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(Live Science)   My god, it's full of black holes   (livescience.com) divider line
    More: Scary, General relativity, black holes, Galaxy, Black hole, number of stellar-mass black holes, Universe, Dark matter, evolution of stars  
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1784 clicks; posted to STEM » on 23 Jan 2022 at 12:02 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-01-23 12:34:51 PM  
An astronomical number?
 
2022-01-23 12:47:45 PM  
But enough about your Mom...
 
2022-01-23 12:48:06 PM  
To contemplate these numbers is to know you are nothing.

No wonder people run from science.
 
2022-01-23 12:53:14 PM  
Black holes, they never get shiny.  The longer you feed them the blacker they get.
 
2022-01-23 1:11:29 PM  
40,000,000,000,000,000,000? Pssh. That's it?
 
2022-01-23 1:12:38 PM  

thehellisthis: Black holes, they never get shiny.  The longer you feed them the blacker they get.


They're hard to find, for a number of reasons. Holly addresses at least one of those reasons...
Red Dwarf - Black Holes
Youtube SqI41N4WGPM
 
2022-01-23 1:13:22 PM  

edmo: To contemplate these numbers is to know you are nothing.

No wonder people run from science.


Not everyone can be Zaphod Beeblebrox.
 
2022-01-23 1:14:28 PM  
So how much "dark matter" are we talking about?  Or is it simply impossible to have a large amount of stable systems that aren't sucking in enough material to make x-rays?

Because if the Sun were to suddenly turn into a black hole (I'm not suggesting that this is how it happens, just pointing out that a black hole doesn't change the total amount of gravity attracting the surrounding mass.  If anything, the process to get that way likely reduces it), the planets would keep orbiting the way they have for billions of years (with a small change due to the lack of a solar wind).  Any comet that would have crashed into the old Sun would have a chance to get sucked in, but more likely it would be sent way out on a hyperbolic trajectory.

Yes, the whole idea of this being  the source of dark matter is certainly nightmare fuel.  Curious how many Sun-sized stars would have to turn into black holes before we would see it happen.
 
2022-01-23 2:02:00 PM  

thehellisthis: Black holes, they never get shiny.  The longer you feed them the blacker they get.


Starve them long enough and they get very shiny.  Very, very shiny for a very short period of time.

yet_another_wumpus: Because if the Sun were to suddenly turn into a black hole (I'm not suggesting that this is how it happens, just pointing out that a black hole doesn't change the total amount of gravity attracting the surrounding mass. If anything, the process to get that way likely reduces it), the planets would keep orbiting the way they have for billions of years (with a small change due to the lack of a solar wind). Any comet that would have crashed into the old Sun would have a chance to get sucked in, but more likely it would be sent way out on a hyperbolic trajectory.


I don't think the planets would continue to peacefully orbit.  Unless someone has an Acme black hole generator the creation of the black hole will be too cataclysmic.
 
2022-01-23 2:05:33 PM  
1% of the universe is black holes? It's a start.
 
2022-01-23 2:16:02 PM  

Loren: thehellisthis: Black holes, they never get shiny.  The longer you feed them the blacker they get.

Starve them long enough and they get very shiny.  Very, very shiny for a very short period of time.

yet_another_wumpus: Because if the Sun were to suddenly turn into a black hole (I'm not suggesting that this is how it happens, just pointing out that a black hole doesn't change the total amount of gravity attracting the surrounding mass. If anything, the process to get that way likely reduces it), the planets would keep orbiting the way they have for billions of years (with a small change due to the lack of a solar wind). Any comet that would have crashed into the old Sun would have a chance to get sucked in, but more likely it would be sent way out on a hyperbolic trajectory.

I don't think the planets would continue to peacefully orbit.  Unless someone has an Acme black hole generator the creation of the black hole will be too cataclysmic.


I think the explosion would leave our sun as no longer a point mass for at least long enough for the BH to reform, and our orbit would stop being stable.
 
2022-01-23 2:29:32 PM  
Calling black holes "matter" is a little farked up. the subheading would be unreadable, but it's more ilke "1% of the curvatures of spacetime can be attributed to black holes that have not been located."

And also that would throw a significant change into the analysis of dark matter. In some regions it would probably change not just distribution but amount thereof. So, this is an interesting hypothesis.
 
2022-01-23 3:03:39 PM  
Just civilizations hiding in the dark forest. Harmless.
 
2022-01-23 3:26:42 PM  
You can categorize illustrations of black holes as pre- or post-Interstellar.
 
2022-01-23 3:34:03 PM  

edmo: To contemplate these numbers is to know you are nothing.

No wonder people run from science.


TBH, this isn't science. They used science to make an educated WAG, but it's still a WAG till it's falsifiable, tested, and independently confirmed via peer review.

Astronomy is simultaneously the most and least impressive field.

"We think this really cool thing because of data we got from a few photons from the Omicron Persei system!"

Cool!

"We have no way of confirming it whatsoever and you couldn't get there to see it even in a magic spaceship that could go c."

Less cool.
 
2022-01-23 3:41:20 PM  
Assuming 100 billion galaxies in the visible Universe and a total of 40 quintillion stellar-mass black holes, every galaxy would have 400 million stellar-mass black holes on average.
 
2022-01-23 4:05:05 PM  

eyeq360: Assuming 100 billion galaxies in the visible Universe and a total of 40 quintillion stellar-mass black holes, every galaxy would have 400 million stellar-mass black holes on average.


Assuming one galaxy in the visible universe and 40 quintillion stellar mass black holes, the milky way is pretty thicc now.
 
2022-01-23 4:57:56 PM  
Enough to fill Albert Hall?
 
2022-01-23 5:24:38 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: So how much "dark matter" are we talking about?



0% of dark matter
 
2022-01-23 6:16:07 PM  
What if dark matter is just the part of the universe that hasn't invented light yet?

/My kids are going to have the worst time learning.
 
2022-01-23 6:34:51 PM  
Actually, is there enough mass in the universe to bend spacetime into a sphere? Could expansion be explained by a universal Ouroboros sucking its own butthole?
 
2022-01-23 10:50:06 PM  

nocturn: a universal Ouroboros sucking its own butthole?


Please, we just got rid of one of those in the White House. Don't start painting the Universe orange.
 
2022-01-23 11:31:14 PM  
Thankfully space is mostly... space. A bunch of black holes zipping around is like shooting a shotgun at a cloud of gnats. Probably not going to hit anything.
 
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