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(Axios)   Time for Operation Warp Speed Two: Electric Boogaloo   (axios.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Vaccination, Immune system, Vaccine, new arsenal of COVID vaccines, Omicron variant, much havoc, Omicron's blitz, vaccine protection  
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1755 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Jan 2022 at 5:05 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-01-21 2:49:06 PM  
But relying on Omicron-specific vaccines is risky, experts say, because there's no guarantee they'll work against the next variant, or even provide strong protection against other existing variants.

The flu shot protects against 4 flu variants.  Is their a reason that a Covid shot couldn't do the same?  Can you only have 1 type of mRNA in each shot?
 
2022-01-21 5:43:00 PM  

aleister_greynight: But relying on Omicron-specific vaccines is risky, experts say, because there's no guarantee they'll work against the next variant, or even provide strong protection against other existing variants.

The flu shot protects against 4 flu variants.  Is their a reason that a Covid shot couldn't do the same?  Can you only have 1 type of mRNA in each shot?


The military has apparently been working on a multivariant vaccine that expresses a variety of spike proteins on a central body. Interested to see where that goes.
 
2022-01-21 5:57:26 PM  

aleister_greynight: But relying on Omicron-specific vaccines is risky, experts say, because there's no guarantee they'll work against the next variant, or even provide strong protection against other existing variants.

The flu shot protects against 4 flu variants.  Is their a reason that a Covid shot couldn't do the same?  Can you only have 1 type of mRNA in each shot?


No reason at all.

Moderna even tested a bivalent shot that encoded the OG and the Beta spikes for possible use in South Africa.

The tl;dr is, "it worked fine. And it worked better against beta, as you'd expect. But there wasn't nearly the quantum leap in protection vs just giving a 3rd shot of the original that would justify the cost and disruption of making a new shot."

It was the same with delta.

It was not with omicron so we're getting a new shot.

I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.
 
2022-01-21 6:08:36 PM  

erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.


..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?
 
2022-01-21 6:13:03 PM  

The Bestest: erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.

..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?


Nasal like flonase or misted like inhalers
 
2022-01-21 6:13:53 PM  

The Bestest: erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.

..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?


Now I'm wondering how practical a cocaine metered dose inhaler would be...
 
2022-01-21 6:18:27 PM  
Definitely there is a need, having a vaccine that still lets people become infected and spread the virus to others, even if it is at a lower rate, doesn't have much of an impact on the pandemic. We've got about 95% of people vaccinated in Australia and the virus is still running rampant. And why not, when it really doesn't have a problem infecting vaccinated people, there are plenty of hosts to jump to.

That you can be infected and infectious despite being vaccinated also seems to be a popular point anti-vaxxers bring up to support their stance. I've not met one who thinks death from covid is even possible, they all think it's just the flu. Sure other people occasionally die, but that is always because they really had something else. Then they boast about how they have never even had the flu, though they never get a flu vax, because their immune systems are just that good. *rolls eyes and gets as far away as possible*
 
2022-01-21 6:29:14 PM  
So, current vaccines don't stop infection or spread.  You know what does?  Full on total and hard core military enforced martial law lockdowns.  Unless you are the science and you as science have proof that omincron can quantum tunnel from lung to lung to lung to lung.  In that case, we need to develop quantum tunnel barriers.

30 days total lockdown world wide.  The only people out should be the military sniping anybody who isn't military.  And have the super powers nuke any country that doesn't do the same.
 
2022-01-21 6:32:47 PM  

Nidiot: That you can be infected and infectious despite being vaccinated also seems to be a popular point anti-vaxxers bring up to support their stance.


I want a good clip of someone saying this while wearing body armor of similar or less protective value.
 
2022-01-21 6:52:46 PM  

Nidiot: Definitely there is a need, having a vaccine that still lets people become infected and spread the virus to others, even if it is at a lower rate, doesn't have much of an impact on the pandemic. We've got about 95% of people vaccinated in Australia and the virus is still running rampant. And why not, when it really doesn't have a problem infecting vaccinated people, there are plenty of hosts to jump to.

That you can be infected and infectious despite being vaccinated also seems to be a popular point anti-vaxxers bring up to support their stance. I've not met one who thinks death from covid is even possible, they all think it's just the flu. Sure other people occasionally die, but that is always because they really had something else. Then they boast about how they have never even had the flu, though they never get a flu vax, because their immune systems are just that good. *rolls eyes and gets as far away as possible*


Vaccines still let people get infected and spread the virus to others. There is no vaccine that is 100% effective. The lower rate is exactly how pandemics are ended. Expecting perfection when it has never been achieved before is part of the problem.
 
