Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   Some manufacturers have less than 5 days' supply of computer chips. Commerce Department warns they don't know what they'll do if the hungry computers try to break free and feed   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Wafer, United States, national security, median supply of chips, economic security, Semiconductor, Biden administration, Semiconductor device fabrication  
•       •       •

510 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jan 2022 at 11:46 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-25 6:44:42 PM  
Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.
 
2022-01-25 7:42:03 PM  
Starting to really feel it in IT infrastructure, some servers I'd ordered in August are still not shipped, others ordered in June only shipped in November.
 
2022-01-25 8:06:51 PM  
Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.
 
2022-01-25 8:53:18 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Starting to really feel it in IT infrastructure, some servers I'd ordered in August are still not shipped, others ordered in June only shipped in November.


We found out a couple month ago we needed to order 10+ new servers for a fairly critical project (mandated by new regulations). Good times.

I started out in the public sector, and we generally tried to keep enough spare capacity to absorb surprises like that. Private sector now, and the just-in-time mentality is biting us, hard. But hey, I'm sure missing all those deadlines in the regulations isn't a big deal, right?

/Glad I'm a contractor, all that shiat is someone else's problem.
 
2022-01-25 8:57:50 PM  

cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.


I have a client that's upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10.  They put it off as long as they could and now their cybersecurity teams are forcing it.  They started ordering hardware back in October.  They expect to have their first shipment in a few weeks.

Much of the existing hardware can't run 10 but they're going to repurpose what they can.

/Wait till 11 comes around and gets forced.  That will be worse.
 
2022-01-25 9:01:00 PM  
I want a PS5
 
2022-01-25 9:23:44 PM  

TheCheese: Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.


It was all the rage 10-15 months ago which is why we have this mess.

We can stay open here as much as we want but if our supplier countries lock down, there's nothing we can do about it.
 
2022-01-25 9:44:26 PM  
Seriously. What workplace programs really need new computers now? Word processors.

The only ones I can think of are specialized image processing, medical, and SOME workgroup 'chat' type things.
And even then...people seem to do just farken fine with facetime, and all the video chat we see every day using last years computers.

Is it a "MY COMPUTER IS SLOW" thing I NEED a faster COMPUTER...well remove candy crush, and all that other crap that tagged along when you downloaded on it for the Xmas screensaver.
 
2022-01-25 10:09:11 PM  

optikeye: Seriously. What workplace programs really need new computers now? Word processors.

The only ones I can think of are specialized image processing, medical, and SOME workgroup 'chat' type things.
And even then...people seem to do just farken fine with facetime, and all the video chat we see every day using last years computers.

Is it a "MY COMPUTER IS SLOW" thing I NEED a faster COMPUTER...well remove candy crush, and all that other crap that tagged along when you downloaded on it for the Xmas screensaver.


An example is not the desktop but the servers, I'm looking at life cycling servers that are 48 cores each (2x24), these days I can get 128 cores in the same form factor for about the same price via AMD Epycs but my god its hard to source them from the various OEMs. Why thought?  Warranties eventually expires but most important its compute/physical rack unit and that march drums on, pandemic or not.
 
2022-01-25 10:19:10 PM  

TheCheese: Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.


Companies that adopted Toyota's JIT inventory forgot about one critical part: identifying which supplies/parts have more lag time, so you should keep extra on hand.  You need to know how easily/quickly your supplier can send you 10,000 widgets, how critical those are to your operations, and whether you can source those widgets elsewhere. Obviously that doesn't help as much when the pandemic is entering a third year, but it can help cushion things.
 
2022-01-25 10:19:45 PM  
5 days? In the before times, this would be a wasteful amount of stock to keep on hand and might negatively impact the quarter end numbers
 
2022-01-25 11:22:04 PM  
Nerd fight!
 
2022-01-26 12:01:52 AM  

optikeye: Seriously. What workplace programs really need new computers now? Word processors.


Most major companies have a refresh cycle for desktop pcs and servers of 3-5 years.  This is to keep the parts under warranty.  So they get new stuff weather they absolutely need them or not.
 
2022-01-26 12:16:15 AM  
Just feed them the warehouses of IoT crap.
 
2022-01-26 12:38:31 AM  

ryebread: BumpInTheNight: Starting to really feel it in IT infrastructure, some servers I'd ordered in August are still not shipped, others ordered in June only shipped in November.

We found out a couple month ago we needed to order 10+ new servers for a fairly critical project (mandated by new regulations). Good times.

I started out in the public sector, and we generally tried to keep enough spare capacity to absorb surprises like that. Private sector now, and the just-in-time mentality is biting us, hard. But hey, I'm sure missing all those deadlines in the regulations isn't a big deal, right?

