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(Medium)   Like reading the latest from the bestseller lists? Too bad. Here's the Weird Old Book Finder, it only finds books from the 18th and 19th centuries   (debugger.medium.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Last fall, algorithmic feeds of big social media, concept, attention, essay  
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2000 clicks; posted to Main » and Entertainment » on 22 Jan 2022 at 11:02 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-01-22 8:08:39 AM  
As a guy who just moved into a weird old house (1859) with a weird old library, this interests me.
 
2022-01-22 11:05:27 AM  
Those books weren't weird back then.
 
TWX
2022-01-22 11:05:37 AM  
So, like, Project Guttenberg?

carboncostume.comView Full Size
 
TWX
2022-01-22 11:09:56 AM  
An example of a weird old book:

thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-22 11:14:18 AM  

kdawg7736: Those books weren't weird back then.


Because people have always just enjoyed reading ordinary stories of everyday life?

Part of the appeal of literature or any art form from any period is flaunting the norms.
 
2022-01-22 11:21:01 AM  
Looking for "moon" I found, THE MOON. Her Motions, Aspects, Scenery, and Physical Condition by Richard A Proctor. In it he talks about the rays from Tycho crater.  I kept thinking, "You're so close man... relax... you'll get it."
 
2022-01-22 11:25:15 AM  

Metastatic Capricorn: As a guy who just moved into a weird old house (1859) with a weird old library, this interests me.


Describe this unit. My librarian senses are igniting.
 
2022-01-22 11:28:34 AM  
Ye Olde Farke, by Drewe Curtiss published in 1769?
 
2022-01-22 11:33:29 AM  
I tried one out. Journal of a Plague Year by Daniel Defoe

The search engine turned up a book which examined Defoe's sources. It began with a discussion of the question of JoaPY's authenticity. It had quickly been dismissed/admired as a work of complete fiction, but the author of the text from the search engine insisted that every incident that Defoe included had been based upon genuine documents that Defoe had found. So, pencil in Journal of a Plague Year on my reading list this year. Our 3rd year of plague.

I'd forgotten to make a note of the title and a subsequent search turned up the Defoe book itself.
 
2022-01-22 11:34:42 AM  
Always looking for My Confession, the book Blood Meridian was based on.  Never finding it, but did find here an ancient story about the ferry over the Colorado river the Glanton Gang set up that was described in the story.
 
2022-01-22 11:35:51 AM  
My favorite books are old books.
 
2022-01-22 11:35:54 AM  

Valter: Metastatic Capricorn: As a guy who just moved into a weird old house (1859) with a weird old library, this interests me.

Describe this unit. My librarian senses are igniting.


Here are a few pics. We're still moving in, hence the unhung art. Also included, a small same of our signed and first éditions.

Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-22 11:38:01 AM  
There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-22 11:38:47 AM  

Metastatic Capricorn: Valter: Metastatic Capricorn: As a guy who just moved into a weird old house (1859) with a weird old library, this interests me.

Describe this unit. My librarian senses are igniting.

Here are a few pics. We're still moving in, hence the unhung art. Also included, a small same of our signed and first éditions.

[Fark user image 425x318][Fark user image 425x318][Fark user image 425x566]


If I could feel those books with my hands. Better than reading them with my eyes.
 
2022-01-22 11:40:35 AM  

Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]


your house is cool
 
2022-01-22 11:47:40 AM  

Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]


Kudos to you for fully committing to Naughty Librarian role playing with entire playrooms to set the mood.

I respect that.
 
2022-01-22 11:53:12 AM  

west.la.lawyer: Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]

your house is cool



The historic registry description of my home:

Greek Revival/Italianate Style.
This large 2 1/2-story mansion is one of a pair with its neighbor to the south at #5 Cedar Street. Basically square in plan, the house faces Reading Avenue and overlooks the town to the west. It is 5 bays wide in front, with a center entry. There are no additions or extensions. The structure is set on a stuccoed stone foundation, and the walls are clapboard with massive pilaster-treated cornerboards. A square, hipped-roof cupola crowns the shallow hipped roof The cupola has an extended cornice, carried on brackets, and is surmounted by a turned finial. An interior brick chimney rises from each corner of the house. The cornice is very deeply extended, molded and boxed, and the wide frieze incorporates 3-light eyebrow windows, one at each bay. -Windows have stepped cornice lintels, 6-over-6 sash, and solid panelled shutters on the 1st floor with movable-louver shutters above. There is a 2-sided hipped-roof porch on the west and south sides, with square posts supporting arched spandrel trim, each arch centered by a turned pendant and carrying scroll-sawn bulls-eyes in its corners. The handrail has replacement X-braced trim, and continues as stair rail flanking a long flight of 12 steps to the ground. The front entry has a cornice lintel over a 3-part surround with transom and sidelights over wood panels. The single door has 2 round-arched panels over square panels.