2022-01-21 6:56:54 PM  

incendi: The Bestest: erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.

..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?

Now I'm wondering how practical a cocaine metered dose inhaler would be...


A coke bullet?
 
2022-01-21 7:08:48 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: So, current vaccines don't stop infection or spread.  You know what does?  Full on total and hard core military enforced martial law lockdowns.  Unless you are the science and you as science have proof that omincron can quantum tunnel from lung to lung to lung to lung.  In that case, we need to develop quantum tunnel barriers.

30 days total lockdown world wide.  The only people out should be the military sniping anybody who isn't military.  And have the super powers nuke any country that doesn't do the same.


Username checks out.
 
2022-01-21 7:12:22 PM  
I got stupider the more I read that article. Pretty much everything the author listed as a "to do" is already being done. Also, the point of "warp speed" was to remove barriers for testing and production not develop the vaccine. I think the author needs to go back and study up before writing another article like that.
 
2022-01-21 7:46:00 PM  

thehellisthis: The Bestest: erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.

..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?

Nasal like flonase or misted like inhalers


We should put it in plane chem trails. That way everyone will get the vaxx.
 
2022-01-21 8:12:00 PM  

Troy Aikman's Giant Thumbs: Nidiot: Definitely there is a need, having a vaccine that still lets people become infected and spread the virus to others, even if it is at a lower rate, doesn't have much of an impact on the pandemic. We've got about 95% of people vaccinated in Australia and the virus is still running rampant. And why not, when it really doesn't have a problem infecting vaccinated people, there are plenty of hosts to jump to.

That you can be infected and infectious despite being vaccinated also seems to be a popular point anti-vaxxers bring up to support their stance. I've not met one who thinks death from covid is even possible, they all think it's just the flu. Sure other people occasionally die, but that is always because they really had something else. Then they boast about how they have never even had the flu, though they never get a flu vax, because their immune systems are just that good. *rolls eyes and gets as far away as possible*

Vaccines still let people get infected and spread the virus to others. There is no vaccine that is 100% effective. The lower rate is exactly how pandemics are ended. Expecting perfection when it has never been achieved before is part of the problem.


Well, with Omicron the rate is not low enough.

For example: Researchers found that two doses of Pfizer provided 70 percent protection against hospitalization and 33 percent protection against infection from Omicron. This was a drop from about 93 percent and 80 percent, respectively, for the Delta variant.

80 percent protection against infection is a hell of a lot better than 33 percent.

There's a difference between expecting perfection and expecting better, and all I'm asking for is better.

Just imagine how different this current Omicron wave would look if we had 80 percent protection from infection.
 
2022-01-21 10:15:17 PM  

Nidiot: Troy Aikman's Giant Thumbs: Nidiot: Definitely there is a need, having a vaccine that still lets people become infected and spread the virus to others, even if it is at a lower rate, doesn't have much of an impact on the pandemic. We've got about 95% of people vaccinated in Australia and the virus is still running rampant. And why not, when it really doesn't have a problem infecting vaccinated people, there are plenty of hosts to jump to.

That you can be infected and infectious despite being vaccinated also seems to be a popular point anti-vaxxers bring up to support their stance. I've not met one who thinks death from covid is even possible, they all think it's just the flu. Sure other people occasionally die, but that is always because they really had something else. Then they boast about how they have never even had the flu, though they never get a flu vax, because their immune systems are just that good. *rolls eyes and gets as far away as possible*

Vaccines still let people get infected and spread the virus to others. There is no vaccine that is 100% effective. The lower rate is exactly how pandemics are ended. Expecting perfection when it has never been achieved before is part of the problem.

Well, with Omicron the rate is not low enough.

For example: Researchers found that two doses of Pfizer provided 70 percent protection against hospitalization and 33 percent protection against infection from Omicron. This was a drop from about 93 percent and 80 percent, respectively, for the Delta variant.

80 percent protection against infection is a hell of a lot better than 33 percent.

There's a difference between expecting perfection and expecting better, and all I'm asking for is better.

Just imagine how different this current Omicron wave would look if we had 80 percent protection from infection.


Which is why we're getting an omicron specific shot.

I'd also note that this may well be the last covid mrna shot that has to go through "normal" clinical trials.

