Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   SpaceX to finally get to the Moon, but not how they'd hoped   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Moon, Earth, Solar System, Sun, Orbit, SpaceX rocket, rocket's second stage, Rocket  
•       •       •

847 clicks; posted to STEM » on 26 Jan 2022 at 7:50 AM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



38 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-26 7:55:23 AM  
I'm no astrophysicist, but that seems spectacularly unlikely.

Who am I to question NASA?  I am a man with an uneducated opinion and it's my right as a Murican to say NASA scientists are wrong.  I did my own research.
 
2022-01-26 8:09:58 AM  
Hmmmm... that makes me wonder how far away the Tesla Roadster from the Falcon Heavy demo shot is by now.
 
2022-01-26 8:18:12 AM  

Fubegra: Hmmmm... that makes me wonder how far away the Tesla Roadster from the Falcon Heavy demo shot is by now.


Rapidly approaching L2...
 
2022-01-26 8:37:11 AM  
Get up there and clean that mess up Elon.
 
2022-01-26 8:49:40 AM  

Fubegra: Hmmmm... that makes me wonder how far away the Tesla Roadster from the Falcon Heavy demo shot is by now.


Theres a website for that!
 
2022-01-26 9:03:50 AM  
Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?
 
2022-01-26 9:07:52 AM  

Unsung_Hero: Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?


NASA and India have orbiters right now and the Chinese have their rover poking around on sunny days (which it will be March 4th) on the far side (but too far south to see the impact directly)
 
2022-01-26 9:09:12 AM  

Unsung_Hero: Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?


Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is in a polar orbit, so realtime images are unlikely, but it should eventually have photos of the impact site.
 
2022-01-26 9:21:34 AM  
Lemme guess... it's using the same autopilot technology as Elon's cars?
 
2022-01-26 9:49:56 AM  
I hope this doesn't disturb the moons delicate ecology.
 
2022-01-26 10:17:29 AM  

Destructor: I hope this doesn't disturb the moons delicate ecology.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 10:33:36 AM  
We now go onboard for a live update:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 10:34:23 AM  
FTA: "The exact spot the rocket will hit remains unclear due to the unpredictable effect of sunlight "pushing" on the rocket and "ambiguity in measuring rotation periods" which may slightly alter its orbit."

Thoughts and prayers it doesn't hit anyone living in the vicinity.
 
2022-01-26 10:38:33 AM  

freidog: We now go onboard for a live update:
[Fark user image 320x129]


I would laugh my ass off if NASA started putting mission recreations on their site that were done in KSP.  It'd be a fun PR thing.
 
2022-01-26 10:40:38 AM  
I want it to hit the Chinese rover just for the lulz...
 
2022-01-26 10:43:40 AM  
The exact spot the "rocket" will hit remains unclear due to the unpredictable effect of "sunlight" pushing on the "rocket" and "ambiguity in measuring "rotation" periods which may slightly alter its "orbit".

I can use quotation marks too!
 
2022-01-26 10:52:22 AM  
For those not inclined to read the article -

In 2015, SpaceX launched the Deep Space Climate Observatory on a Falcon 9.  Because of various characteristics of the mission (mass of payload, orbit required, etc.) the second stage did not have enough fuel left to deorbit and reenter, which would have burned it up and is the usual way they're disposed of.

So, rather than leave it cluttering up things in Earth orbit and adding to space junk, they used the last of the fuel to send it out rather than down.  (This was easier than having it reenter, since it was already moving in that direction; it didn't have to 'reverse course'.)

It's been wandering around since then, technically still in orbit around Earth, but a really weird, high orbit, not in a position to really be a danger to anything, spinning and tumbling (which means it constantly presents a different profile to the Sun, so it gets varying amount of push from solar wind and photon pressure.  Tiny effects, but they've been adding up for six or seven years).

And now, we've gotten to the point where its orbit will intersect the Moon in early March.  The various satellites and probes will be watching, so why the hell not take the opportunity to squeeze out one last bit of value by gathering data from the impact?
 
2022-01-26 11:00:13 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: And now, we've gotten to the point where its orbit will intersect the Moon in early March. The various satellites and probes will be watching, so why the hell not take the opportunity to squeeze out one last bit of value by gathering data from the impact?


