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(CNN)   Texas decides that the "controlled" part of "controlled burn" is optional   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Wildfire, Bastrop County, Texas, Emergency evacuation, Bastrop, Texas, Bastrop State Park, Texas A&M Forest Service, Controlled burn, Fire  
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3490 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2022 at 2:35 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-01-19 12:12:58 PM  
TPWD doesn't usually fark up like that.  Controlled burns are done by residents all the time.  Typically, you ask the FD, local forest service, etc., if the time is good for a burn then get after it.  I reading the headline was a sure it was a resident who said "fark that" so the face that it was TPWD is surprising.

I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.
 
2022-01-19 2:26:14 PM  
The burn was originally controlled, but one of the officers of the Texas Forest Service who was monitoring the fireline got too close and his sleeve caught on fire. Unfortunately, he didn't remember his training and went flailing around trying to put it out, which easily spread the blaze past a firebreak.

What was worse, though, is that none of the other officers on the scene helped him, because Texas firmly believes that firearms should not be restricted.
 
2022-01-19 2:36:22 PM  
Shoulda raked the leafs.
 
2022-01-19 2:37:49 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: The burn was originally controlled, but one of the officers of the Texas Forest Service who was monitoring the fireline got too close and his sleeve caught on fire. Unfortunately, he didn't remember his training and went flailing around trying to put it out, which easily spread the blaze past a firebreak.

What was worse, though, is that none of the other officers on the scene helped him, because Texas firmly believes that firearms should not be restricted.


c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 2:42:51 PM  
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2022-01-19 2:45:37 PM  
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2022-01-19 2:47:00 PM  

UberDave: TPWD doesn't usually fark up like that.  Controlled burns are done by residents all the time.  Typically, you ask the FD, local forest service, etc., if the time is good for a burn then get after it.  I reading the headline was a sure it was a resident who said "fark that" so the face that it was TPWD is surprising.

I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.


I see the dark, underbelly of Jade Helm at work.  Jade Helm never left Bastrop.
 
2022-01-19 2:48:59 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: What was worse, though, is that none of the other officers on the scene helped him, because Texas firmly believes that firearms should not be restricted.


memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 2:56:05 PM  
So are they having a boy or a girl?
 
2022-01-19 2:59:40 PM  
Why the hell is that county always on fire?
 
2022-01-19 2:59:49 PM  
So they control their fires about as well as they control their Covid.
 
2022-01-19 3:08:07 PM  

bumblefuss: Why the hell is that county always on fire?


It's dry, arid, very little water.  Even when they have water around it's not safe

Shelly Perdue Sets Her Water on Fire In Granbury, Texas
Youtube 7B9-tmudFg0
 
2022-01-19 3:09:08 PM  
Not an area that needs more wildfires, ones about 10 years ago were insane.  I helped plant baby trees after that, hopefully none of those little guys burned.

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2022-01-19 3:10:33 PM  
That happened near me once... we have pretty regular prescribed burns here to keep the pine bush habitat healthy.  Fortunately they were able to regain containment before too much damage was done.
 
2022-01-19 3:16:02 PM  
have they tried raking up the leaves to prevent these things from getting out of control?
 
2022-01-19 3:33:56 PM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 3:38:31 PM  
SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED!!
 
2022-01-19 3:41:49 PM  
Fire: "You don't control me! Muh rights!"
 
2022-01-19 3:42:57 PM  
So, it wasn't an exploding chemical plant next door to an elementary school this time?

Will wonders never cease.
 
2022-01-19 3:51:52 PM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 4:01:26 PM  

hammettman: bumblefuss: Why the hell is that county always on fire?

It's dry, arid, very little water.  Even when they have water around it's not safe

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/7B9-tmudFg0]


From the way she's squatting in the starting frame of that you-tube clip, I wasn't quite sure what kind of "watering" video that was going to be.
 
2022-01-19 4:01:34 PM  

UberDave: I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.


Sometimes it doesn't take much.  The wind can pick up a little bit and blow something across your line you don't see or there could just be an ember that was missed on cleanup.

I was on a burn that got away once.  It was at a residence that was turning 50 acres or so into prairie.  We were burning one side of a driveway that was a mix of cornfield and weeds.  To our back was replanted grassland.  I'm on a flapper watching the firebreak/driveway when I see a corn silk blow to the other side of the driveway and into the grass.  No big deal.  Get the burn bosses attention and get the gator with the pump on it to move 50 feet and put it out.

That's when things got fun.  They had too much hose out and when they tried to move the gator, the hose got tangled in the wheel.  No need to panic yet.  The burn boss radios the other crew at the end of the driveway to bring their pump over while we cut the hose off and get the nozzle reattached.  Other crew gets there, goes to start their pump, and the cord breaks.  Now we're farked.  By the time we got our hose fixed, which really didn't take more than a couple of minutes, the fire was ripping through the grass.  Thank god there was powerline right of way at the other side of the field and the wind blew the fire the right way, or we would have burnt down the house and everything around it.  Boss still had to explain to the owner why there was 300x30 yards of scorched grass that wasn't supposed to be burned until next year, but it could have been worse.
 