Outbuildings:

There is a frame privy, its walls clapboard with cornerboards, and a tin roof. The structure is set atop a framework of timbers replacing a foundation that has given way. Except for the failed stone foundation, the privy is in good condition. 

A clapboard garage, built in 1992, respects the character of the house.
 
2022-01-22 11:53:28 AM  
physics: "Physics", by Mann and Twiss, copyright 1905.

On radiation:
"The refraction of light and the "interference experiments" lead to the supposition that light is a wave motion in the ether. All other light phenomena are satisfactorily explained by this supposition. It is therefore accepted as an established theory."

Special Relativity was published in 1905. Mass and Twiss are about to have their minds blown.
 
2022-01-22 12:12:07 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: physics: "Physics", by Mann and Twiss, copyright 1905.

On radiation:
"The refraction of light and the "interference experiments" lead to the supposition that light is a wave motion in the ether. All other light phenomena are satisfactorily explained by this supposition. It is therefore accepted as an established theory."

Special Relativity was published in 1905. Mass and Twiss are about to have their minds blown.


That should be Mann and Twiss there at the end. Mass doesn't get its mind blown until General Relativity is published.
 
2022-01-22 12:12:27 PM  
Interesting that a 400 year old poem reads like it could have been written today (by a Welsh drunkard).
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-22 12:28:12 PM  

Wookie Milson: Interesting that a 400 year old poem reads like it could have been written today (by a Welsh drunkard).
[Fark user image image 850x578]


"Some mistakes are built to last." -George Michael
 
2022-01-22 1:26:15 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: Wookie Milson: Interesting that a 400 year old poem reads like it could have been written today (by a Welsh drunkard).
[Fark user image image 850x578]

"Some mistakes are built to last." -George Michael


Well that's what you get.
 
2022-01-22 1:46:53 PM  

Wookie Milson: Interesting that a 400 year old poem reads like it could have been written today (by a Welsh drunkard).
[Fark user image 850x578]


It was ever thus.
 
2022-01-22 1:50:10 PM  
Kewl, I can use this as a search engine for vintage books that I find while browsing etsy.

Bookmarked into my etsy folder.
 
2022-01-22 2:09:55 PM  
Pussy butt fart cock

I'm pleasantly surprised.
 
2022-01-22 2:24:52 PM  
About time. Why would something I need so much take so long for nerds and geeks to think of making?
 
2022-01-22 2:49:48 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]


Of course it matters to you, but HOW MUCH? I told my wife I could incapacitate her with envy. Then, I showed her that picture.

And she was.
 
2022-01-22 3:31:38 PM  
I am a true bibliophile, I only like books under eighteen years of age.
 
2022-01-22 4:48:04 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]


Fark is not my personal erotica site
Fark is not my personal erotica site
Fark is not my personal erotica site
Fark is not my personal erotica site
Fark is not my personal erotica site
Fark is not my personal erotica site
 
2022-01-22 4:54:45 PM  

yakmans_dad: Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]

Of course it matters to you, but HOW MUCH? I told my wife I could incapacitate her with envy. Then, I showed her that picture.

And she was.


Here's another picture from the owner who commissioned its construction. The plane of the desk is a single piece of wood. It is still there. Personal belongings were removed, but the entirety of the library shelving, drawers, and other features are still intact. I'm being cagey about the name of the owner because it would give away a lot of info.  That person also developed a very nice garden on the property. 

Fark user imageView Full Size


I can't tell you how much the construction cost. The Michael Flood documented his work here.
 
2022-01-22 4:57:02 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: The woodworker, Michael Flood,


FTFM
 
2022-01-22 5:31:12 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: Metastatic Capricorn: The woodworker, Michael Flood,

FTFM


Not the Australian sociologist and author of Lust, Trust, and Latex?
 
2022-01-22 5:48:04 PM  
Https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/realestate/elizabeth-gilberts-new-chapter-begins.amp.html?referringSource=articleShare
 
2022-01-22 5:59:57 PM  

KumquatMay: Https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/realestate/elizabeth-gilberts-new-chapter-begins.amp.html?referringSource=articleShare


Somebody did a google image search ;-)

Yeah... that's it.
 
2022-01-22 6:11:52 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: KumquatMay: Https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/realestate/elizabeth-gilberts-new-chapter-begins.amp.html?referringSource=articleShare

Somebody did a google image search ;-)

Yeah... that's it.