And besides... the moon has had this coming for a long time.

Next time, we'll send nukes. :-)
 
2022-01-26 1:53:36 PM  

freidog: We now go onboard for a live update:
[Fark user image 320x129]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 2:35:57 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 3:00:54 PM  
Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).
 
2022-01-26 3:08:33 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).


they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 3:11:31 PM  

The Bestest: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).

they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

[spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com image 485x485]


Yup.  CSG-2 tomorrow at 6:11 PM, a Starlink launch on Saturday at 3 PM from SLC-39A at Kennedy, and NROL-87 on Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 11:37 AM from Vandenberg.  (All times EST.)

Busy week.
 
2022-01-26 3:13:41 PM  

The Bestest: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).

they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

[spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com image 485x485]


Also supposed to be a launch of Astra's 'Rocket 3' from SLC-46 at Canaveral sometime in January, but I haven't seen a firm launch time announced yet for this one.  Payload is VLCS Demo 2.
 
2022-01-26 4:20:05 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: The Bestest: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).

they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

[spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com image 485x485]

Yup.  CSG-2 tomorrow at 6:11 PM, a Starlink launch on Saturday at 3 PM from SLC-39A at Kennedy, and NROL-87 on Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 11:37 AM from Vandenberg.  (All times EST.)

Busy week.


3 different pads tho, the next breakthrough trick is 3 from the same pad in a week. Ever forward and all that.
 
2022-01-26 4:42:29 PM  

sno man: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: The Bestest: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).

they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

[spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com image 485x485]

Yup.  CSG-2 tomorrow at 6:11 PM, a Starlink launch on Saturday at 3 PM from SLC-39A at Kennedy, and NROL-87 on Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 11:37 AM from Vandenberg.  (All times EST.)

Busy week.

3 different pads tho, the next breakthrough trick is 3 from the same pad in a week. Ever forward and all that.


something I've been curious about and admittedly don't know the answer to..

is there any particular reason why Kennedy and Canaveral are considered separate facilities?
 
2022-01-26 5:02:24 PM  

The Bestest: sno man: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: The Bestest: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Oh - Falcon 9 launch tomorrow, at 6:11 PM EST, from SLC-40 at Canaveral.  Payload is CSG-2 (COSMO-SkyMed).

they're going for 3 launches over a week, capped off by a sekret NRO launch from Vandy on the 2nd

[spacelaunchnow-prod-east.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com image 485x485]

Yup.  CSG-2 tomorrow at 6:11 PM, a Starlink launch on Saturday at 3 PM from SLC-39A at Kennedy, and NROL-87 on Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 11:37 AM from Vandenberg.  (All times EST.)

Busy week.

3 different pads tho, the next breakthrough trick is 3 from the same pad in a week. Ever forward and all that.

something I've been curious about and admittedly don't know the answer to..

is there any particular reason why Kennedy and Canaveral are considered separate facilities?


Sort of a separation of mission.  "Kennedy Space Center" is for 'Civilian' missions, "Cape Canaveral Space Force Base" is for 'Military' missions.  It used to be all one setup, but I can see how this division makes sense as we get more into the world of commercial and civilian space.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 5:04:25 PM  

The Bestest: is there any particular reason why Kennedy and Canaveral are considered separate facilities?


The whole bit of land is Cape Canaveral, the Banana River separates Kennedy Space Center run by NASA and Cape Canaveral Air Force Base run by the Air Force. Out by the launch pads it pretty much just looks like it's all just the one facility, but there are the two different agencies running their own show on their own pads and LP's 39 and 40 have been leased to SpaceX for their launches on the Kennedy side.
 
2022-01-26 5:07:13 PM  
slight correction... 39 on the Kennedy side and 40 on the CCAFB side.
 
2022-01-26 5:20:38 PM  

Unsung_Hero: Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?


thetriviabuff.comView Full Size


/yes, I know the far side of the moon isn't always dark
 
2022-01-26 5:21:25 PM  

sno man: slight correction... 39 on the Kennedy side and 40 on the CCAFB side.


Well, if we're being pedantic, 39A on the Kennedy side is SpaceX's; 39B is reserved for SLS.  But, yeah, you have the right of it.

