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(Some Guy)   You mean to tell me my egg carton is a lying son of a biatch?   (suggest.com) divider line
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1256 clicks; posted to Food » on 24 Jan 2022 at 8:35 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



43 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-01-24 8:23:25 AM  
No, marketers are just smarter than you.

And adding the color "brown" to that list is just stupid. "Brown" on a carton of eggs isn't a lie. It's not misrepresentation. The eggs are brown. And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever. It depends on the breed of chicken that laid them. The only potential issue there is that very often, people make the leap into assuming that brown eggs are somehow "better" for them than white eggs. That's the nonsense, not the fact that the shells have color.

You're often more likely to find brown (or other-colored eggs) at farmers' markets, too, which may help add to the misperception that there's something more "natural" or "healthy" about brown eggs. But that's primarily based on consumer ignorance, not marketing.
 
2022-01-24 8:27:17 AM  
The folksy rugged farmer pictured on the front of my carton begs to differ, subby. If I can't trust him, I can't trust anyone.  Go suck...

...

...dammit, I had something for this.
 
2022-01-24 8:40:56 AM  
The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.
 
2022-01-24 8:53:36 AM  

EnzoTheCoder: The folksy rugged farmer pictured on the front of my carton begs to differ, subby. If I can't trust him, I can't trust anyone.  Go suck...

...

...dammit, I had something for this.


Was it this?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-24 8:55:19 AM  

question_dj: The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.


The shell color doesn't mean a thing when buying from the grocery store. If you want that neon orange thick yolk you're going to have to raise the chickens yourself, or know somebody that does. It's fairly easy, except when they are constantly eaten by racoons, foxes, or coyotes. That shiat will wake you up in the middle of the night.
 
2022-01-24 8:56:42 AM  
I guess I didn't know that "cage free" wasn't as good as I thought it was.
 
2022-01-24 8:57:41 AM  

question_dj: The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.


Yes.  If you need eggs for ingredients for baking, it doesn't matter.  But if I'm making eggs to eat as eggs, I want the ones from the farm stand or that friend who has chickens.  They are so much tastier.  I love opening a carton and seeing green, blue, and brown instead of all white.
 
2022-01-24 9:00:31 AM  
I live next to an egg farm.
I get 12 eggs, and the lady takes them out of the fridge there.
I walk up the lane to my house, and put them in a bowl on the counter.
I don't refrigerate my eggs.
they are in her fridge for maybe a few hours.
 
2022-01-24 9:01:53 AM  

Subtonic: question_dj: The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.

The shell color doesn't mean a thing when buying from the grocery store. If you want that neon orange thick yolk you're going to have to raise the chickens yourself, or know somebody that does. It's fairly easy, except when they are constantly eaten by racoons, foxes, or coyotes. That shiat will wake you up in the middle of the night.


Going on 5-years with chickens that produce the neon orange yolks, that's true.  Hearing the horror stories of predation on chickens from foxes and hawks I've built my chicken kingdom like Fort Knox, including burying underground hardware cloth barriers around the perimeter, and no predation on my chickens so far.
 
2022-01-24 9:02:57 AM  

Pocket Ninja: And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever.


Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs and how soon can I get some?!?!
 
2022-01-24 9:04:49 AM  
question_dj: blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

The biggest input to the taste of the eggs is the diet of the chicken who laid it.  Heritage breeds are more likely to be kept by someone who treats them more like a pet - so the diet is likely to be more rich in things like insects, indoor food scraps, high-quality feed, etc.  Which in turn, will make the eggs taste better, and more eggy.
 
2022-01-24 9:06:10 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs


The Araucana is known as an "easter egg" breed - some people have crossbred them with other varieties to generate other colors.  If you look up easter egg chickens, you'll see all sorts of stuff about it.  Chicken people are weird.
 
2022-01-24 9:06:31 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs and how soon can I get some?!?!


I buy them from my own flock of chickens. We have a pretty effective barter system in place. I feed, protect, and shelter them; they give me eggs. Of the blue, green, white, and brown varieties.
 
