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(NASA)   NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter thinks "WAP" stands for Wet Ass Planet   (nasa.gov) divider line
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748 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Jan 2022 at 3:20 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-01-27 2:59:55 PM  
i.redd.itView Full Size
 
2022-01-27 3:31:52 PM  
This would seem to be a significant discovery, and a really good reason to look even more vigorously for signs of previous life on the planet.

If Earth turns out to be typical for the appearance and evolution of life, that's enough time for photosynthesis and complex cells to have evolved.  It's still a billion or so years shy of the time it took for multi-cellular life to evolve on Earth, though.
 
2022-01-27 3:42:44 PM  
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Juc [TotalFark]
2022-01-27 3:43:56 PM  
it'd be funny if it was mainly a water planet once upon a time and then all the water sorta evaporated off of it, bled into space, and left the core behind.

wonder how long until we start dropping asteroids on it and start terraforming that bad boy. hope they drop at least one before I bite it from old age.
 
2022-01-27 4:35:29 PM  
Man as bad as some things are space exploration is farking amazing and hot as hell now.
 
2022-01-27 5:30:20 PM  

Juc: it'd be funny if it was mainly a water planet once upon a time and then all the water sorta evaporated off of it, bled into space, and left the core behind.

wonder how long until we start dropping asteroids on it and start terraforming that bad boy. hope they drop at least one before I bite it from old age.


I'm stealing this from an old thread, but it was explained that if we decided to drop asteroids, even ice balls, they would heat Mars up so much that it would be uninhabitable for a long time
 
Juc [TotalFark]
2022-01-27 5:47:49 PM  

guinsu: Juc: it'd be funny if it was mainly a water planet once upon a time and then all the water sorta evaporated off of it, bled into space, and left the core behind.

wonder how long until we start dropping asteroids on it and start terraforming that bad boy. hope they drop at least one before I bite it from old age.

I'm stealing this from an old thread, but it was explained that if we decided to drop asteroids, even ice balls, they would heat Mars up so much that it would be uninhabitable for a long time


well we want to heat it up a little though right? it's a smidge cold right now.
 
2022-01-27 6:51:40 PM  

Juc: guinsu: Juc: it'd be funny if it was mainly a water planet once upon a time and then all the water sorta evaporated off of it, bled into space, and left the core behind.

wonder how long until we start dropping asteroids on it and start terraforming that bad boy. hope they drop at least one before I bite it from old age.

I'm stealing this from an old thread, but it was explained that if we decided to drop asteroids, even ice balls, they would heat Mars up so much that it would be uninhabitable for a long time

well we want to heat it up a little though right? it's a smidge cold right now.


I never did that math, because I can't, but a poster mentioned magma surface level of heat. Maybe scishow or space time or even Manley can cover the topic someday.
 
2022-01-27 7:23:19 PM  
At some point in the future some asshat will be selling Mars Salt as the new Himalayan Pink.

/ "It's astronomically delicious!"
 
2022-01-27 7:56:10 PM  

guinsu: Juc: guinsu: Juc: it'd be funny if it was mainly a water planet once upon a time and then all the water sorta evaporated off of it, bled into space, and left the core behind.

wonder how long until we start dropping asteroids on it and start terraforming that bad boy. hope they drop at least one before I bite it from old age.

I'm stealing this from an old thread, but it was explained that if we decided to drop asteroids, even ice balls, they would heat Mars up so much that it would be uninhabitable for a long time

well we want to heat it up a little though right? it's a smidge cold right now.

I never did that math, because I can't, but a poster mentioned magma surface level of heat. Maybe scishow or space time or even Manley can cover the topic someday.


I quickly did some math and got only a few hundred gigatons of energy for dropping a meter ocean's worth of water from the edge of the gravity well. This neglects kinetic energy but it's at least feasible in theory that you can slow down the (100% ice in this estimate) rocks so that most of their energy is the relatively unavoidable potential energy you get from just dropping them. So at the very least it's not an insurmountable issue

//assuming my math is right but very likely I may have somehow messed it up
 
2022-01-27 8:02:06 PM  
for reference, "a few hundred gigatons" sounds like an absolute farkload, but it's on a planetary scale. It's somewhere around the order of how much energy the planet gets from sunlight a day. definitely would make it balmy if you did it all at once, but not molten-surface-for-decades hot
 
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