2022-01-19 4:05:26 PM  

UberDave: TPWD doesn't usually fark up like that.  Controlled burns are done by residents all the time.  Typically, you ask the FD, local forest service, etc., if the time is good for a burn then get after it.  I reading the headline was a sure it was a resident who said "fark that" so the face that it was TPWD is surprising.

I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.


It was windy as fark; I have my doubts as to how controllable a burn was under the conditions in the first place.
 
2022-01-19 4:17:44 PM  

Barnhawk72: Not an area that needs more wildfires, ones about 10 years ago were insane.  I helped plant baby trees after that, hopefully none of those little guys burned.

[Fark user image 425x318]


Broke my heart when that happened. I used to drive from Austin to the little park road that connects the two state parks there and back just to get away for a bit. Was devastated to see what was left of the forest after that fire.
 
2022-01-19 4:28:56 PM  
4 hours.  Fark you're slipping.

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2022-01-19 4:34:16 PM  

misanthropic1: UberDave: TPWD doesn't usually fark up like that.  Controlled burns are done by residents all the time.  Typically, you ask the FD, local forest service, etc., if the time is good for a burn then get after it.  I reading the headline was a sure it was a resident who said "fark that" so the face that it was TPWD is surprising.

I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.

It was windy as fark; I have my doubts as to how controllable a burn was under the conditions in the first place.


If that's true, the burn boss might be out of a job. I've been on planned burns where we got up at 3am, drove three hours, prepared for another hour, and then had to shut the whole thing down because the wind or humidity was out of range at the last minute. I understand that you might have sudden condition changes during the burn, but if your area is prone to those that should also be taken into consideration.

The bigger problem is how this plays out in public. People already biatch and moan enough about burns, so the last thing we need are fark-ups like this to make it worse.

/In our organization, a burn boss who has an escape is pretty much done forever unless there are *very* extenuating circumstances.
 
2022-01-19 4:36:21 PM  
This is probably the best analogy for the farkup that is the GOP controlled Texass government
 
2022-01-19 4:50:45 PM  
I thought this headline would be about covid.
 
2022-01-19 5:47:25 PM  
I'm surprised they didn't line the perimeter with women first.
 
2022-01-19 7:28:30 PM  
The correct nomenclature is "prescribed burn" any long time bush monkey will tell you that "controlling" anything to do with wildfire is extremely difficult to impossible.

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/safety/wildfire-status/prevention/vegetation-and-fuel-management/prescribed-burning
 
2022-01-19 8:53:47 PM  

Jeebus Saves: UberDave: I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.

Sometimes it doesn't take much.  The wind can pick up a little bit and blow something across your line you don't see or there could just be an ember that was missed on cleanup.

I was on a burn that got away once.  It was at a residence that was turning 50 acres or so into prairie.  We were burning one side of a driveway that was a mix of cornfield and weeds.  To our back was replanted grassland.  I'm on a flapper watching the firebreak/driveway when I see a corn silk blow to the other side of the driveway and into the grass.  No big deal.  Get the burn bosses attention and get the gator with the pump on it to move 50 feet and put it out.

That's when things got fun.  They had too much hose out and when they tried to move the gator, the hose got tangled in the wheel.  No need to panic yet.  The burn boss radios the other crew at the end of the driveway to bring their pump over while we cut the hose off and get the nozzle reattached.  Other crew gets there, goes to start their pump, and the cord breaks.  Now we're farked.  By the time we got our hose fixed, which really didn't take more than a couple of minutes, the fire was ripping through the grass.  Thank god there was powerline right of way at the other side of the field and the wind blew the fire the right way, or we would have burnt down the house and everything around it.  Boss still had to explain to the owner why there was 300x30 yards of scorched grass that wasn't supposed to be burned until next year, but it could have been worse.


Also, if you watched the 'burning water' vid, you may have noticed invisible fire that looked like that fire had gone out, only to see it flare up again without her re-lighting it. I have seen this 'invisible' fire run across dry grass onlt to flare up at spots several feet away. This is a big percentage of how a 'control' burn can slip ahead or behind those in charge. Before Ford Ord in Monterey County was closed down and turned into a university, 'control burn' warnings were a joke in the community for 'fire blazing free at Ft. Ord. They would use a 'control burn that jumped the line' to clear land or explode lost unexploded ordinance frequently to save $ and effort. They also frequently sent out derps with egos/I.Q.s that were basically "here. Hold my beer." level.
 
2022-01-19 10:06:43 PM  

UberDave: I would be interested to see how that got away from them.  That area *is* on the "drier" side of the Piney forests - out in East Texas controlled burns work well because of the moisture in the soil and humidity.



As I live in the area, I can tell you exactly what happened. Stupidity.

We had a good breeze the previous night that increased to pretty windy right before dawn. Those winds continued throughout the day with pretty strong gusts. They started the fire anyway in high wind conditions when we are already extremely dry.

It was irresponsible as fark.
 
2022-01-19 10:08:25 PM  

Snarky Acronym: Broke my heart when that happened. I used to drive from Austin to the little park road that connects the two state parks there and back just to get away for a bit. Was devastated to see what was left of the forest after that fire.



Park Road 1A. It was a gorgeous drive in a convertible in mid-Fall when the weather turned cooler. A lot of the undergrowth has come back but there are places where it still somewhat resembles a burned out moonscape.
 
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