Actually remembered the Skybrary from the article more or less. Have a close friend kinda nearby (Piermont). So knew where to look...
 
2022-01-22 6:14:31 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: west.la.lawyer: Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]

your house is cool


The historic registry description of my home:

Greek Revival/Italianate Style.
This large 2 1/2-story mansion is one of a pair with its neighbor to the south at #5 Cedar Street. Basically square in plan, the house faces Reading Avenue and overlooks the town to the west. It is 5 bays wide in front, with a center entry. There are no additions or extensions. The structure is set on a stuccoed stone foundation, and the walls are clapboard with massive pilaster-treated cornerboards. A square, hipped-roof cupola crowns the shallow hipped roof The cupola has an extended cornice, carried on brackets, and is surmounted by a turned finial. An interior brick chimney rises from each corner of the house. The cornice is very deeply extended, molded and boxed, and the wide frieze incorporates 3-light eyebrow windows, one at each bay. -Windows have stepped cornice lintels, 6-over-6 sash, and solid panelled shutters on the 1st floor with movable-louver shutters above. There is a 2-sided hipped-roof porch on the west and south sides, with square posts supporting arched spandrel trim, each arch centered by a turned pendant and carrying scroll-sawn bulls-eyes in its corners. The handrail has replacement X-braced trim, and continues as stair rail flanking a long flight of 12 steps to the ground. The front entry has a cornice lintel over a 3-part surround with transom and sidelights over wood panels. The single door has 2 round-arched panels over square panels.

Outbuildings:

There is a frame privy, its walls clapboard with cornerboards, and a tin roof. The structure is set atop a framework of timbers replacing a foundation that has given way. Except for the failed stone foundation, the privy is in good condition. 

A clapboard garage, built in 1992, respects the character of the house.


Elderly gentleman walks into the confession booth:
-father, I had sex with an 18 year old lady
- I'm sorry to hear that. When was your last confession?
- this is my first time, I'm Jewish
- then why are you telling me this?
- I'm telling everybody
 
2022-01-22 6:16:31 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: yakmans_dad: Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]

Of course it matters to you, but HOW MUCH? I told my wife I could incapacitate her with envy. Then, I showed her that picture.

And she was.

Here's another picture from the owner who commissioned its construction. The plane of the desk is a single piece of wood. It is still there. Personal belongings were removed, but the entirety of the library shelving, drawers, and other features are still intact. I'm being cagey about the name of the owner because it would give away a lot of info.  That person also developed a very nice garden on the property. 

[Fark user image image 850x493]

I can't tell you how much the construction cost. The Michael Flood documented his work here.


Really nice vibe.
I love houses that have developed private and semi-private spaces.

Congrats on the move.

/paging Benevolent Misanthrope to this amusing thread
 
2022-01-22 6:20:46 PM  

KumquatMay: Metastatic Capricorn: KumquatMay: Https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/20/realestate/elizabeth-gilberts-new-chapter-begins.amp.html?referringSource=articleShare

Somebody did a google image search ;-)

Yeah... that's it.

Actually remembered the Skybrary from the article more or less. Have a close friend kinda nearby (Piermont). So knew where to look...


Sadly, the owners between us and Gilbert didn't understand the place, then they rented it to folk who didn't know how to take care of it. So, we're doing a lot of repairs and renovations.

But, as long as the cat is out of the bag, here is Gilbert giving a tour of the place, including a better view of the "Skybrary" -- not a term we're using:

Eat, Pray, Crib - Own author Elizabeth Gilbert's beautiful home.
Youtube k8tEOwNTloU
 
2022-01-22 6:22:02 PM  
Going back on topic, I'm trying to remember what weird old books I've read, and apparently I've never read much from that period in general (ignoring the classics).
I do recall some well-aged book on the occult, but that's probably it. Even that, I probably read some thirty years ago and don't recall the title.
That's when I first read of Aleister Crowley.
Guy felt like an English version of Rasputin.
 
2022-01-22 6:28:42 PM  
Also back on topic...

Miss Mapp is in the Weird Old Book Finder. It's an light, fluffy, moderately humorous slice of English life. Can recommend.

https://books.google.com/books?id=RacVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA3#v=onepage&q&f=false

"Miss Elizabeth Mapp might have been forty, and she had taken advantage of this opportunity by being just a year or two older. Her face was of high vivid colour and was corrugated by chronic rage and curiosity  [...]"
 
2022-01-22 6:31:33 PM  

Metastatic Capricorn: Also back on topic...