Between them, Pfizer and Moderna have now tested I think 6 or 7 mRNA shots (2 originals and quite a few strain-specific shots, including the upcoming omicron ones). In an astoundingly short time thanks to remarkable tracking (and... pandemic conditions) we have accumulated an absolutely _staggering_ volume of safety data on these shots, and they are every bit as safe as we'd hoped.

The tests of delta and beta specific shots greased the skids, but the mass deployment of the omicron shot will make it very clear that changing a handful of nucleotides in the mRNA sequence doesn't have an effect on the safety profile. So instead of it taking 4 months to prepare for the next mutant, we'll be able to achieve mass delivery of shots almost as fast as they can be produced - approximately  45-60 days.
 
2022-01-21 10:35:15 PM  

kbronsito: thehellisthis: The Bestest: erik-k: I've seen some extremely promising papers about inhaled vaccines against covid. The key there is, they result in a lot of IgA antibodies (which are secreted in mucus), which exterminates the virus at the point of entry, improving sterilizing immunity and prevention of infection.

..when you say inhaled.. are we talking like asthma meds.. or like coke?

Nasal like flonase or misted like inhalers

We should put it in plane chem trails. That way everyone will get the vaxx.


Just the air ducts at any school board or city council meeting where mask mandates are being discussed should do.
 
2022-01-22 7:49:45 PM  

Nidiot: There's a difference between expecting perfection and expecting better, and all I'm asking for is better.


This sounds exactly like us progressives defending our demands in the Politics tab.  "You can't have perfection!" Cool, we're not asking for that. We're asking for "better than this."

Until we can do things without needing masks, this pandemic isn't over for me. My work life will not return to normal until that is the case.
 
2022-01-22 11:44:44 PM  

austerity101: Nidiot: There's a difference between expecting perfection and expecting better, and all I'm asking for is better.

This sounds exactly like us progressives defending our demands in the Politics tab.  "You can't have perfection!" Cool, we're not asking for that. We're asking for "better than this."

Until we can do things without needing masks, this pandemic isn't over for me. My work life will not return to normal until that is the case.


I like your posts, I've got you in green. I think I vaguely recall you mentioning before that masks interfere with your ability to do your job (but then again my memory is pretty crap). It has me curious now as you what that job is. Super-recogniser who picks out wanted criminals from crowds by recognising their face?

I wonder if sales of lipsticks, and maybe cosmetics in general have gone down.

I feel for those whose hearing is not so good, so that they depend heavily on lip-reading to get by. Can't do that with masks. A lot of people are hit worse by various effects of the pandemic than others.
 
2022-01-23 1:46:10 AM  

Nidiot: austerity101: Nidiot: There's a difference between expecting perfection and expecting better, and all I'm asking for is better.

This sounds exactly like us progressives defending our demands in the Politics tab.  "You can't have perfection!" Cool, we're not asking for that. We're asking for "better than this."

Until we can do things without needing masks, this pandemic isn't over for me. My work life will not return to normal until that is the case.

I like your posts, I've got you in green. I think I vaguely recall you mentioning before that masks interfere with your ability to do your job (but then again my memory is pretty crap). It has me curious now as you what that job is. Super-recogniser who picks out wanted criminals from crowds by recognising their face?

I wonder if sales of lipsticks, and maybe cosmetics in general have gone down.

I feel for those whose hearing is not so good, so that they depend heavily on lip-reading to get by. Can't do that with masks. A lot of people are hit worse by various effects of the pandemic than others.


I'm a collaborative pianist and musical/vocal coach. One of the early things we discovered was that singing was basically a supersoteading event, so my choirs stopped meeting. Then my church went dark for several months. One choir has come back tentatively, but we're meeting less, and we had to scrap our plans for an in-person concert.

Most of what I do otherwise is play at voice lessons, rehearse with singers and wind players, and then perform at recitals, auditions, and for recordings. Well, once we started distancing, lessons changed to being over Zoom, and there was nowhere for me. I did play a couple of recitals, but a lot of people performed with pre-recorded tracks for various things. I did a few of those recordings for people, but also, so many of them already exist for a lot of standard rep. Same goes for a lot of auditions as well.

Oh, and I've done a lot of work playing for opera companies. When the pandemic hit, those opera houses generally closed. Smaller, local companies stopped doing stuff as well. I play for a national opera non-profit--our local chapter has contracted with a space to do monthly performances this year, but January's was canceled. February doesn't look too great. I've had well over a dozen cancelations over the last few weeks--all of that lost work could have covered my rent.
 
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