I'm wondering where on that diagram SpaceX's new facility for Starship / Super Heavy is going in.  Anyone know?
 
2022-01-26 5:24:34 PM  

FigPucker: Unsung_Hero: Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?

[thetriviabuff.com image 650x342]

/yes, I know the far side of the moon isn't always dark


China has a rover running around on Farside.  It almost certainly won't be able to see the impact directly, but *might* be able to spot a plume of ejecta from the crash site, if we're lucky.

Various space agencies have lunar orbiters in place in polar orbits, so even if none of them are in position to observe the event, we should have eyes looking for the crash site soon thereafter.

Heck, maybe it'll even be picked up by the old Apollo instrumentation packages.
 
2022-01-26 6:09:43 PM  

Unsung_Hero: Not that the results won't wait for study... but do we currently have any imaging capacity for the far side of the Moon?


Yes, if you ask the Chinese nicely.
 
2022-01-26 6:13:03 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: For those not inclined to read the article -

In 2015, SpaceX launched the Deep Space Climate Observatory on a Falcon 9.  Because of various characteristics of the mission (mass of payload, orbit required, etc.) the second stage did not have enough fuel left to deorbit and reenter, which would have burned it up and is the usual way they're disposed of.

So, rather than leave it cluttering up things in Earth orbit and adding to space junk, they used the last of the fuel to send it out rather than down.  (This was easier than having it reenter, since it was already moving in that direction; it didn't have to 'reverse course'.)

It's been wandering around since then, technically still in orbit around Earth, but a really weird, high orbit, not in a position to really be a danger to anything, spinning and tumbling (which means it constantly presents a different profile to the Sun, so it gets varying amount of push from solar wind and photon pressure.  Tiny effects, but they've been adding up for six or seven years).

And now, we've gotten to the point where its orbit will intersect the Moon in early March.  The various satellites and probes will be watching, so why the hell not take the opportunity to squeeze out one last bit of value by gathering data from the impact?


So an out of control rocket is just coincidentally on a path to the moon? I don't buy it. This was clearly planned. The only question is the actual mission.
 
2022-01-26 6:48:24 PM  

KB202: So an out of control rocket is just coincidentally on a path to the moon? I don't buy it. This was clearly planned. The only question is the actual mission.


It's to resupply the Nazi moonbase, obviously.
 
2022-01-26 8:24:45 PM  

Unsung_Hero: KB202: So an out of control rocket is just coincidentally on a path to the moon? I don't buy it. This was clearly planned. The only question is the actual mission.

It's to resupply the Nazi moonbase, obviously.


I saw the documentary about that base. Amazing they only need that small a resupply every 7 years.
 
2022-01-26 11:30:49 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: sno man: slight correction... 39 on the Kennedy side and 40 on the CCAFB side.

Well, if we're being pedantic, 39A on the Kennedy side is SpaceX's; 39B is reserved for SLS.  But, yeah, you have the right of it.

I'm wondering where on that diagram SpaceX's new facility for Starship / Super Heavy is going in.  Anyone know?


From this Teslerati article: https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-florida-starbase-lc-39a-lc-49-launch-pads/


The plot of land NASA deemed LC-49 as recently as 2017 sits about 1 mile (1.6 km) northwest of NASA's LC-39B Space Launch System (SLS) pad and 3 miles (5 km) northwest of LC-39A...
 
2022-01-26 11:48:02 PM  

bingethinker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: sno man: slight correction... 39 on the Kennedy side and 40 on the CCAFB side.

Well, if we're being pedantic, 39A on the Kennedy side is SpaceX's; 39B is reserved for SLS.  But, yeah, you have the right of it.

I'm wondering where on that diagram SpaceX's new facility for Starship / Super Heavy is going in.  Anyone know?

From this Teslerati article: https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-florida-starbase-lc-39a-lc-49-launch-pads/


The plot of land NASA deemed LC-49 as recently as 2017 sits about 1 mile (1.6 km) northwest of NASA's LC-39B Space Launch System (SLS) pad and 3 miles (5 km) northwest of LC-39A...


Cool!  Thank you for the information!
 
Displayed 38 of 38 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.