:15:36 PM  
media0.giphy.comView Full Size

What All of Scottish Sign Language is
 
2022-01-28 4:19:00 PM  
So how do I sign "'ello there poppet! What's the b'oody 'ells all this, then?" Every time I try signing it my accent keeps switching it to "Greetings madam! What seems to be the cause of this hullabaloo?"
 
2022-01-28 4:29:45 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-28 4:58:38 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Even Mickey can sign...
 
2022-01-28 5:20:19 PM  
Does BSL have a bunch of wildly different accents?
 
2022-01-28 6:16:56 PM  
but how do you sign:
Liam Dutton nails pronouncing Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
Youtube fHxO0UdpoxM
?
 
2022-01-28 9:12:12 PM  

croesius: Murflette: I have a very very basic understanding of ASL, and as a hearing/speaking individual, i have been curious to what degree the ASL brain thinks or hears syntactically. Do the signs just *have* meaning-like words(see brocas speech area)- or do the signs go through a translation in the brain into words-like how non-native speakers have to use a different neural process, a translation matrix of sorts, to put meaning to the non native language.

And to what degree does this vary in the ASL community?

In my personal experience operating equipment and cranes, eventually hand signals just turn into direct motor movements, without having to really translate. You just knew that it was time to boom out, or lower the ball, etc.
(Coming from a fellow hearing/speaking person, can't comment on otherwise)


Thats an interesting addition to the conversation, but what about less concrete, metaphorical, even academic concepts? ASL is fully immersive and adaptive.
 
2022-01-28 9:13:02 PM  

winedrinkingman: I almost took sign language in college, until I found out it did not count as a language credit.  Would have still liked to have learned it, but there is this weird academic prejudice about considering it a separate language, because it doesn't have it's own unique written language.

Although, it has been shown time and again that deaf people process language differently than hearing individuals, and written expressive language does not come naturally to them.  They basically have to learn to read and write as a second language, in order to become literate.  You could and probably should come up with a written language, with it's own unique grammar rules and sentence structures, for sign language using people.


This is exactly what im curious about
 
Displayed 30 of 30 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.