/Glad I'm a contractor, all that shiat is someone else's problem.


Yes, keeping my Cyrix/IBM dx4 has paid off...
 
2022-01-26 1:19:17 AM  

enry: cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.

I have a client that's upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10.  They put it off as long as they could and now their cybersecurity teams are forcing it.  They started ordering hardware back in October.  They expect to have their first shipment in a few weeks.

Much of the existing hardware can't run 10 but they're going to repurpose what they can.

/Wait till 11 comes around and gets forced.  That will be worse.


How do you get any productive work done in 2022 with a computer that is too shiatty to run Windows 10?
 
2022-01-26 1:26:50 AM  
Dear, Lord is This the Universe Kevin James is President and Adam Sandler is our Salvation!? I want out Damnit I want out!


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 1:34:34 AM  
The shortage can be stressful, so make sure to maintain beneficial outlets like assault & battery of bitcoin miners.
 
2022-01-26 1:40:38 AM  
There is crap load of hoarding going on. Chips and conponents my colleague is trying to order get bought up by the 10,000's, and these are random things like capacitors, regulators, and other low-level things that wouldn't normally impacted.
 
2022-01-26 6:23:50 AM  

optikeye: Seriously. What workplace programs really need new computers now? Word processors.

The only ones I can think of are specialized image processing, medical, and SOME workgroup 'chat' type things.
And even then...people seem to do just farken fine with facetime, and all the video chat we see every day using last years computers.

Is it a "MY COMPUTER IS SLOW" thing I NEED a faster COMPUTER...well remove candy crush, and all that other crap that tagged along when you downloaded on it for the Xmas screensaver.


I am sorry Peaches, some people do real work.

Is there any online 3D drafting software that is worth a spit?

I have about a dozen Excel macro's I run on a weekly basis.  I can't use the web version Excel for those workbooks.  Granted, it could be done with copy/paste, filters, sorting and VLOOKUP() but it would take 10 times longer and be error prone.

Some of the databases we use were developed 10+ years ago.  If I want to do something the developers didn't think of or couldn't do because I want to pair it with data from a tool that didn't exist back then, then I need to do it on my computer.
 
2022-01-26 6:55:06 AM  
Sounds like a supply chain/management problem.  A lack-of-foresight on management's part problem. An off-shoring-production-to-save-money-what's-the-worst-that-can-happen problem.

/If I farked up that bad, I'd be out the door.
//They'll get a raise.
 
2022-01-26 6:58:19 AM  
I can get you a deal on an RTX 3080 graphics cardboard

0.5 ETH
2 ETH
3.5 ETH


1500 USD

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-26 6:59:54 AM  

optikeye: I want a PS5


I've had one for a year now and you really aren't missing a whole lot so far.   There's maybe 2-3 games that are only on PS5 that are really good at this point.  Everything else is still also available on the PS4.  The controller is pretty cool though when games take advantage of the haptics.
 
2022-01-26 7:00:56 AM  

Mad_Radhu: enry: cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.

I have a client that's upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10.  They put it off as long as they could and now their cybersecurity teams are forcing it.  They started ordering hardware back in October.  They expect to have their first shipment in a few weeks.

Much of the existing hardware can't run 10 but they're going to repurpose what they can.

/Wait till 11 comes around and gets forced.  That will be worse.

How do you get any productive work done in 2022 with a computer that is too shiatty to run Windows 10?


You'd be surprised the kinds of crap some of these clients have.
 
2022-01-26 7:06:26 AM  
Problems that I have no control over are the best problems to have
 
2022-01-26 8:41:23 AM  

cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.


I assume the problem is that if they can coax a customer into installing their shiatty app that can remotely turn the hair dryer on and off, they can sell the data the app collects for triple their profit margin on the hair dryer.

There can't be a legit reason so many apps "require" location permission.
 
2022-01-26 10:19:49 AM  

OccamsWhiskers: cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.

I assume the problem is that if they can coax a customer into installing their shiatty app that can remotely turn the hair dryer on and off, they can sell the data the app collects for triple their profit margin on the hair dryer.

There can't be a legit reason so many apps "require" location permission.


This is an outgrowth of the marketing mindset that thinks "this, but on a computer" can sell more widgets.

Then the MBAs come in and try to figure out how to use the whole carcass. If usage patterns, locations, individual user demographics can be extracted, then you can end up with extracting as much profit from the product as possible.
 
2022-01-26 12:37:53 PM  

kittyhas1000legs: TheCheese: Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.