2022-01-24 9:06:39 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Pocket Ninja: And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever.

Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs and how soon can I get some?!?!


find someone raising Easter Eggers, they come about as green as this, others shades of light blue, and a few dark olive green
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-24 9:07:57 AM  

Munden: Subtonic: question_dj: The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.

The shell color doesn't mean a thing when buying from the grocery store. If you want that neon orange thick yolk you're going to have to raise the chickens yourself, or know somebody that does. It's fairly easy, except when they are constantly eaten by racoons, foxes, or coyotes. That shiat will wake you up in the middle of the night.

Going on 5-years with chickens that produce the neon orange yolks, that's true.  Hearing the horror stories of predation on chickens from foxes and hawks I've built my chicken kingdom like Fort Knox, including burying underground hardware cloth barriers around the perimeter, and no predation on my chickens so far.


Well, that sounds like a challenge.

*grabs shovel*
 
2022-01-24 9:08:57 AM  
This is the coolest thing ever. I now want to keep chickens and get into the barter system.
 
2022-01-24 9:19:10 AM  

NewportBarGuy: This is the coolest thing ever. I now want to keep chickens and get into the barter system.


If only my town would allow me to keep chickens....
 
2022-01-24 9:19:48 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Pocket Ninja: And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever.

Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs and how soon can I get some?!?!


Arucana chickens lay blue and green eggs.
 
2022-01-24 9:23:14 AM  
You mean not everyone gets their fresh eggs the same place they get their fresh beer?

you can't get much more local, 5 miles from my house

https://www.oldadriancefarm.com/

/their website is not very good
//small farm/brewery/event space run by a family of veterans
///their eggs a very good and their beer is even better
/Vif you have your wedding there, they will brew you your own custom batch of beer for the occasion
 
2022-01-24 10:00:59 AM  
whatscookingamerica.netView Full Size
 
2022-01-24 10:12:51 AM  
On the other hand, the only times I've ever had bad eggs have been when I've purchased them at farm stands.

My last job one of the operators had about two dozen chickens of various breeds.  Rainbows of eggs and they all tasted the same.
 
2022-01-24 10:23:37 AM  
I buy whichever are on sale. I don't care about all that other stuff.
 
2022-01-24 11:00:50 AM  

abhorrent1: I buy whichever are on sale. I don't care about all that other stuff.


Yup, I pay like $1 a dozen and when you go through more than a dozen a day on the weekends I'm not going to care if my egg has a slight different texture to the yolk.
 
2022-01-24 11:03:12 AM  
You mean to tell me my egg carton is a lying son of a biatch?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-24 11:24:12 AM  

Gunner's Mate First Class Phillip Asshole: abhorrent1: I buy whichever are on sale. I don't care about all that other stuff.

Yup, I pay like $1 a dozen and when you go through more than a dozen a day on the weekends I'm not going to care if my egg has a slight different texture to the yolk.


$1? Geez. I bought a dozen last week and the sale price was $2.99, marked down from $3.99. And that was the store brand. The "fancy" eggs were more.

And forget about bacon. Even on sale it's now like $7 a pound. Everything has gotten stupid expensive. Maybe I need to try a different store.
 
2022-01-24 11:39:27 AM  
Labels are marketing, and marketing is lies.

Certifications are real.
 
2022-01-24 11:49:38 AM  

abhorrent1: Gunner's Mate First Class Phillip Asshole: abhorrent1: I buy whichever are on sale. I don't care about all that other stuff.

Yup, I pay like $1 a dozen and when you go through more than a dozen a day on the weekends I'm not going to care if my egg has a slight different texture to the yolk.

$1? Geez. I bought a dozen last week and the sale price was $2.99, marked down from $3.99. And that was the store brand. The "fancy" eggs were more.

And forget about bacon. Even on sale it's now like $7 a pound. Everything has gotten stupid expensive. Maybe I need to try a different store.


At my local store they sell the mediums for $1 a dozen because nobody buys them and they are just barely smaller than large.  So much so that I can almost never tell the difference.  Large eggs at Walmart are like $1.75 a dozen.
 
