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(Phys Org2)   Just when you thought you knew everything water can do there's this   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Water, Temperature, Fahrenheit, Associate Professor Jonathan Boreyko, properties of water, Liquid, heat source, fellow Mojtaba Edalatpour  
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2027 clicks; posted to STEM » on 23 Jan 2022 at 6:20 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-01-23 2:26:01 AM  
Their work was published on Jan. 21 in the journal Physical Review Fluids



Dammit I knew I shouldn't have let my subsciption to Physical Review Fluids expire!!!
 
2022-01-23 7:04:43 AM  
I like what it does to t-shirts
 
2022-01-23 7:38:40 AM  
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2022-01-23 7:45:24 AM  

Redwing: Their work was published on Jan. 21 in the journal Physical Review Fluids


Dammit I knew I shouldn't have let my subsciption to Physical Review Fluids expire!!!


It's just a pornhub search away.
 
2022-01-23 8:18:49 AM  
So for practical applications of their work, they found that ice can be used in water to cool things down more quickly than water alone.
 
2022-01-23 10:55:19 AM  

sxacho: So for practical applications of their work, they found that ice can be used in water to cool things down more quickly than water alone.


My general impression was more "if you make an ice and water and surface sandwich instead of just introducing icy water to the surface, it is signicifanctly quicker to cool and the ice hangs around longer"

which isn't immediately as obvious as just "ice water will cool something down faster than room temperature water, keep dumping ice into your water cooling setup as it melts"
 
2022-01-23 11:12:02 AM  

evilmrsock: sxacho: So for practical applications of their work, they found that ice can be used in water to cool things down more quickly than water alone.

My general impression was more "if you make an ice and water and surface sandwich instead of just introducing icy water to the surface, it is signicifanctly quicker to cool and the ice hangs around longer"

which isn't immediately as obvious as just "ice water will cool something down faster than room temperature water, keep dumping ice into your water cooling setup as it melts"


I'm sure I'm missing something but it seems more like a college thermodynamics lab experiment about specific heat.
 
2022-01-23 11:12:53 AM  
Nice clickbait title, Virginia Tech.

A better title would've been "Boiling water discovered to be optimal heat transfer process" and a sub headline: "Ice can cool faster than plain water by trapping boiling water in a film during a wide window of high temperatures. This has many practical implications. It all started with watching dancing water on a hot plate."

And I would've read to the end and not have been disappointed.
 
2022-01-23 12:35:49 PM  
Something wrong with the 'Cool' tag subby?

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2022-01-23 1:14:58 PM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: Nice clickbait title, Virginia Tech.

A better title would've been "Boiling water discovered to be optimal heat transfer process" and a sub headline: "Ice can cool faster than plain water by trapping boiling water in a film during a wide window of high temperatures. This has many practical implications. It all started with watching dancing water on a hot plate."

And I would've read to the end and not have been disappointed.


Yuck. You SUCK at writing concise headlines
 
2022-01-23 5:05:29 PM  
Hard to learn more when the writer hasn't got a farking clue. Good science writing died over a decade ago. Now we've got people, who failed every high school science class they ever took, out there pretending to be science writers.
 
2022-01-23 6:20:28 PM  

Russ1642: Hard to learn more when the writer hasn't got a farking clue. Good science writing died over a decade ago. Now we've got people, who failed every high school science class they ever took, out there pretending to be science writers.


This was lifted from the Virginia Tech website, for what it's worth. The original does have a link to the published journal article:

https://journals.aps.org/prfluids/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevFluids.7.014004

The full text is paywalled, though.
 
2022-01-23 6:31:25 PM  
I have successfully applied a working knowledge of the subtle properties of ice-heat transfer...

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2022-01-23 7:26:27 PM  
Phase change of water is very interesting. Water has very special properties. Gardeners have long known that you can keep plants from freezing by putting water filled enclosures around them. As the water freezes, it makes the plants just a little bit warmer than freezing. Then the ice around them makes an insulative barrier.

Scale it all up and do some hocus pocus and melting steel is not impossible, I guess.
 
2022-01-23 8:03:31 PM  
Pretty often in the morning, when I boil water for coffee, my steel kettle develops some condensation on the bottom, which drips onto the gas burner. I then get to watch the droplet rolling around like crazy due to this Leidenfrost effect (who knew it was German?), for a few seconds until it evaporates completely.

I was just Googling it, and apparently the direction of the droplets can be controlled if the surface has ridges that are milled at a slant:

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And since it was on the internet, somebody did this:

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2022-01-24 2:07:50 AM  

Russ1642: Hard to learn more when the writer hasn't got a farking clue. Good science writing died over a decade ago. Now we've got people, who failed every high school science class they ever took, out there pretending to be science writers.


I'm late to the thread, but in case you're not aware, good science writing lives on at Science News. I have subscribed for four decades and it's consistently high-quality.
 
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