Miss Mapp is in the Weird Old Book Finder. It's an light, fluffy, moderately humorous slice of English life. Can recommend.

https://books.google.com/books?id=RacVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA3#v=onepage&q&f=false

"Miss Elizabeth Mapp might have been forty, and she had taken advantage of this opportunity by being just a year or two older. Her face was of high vivid colour and was corrugated by chronic rage and curiosity  [...]"


Love Mapp & Lucia!
 
2022-01-22 6:32:41 PM  

Valter: Metastatic Capricorn: As a guy who just moved into a weird old house (1859) with a weird old library, this interests me.

Describe this unit. My librarian senses are igniting.


Mystery at Thunderbolt House no doubt.
 
2022-01-22 6:37:09 PM  
Just read Concrete Island by J.G. Ballard. I guess it was weird because of the plausible yet totally ridiculous concept. But I'm one of those sad rush hour denizens like sperm up a urethra or shiat down a mostly blocked colon so maybe I am biased.
 
2022-01-22 6:37:47 PM  

Resident Muslim: Metastatic Capricorn: yakmans_dad: Metastatic Capricorn: There is a second library in the attic. It is unpopulated at the moment. Here is what it looks like with stuff in it -- photo from a prior owner. She told the wood worker, "Make it look like it grew here."

[i.pinimg.com image 640x413]

Of course it matters to you, but HOW MUCH? I told my wife I could incapacitate her with envy. Then, I showed her that picture.

And she was.

Here's another picture from the owner who commissioned its construction. The plane of the desk is a single piece of wood. It is still there. Personal belongings were removed, but the entirety of the library shelving, drawers, and other features are still intact. I'm being cagey about the name of the owner because it would give away a lot of info.  That person also developed a very nice garden on the property. 

[Fark user image image 850x493]

I can't tell you how much the construction cost. The Michael Flood documented his work here.

Really nice vibe.
I love houses that have developed private and semi-private spaces.

Congrats on the move.

/paging Benevolent Misanthrope to this amusing thread



Hey - thanks for the shout!

What an incredible home.  And fark that noise about Fark not being my personal erotica site - this home has it ALL.

Congrats on the new, amazing home, Metastatic Capricorn!
 
2022-01-22 7:11:40 PM  
Interesting Library Fact...

I lived in Bangor, Maine for a while.  The library was astonishing.  It had the HIGHEST CIRCULATION RATE in the country: most books taken out by people per year.  And it had TONS of books squirreled away on every subject you could think of.  I routinely borrowed books from as early as 1843 -- like to take home! -- and they had books from the 1700s you could also read there, with gloves on.  Wild!
 
2022-01-23 12:05:39 AM  

comrade: Pussy butt fart cock

I'm pleasantly surprised.


In that era, I'm not sure the other three were used in their modern definitions, but fart humor is timeless.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-23 1:52:40 AM  

cyberspacedout: comrade: Pussy butt fart cock

I'm pleasantly surprised.

In that era, I'm not sure the other three were used in their modern definitions, but fart humor is timeless.

[Fark user image 436x688]


1900 B.C.E. Sumeria: Something which has never occurred since time immemorial; a young woman did not fart in her husband's lap.

/they have the clay tablet and everything
//course it might have been the equivalent of "and boy are my arms tired" for Sumerians or something
///no guarantee that the one joke we actually found preserved was considered to be that funny even at the time
 
2022-01-23 11:32:11 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: 1900 B.C.E. Sumeria: Something which has never occurred since time immemorial; a young woman did not fart in her husband's lap.


You do have to wonder what Sumerians were eating that made them so flatulent.
 
2022-01-23 11:36:02 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: And fark that noise


complete tangent alert

OK. This is around the 3rd time in a week that I've seen that phraseon Fark. "F*ck that noise" was a phrase from my teen years. Many many many moons ago. I imagined it to have been a regional expression. (Kentucky. and environs)

similar to "take pipe" , [I never understood "take pipe" until I read the entire original: take pipe and die. It refers to carbon monoxide poisoning.]

Does anyone know the age and extent of "f*ck that noise"?
 
2022-01-23 11:51:31 AM  

yakmans_dad: Benevolent Misanthrope: And fark that noise

complete tangent alert

OK. This is around the 3rd time in a week that I've seen that phraseon Fark. "F*ck that noise" was a phrase from my teen years. Many many many moons ago. I imagined it to have been a regional expression. (Kentucky. and environs)

similar to "take pipe" , [I never understood "take pipe" until I read the entire original: take pipe and die. It refers to carbon monoxide poisoning.]

Does anyone know the age and extent of "f*ck that noise"?


Definitely not a Southern thing, I've heard it all over.  Even Canada.   WordSense's earliest cite is 1977, but I think it was common in larger cities before that.  I find it remarkably evocative of outright dismissal.
 
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