2022-01-24 11:55:49 AM  

Pocket Ninja: No, marketers are just smarter than you.

And adding the color "brown" to that list is just stupid. "Brown" on a carton of eggs isn't a lie. It's not misrepresentation. The eggs are brown. And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever. It depends on the breed of chicken that laid them. The only potential issue there is that very often, people make the leap into assuming that brown eggs are somehow "better" for them than white eggs. That's the nonsense, not the fact that the shells have color.

You're often more likely to find brown (or other-colored eggs) at farmers' markets, too, which may help add to the misperception that there's something more "natural" or "healthy" about brown eggs. But that's primarily based on consumer ignorance, not marketing.


To be fair, that's because some of us still have this friggin' bullshiat jingle stuck in our head:

"Brown eggs are local eggs and local eggs are fresh!"

If you lived in New England during the '80s, you heard & saw that ad constantly. It's utter bullshiat, but that meme stuck.
 
2022-01-24 12:05:31 PM  
And, a few other reminders:

"Free-range", per USDA, only means that birds must have "outdoor access" or "access to the outdoors."  In some cases, this can mean access only through a "pop hole," with no full-body access to the outdoors and no minimum space requirement. Read "a single 10 inch by 14 inch hole, no matter how big the coop or structure" and voila! You now have "free-range" chickens.

Stick with "organic" and "pasture-raised" whenever possible. If you can get those two words in combination, you're eating an egg produced by a chicken with a reasonable quality of life. Pasture-raised eggs have slightly better nutritional qualities, but, although measurable, they're not significant enough to justify the huge leap in price, IMHO - if you're buying pasture-raised eggs, do it because you want chickens to be treated better, not because you want somehow superior eggs.
 
2022-01-24 12:07:52 PM  

optikeye: [whatscookingamerica.net image 350x260]


As far as I'm concerned, the only useful print on an egg carton. Especially lately, as supply chain difficulties have meant that lots of places are serving up older & expired foodstuffs...
 
2022-01-24 12:14:56 PM  

SomeAmerican: Labels are marketing, and marketing is lies.

Certifications are real.


And not all certifications are real. Because folks started looking for certifications, quite a few "fluff" ones sprang into being - little more than marketing vending machines ("drop in your quarter, get your cert logo"), they're useless.

In particular, fake organic certifications continue to be a problem. Stick with:
USDA Certified Organic
Certified Humane
Animal Welfare Approved
Fair Trade Certified
 
2022-01-24 1:16:28 PM  

Gunner's Mate First Class Phillip Asshole: abhorrent1: Gunner's Mate First Class Phillip Asshole: abhorrent1: I buy whichever are on sale. I don't care about all that other stuff.

Yup, I pay like $1 a dozen and when you go through more than a dozen a day on the weekends I'm not going to care if my egg has a slight different texture to the yolk.

$1? Geez. I bought a dozen last week and the sale price was $2.99, marked down from $3.99. And that was the store brand. The "fancy" eggs were more.

And forget about bacon. Even on sale it's now like $7 a pound. Everything has gotten stupid expensive. Maybe I need to try a different store.

At my local store they sell the mediums for $1 a dozen because nobody buys them and they are just barely smaller than large.  So much so that I can almost never tell the difference.  Large eggs at Walmart are like $1.75 a dozen.


Generic white, large eggs at the grocer where I shop are $1.26 for 18 eggs or $2.50 for 3 dozen.
 
2022-01-24 1:49:31 PM  
there is ONLY one meaningful thing on egg cartons: the pack date-

Fark user imageView Full Size


and it's formatted as the number day of the year. for example, today 1.24.2022 is day 24.

but 7.4.2022 will be day 185. there are simple online calculators for figuring out the current "number day of the year" too, just google it.

THIS will tell you how old the eggs really are, ignore the expiry date.

OH, and if you doubt your eggs, just throw a them raw in a glass of tap water. if any eggs float they are TOO OLD. as washed, american, egg-in-shell age in your fridge the air pocket in them slowly grows. if it's become big enough to float them they have become eggs you should NOT eat, even cooked.

i hope you've enjoyed my TED talk......
 