Companies that adopted Toyota's JIT inventory forgot about one critical part: identifying which supplies/parts have more lag time, so you should keep extra on hand.  You need to know how easily/quickly your supplier can send you 10,000 widgets, how critical those are to your operations, and whether you can source those widgets elsewhere. Obviously that doesn't help as much when the pandemic is entering a third year, but it can help cushion things.


There was a book called "Thunder tribes" (a literal translation of the Japanese term used for biker gangs) describing youth in post-bubble Japan.  One chapter followed two "contractors" for a motorcycle part manufacturing company (well down the zaibatsu chain).  If the order was too small to bother spinning up productions, the "contractors" would "obtain" them, typically riding the motorcycles that contained them into the shop.

There was also a thing on the company internal internet were I work (a relatively big defense company), describing the creation of a "tiger team" to do just this (about 1-2 years after the shortages began).  Yes, we have too much corporatespeak and stupid management doing stupid management things (for example, their idea of retaining employees included "meeting with management").

/not sure if this was due to slow internal operations
//or the religion of "lean manufacturing" at the top
////lean goes out the window at production level if you *know* they are playing "wait and hurry up".  Build now while there is slack.
 
2022-01-26 1:17:37 PM  

OccamsWhiskers: There can't be a legit reason so many apps "require" location permission.


Until Android 12, apps had to request location permission just to scan for Bluetooth devices, which is ostensibly why a lot of apps for smart devices request that.

That isn't to say they aren't doing shady shiat with those permissions too, but until very recently there was a valid reason for it.

No clue how Apple handles things.
 
2022-01-26 1:26:24 PM  

Short Victoria's War: I can get you a deal on an RTX 3080 graphics cardboard

0.5 ETH
2 ETH
3.5 ETH

1500 USD

[Fark user image 850x850]


No water cooling?
 
2022-01-26 4:11:09 PM  

TheCheese: Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.



yep

JIT manufacturing so they could increase profits to their lazy sit at home stock owners who always whine about getting more free goodies this year than last.

everyone else pays the price
 
2022-01-26 4:13:19 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Starting to really feel it in IT infrastructure, some servers I'd ordered in August are still not shipped, others ordered in June only shipped in November.



State Capitalism is the best economic system in the world!!
 
2022-01-26 6:20:04 PM  
I remember 25 years ago when my company went full in on 6Sigma, JIT, Kanban. At the time, I tried to argue that many parts were good, but that many parts didn't fit, and they shouldn't expect that just because a C-level guy read a book on an airplane, and copying what was successful somewhere else without using their brains to evaluate why it was successful somewhere else, it was going to fail. And that then they would abandon the program, and not even keep the parts that worked.
6Sigma is great for critical processes. It is useless when measuring things that do not matter.
JIT is great for a country with high land costs and availability, and an abundance of ports. Your warehouses float, and rotate stock for you.
ISO9000 is great if you have a well engineered product. Every product is identical. Not so much if they all use the same part that fails at the same time.
 
2022-01-26 7:53:54 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Starting to really feel it in IT infrastructure, some servers I'd ordered in August are still not shipped, others ordered in June only shipped in November.


Just boil some water and go to the cloud.
 
2022-01-26 7:54:48 PM  

cherryl taggart: Maybe, just maybe, some items could be made that weren't increasingly upgraded.   My hair dryer doesn't need connectivity.  Nor does the toaster.

'Just because' is not a great reason to rework every single gizmo in the world.


A lot of those chips are all in ones and adding say Bluetooth or Wi-Fi is more of a development cost.
 
2022-01-27 12:43:46 AM  
Maybe shoe horning chips into every stupid little thing where it wasn't necessary was not such a bright idea.
 
2022-01-27 8:44:11 AM  

kittyhas1000legs: TheCheese: Yes, its called "just-in-time" manufacturing, and it was all the rage 10-15 years ago in reducing overhead from huge warehouses full of parts that manufacturers used to have so that temporary parts shortages didn't cause factories to shut down.

Companies that adopted Toyota's JIT inventory forgot about one critical part: identifying which supplies/parts have more lag time, so you should keep extra on hand.  You need to know how easily/quickly your supplier can send you 10,000 widgets, how critical those are to your operations, and whether you can source those widgets elsewhere. Obviously that doesn't help as much when the pandemic is entering a third year, but it can help cushion things.


This, exactly. JIT isn't inherently bad but it does require active management and some stockpiling of parts that may have a longer lead time or be more unpredictable than the rest.

Also it's based on a "normal" industrial output, not 3 years of various compounding pandemic problems, so I'd probably have been leasing warehouse space and stocking up when all this kicked off if i ran a production line or ten. Bleeding edge computer parts are a little harder to hoard than basic automotive sensors and old infotainment systems though.
 
Displayed 37 of 37 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.