2022-01-24 1:50:34 PM  

optikeye: [whatscookingamerica.net image 350x260]


annnnd i commented without reading the thread!
 
2022-01-24 2:03:45 PM  

luna1580: there is ONLY one meaningful thing on egg cartons: the pack date-

[Fark user image 350x260]

and it's formatted as the number day of the year. for example, today 1.24.2022 is day 24.

but 7.4.2022 will be day 185. there are simple online calculators for figuring out the current "number day of the year" too, just google it.

THIS will tell you how old the eggs really are, ignore the expiry date.

OH, and if you doubt your eggs, just throw a them raw in a glass of tap water. if any eggs float they are TOO OLD. as washed, american, egg-in-shell age in your fridge the air pocket in them slowly grows. if it's become big enough to float them they have become eggs you should NOT eat, even cooked.

i hope you've enjoyed my TED talk......


I've used the floating test for some time now. Can't remember where I learned it.
Also, If you give your eggs a coat of mineral oil, it re-seals the washed shells and can extend their life by months.
 
2022-01-24 2:23:10 PM  
Yeah, I always have assumed the majority of anything on the cartons was "weasel words".  This is one of those things that I just eat so many eggs that I can't be bothered any more.  I used to, though.

Amazon grocery' brand eggs are what I buy.  couple 18 packs at a time.
 
2022-01-24 3:16:09 PM  

Munden: NewportBarGuy: Pocket Ninja: And some eggs are green, or blue, or white, or whatever.

Where in the f*ck are you buying your eggs and how soon can I get some?!?!

find someone raising Easter Eggers, they come about as green as this, others shades of light blue, and a few dark olive green
[Fark user image 605x294]


This.  And those Easter Eggs are preferred for baking, they allegedly make cakes fluffier

I buy eggs from a friend that has chickens.  Farm fresh has a real meaning to me ;-)
 
2022-01-24 4:29:26 PM  

Subtonic: question_dj: The color of the egg plays a role in the color and density of the yolk. I have never once seen a white egg produce a totally orange and thick yolk. White egg yolks are yellow and not as richly flavored as brown eggs. And blue heritage eggs have the most eggy flavor of all the egg colors.

Caged, generic chickens, produce white eggs that have zero flavor and pathetic yolk.

The shell color doesn't mean a thing when buying from the grocery store. If you want that neon orange thick yolk you're going to have to raise the chickens yourself, or know somebody that does. It's fairly easy, except when they are constantly eaten by racoons, foxes, or coyotes. That shiat will wake you up in the middle of the night.


Yep. Good feed and exercised chickens make far better quality eggs.
 
2022-01-24 4:34:44 PM  
There's actually a good reason that brown eggs are more expensive than white eggs. It is because the breeds that produce brown eggs consume more feed to produce the same amount of eggs, so the brown eggs are more expensive to produce.
 
2022-01-24 6:08:24 PM  
I'll pay more for eggs from pasture raised chickens but I'm not feeding a household and I don't eat them every day.
 
2022-01-24 7:58:17 PM  
FTA: "Cage-free" doesn't mean what you think, either. Yes, the birds that laid the eggs weren't kept in cages. But, that doesn't mean those chickens lived on an idyllic farm in the countryside. The egg-laying chickens often don't go outside and are raised in cramped, over-populated, and disgusting conditions."

What a dumbass. Most farmers don't like on an "idyllic farm in the countryside." Fark me. Anything is literally better than living your entire life in a farkin' cage. I buy either cage free or free range. But chickens do not need the Hilton, dumbass. They're still just chickens. With the amount of animal abuse, e.g. puppy mills, that takes place in this country, can't believe the shiatstorm this topic kicked up.
 
2022-01-24 11:07:10 PM  
pics.me.meView Full Size
 
2022-01-25 1:50:09 PM  
I've also seen vegan fed. So they are only fed corn and don't get any bugs like pasture raised?
I need to find local white eggs- I do some pysanka and the bleach wash on store- bought eggs really weakens the shell.
FYI duck eggs are great for baking
 
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