Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.
Duplicate of another approved link: 12049949


(Ars Technica)   2022 is the year of Linux on...your phone   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, Linux, Mobile phone, ARM architecture, big chip companies, back cover pops, microSD slot, launch of the original PinePhone, pogo pins  
•       •       •

187 clicks;  Favorite

12 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-19 10:07:21 AM  
Android is my favorite Linux distro.
 
2022-01-19 10:11:08 AM  
So how do I put a real OS on it like any BSD?

/I've got one on order
 
2022-01-19 11:31:52 AM  
I got a Pinephone last year but Verizon refused to activate the sim card. Then someone broke in and stole it. I figured I was trying too hard and gave up for now.
 
2022-01-19 11:55:17 AM  

Joe USer: Android is my favorite Linux distro.


I vaguely remember that Linus basically said the same thing.  Because they got the application publishing model taken care of.

Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.

While hard core admin types (and I include myself in that pile) like the insane level of customization Linux gives... yeah nobody else gives a shiat, and in fact because a great deal of that is not "optional" represents an impossible learning curve to climb.

/cue other Linux nerds who will attempt to say otherwise, and in the process prove my point
//Love me some embedded Linux systems - 'cause I can lock 'em down and create a BDSM user environment (where the user is always wrong).
 
2022-01-19 12:02:22 PM  

Stephen_Falken: I got a Pinephone last year but Verizon refused to activate the sim card. Then someone broke in and stole it. I figured I was trying too hard and gave up for now.


Bummer man - it has all the right LTE bands, but looks like it might use a non-standard VoLTE client - in 11 months there will be no more 3G circuit-switched voice/data services on the big 3 operators in the US...

Like most things linux, no out of the box support for leading edge tech (4G/5G/VoLTE/VoNR) without a bunch of klugey patches and configs is a bad thing from the consumer adoption perspective...

/ if an operator doesn't sell a phone model on their portal and it's not an Apple or Samsung, I'd be really cautious in plunking down any cash on the phone
 
2022-01-19 12:11:09 PM  

MadHatter500: Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.


As a semi-recent Linux convert (in the last six months or so), I couldn't agree more.  On the one hand, every time I've needed to find how to do something, I've always found it.  On the other hand, it's usually in the form of "Simple, open a terminal window and type this long, cryptic command."

No.  Really, no.  Make it doable from within the GUI.  And I say that as someone who started using computers when DOS 3.3 was state of the art, and even now I spend a good chunk of my work day in a Windows 10 command prompt because, for many things, I just find it easier to do.
 
2022-01-19 12:13:33 PM  

MadHatter500: Joe USer: Android is my favorite Linux distro.

I vaguely remember that Linus basically said the same thing.  Because they got the application publishing model taken care of.

Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.

While hard core admin types (and I include myself in that pile) like the insane level of customization Linux gives... yeah nobody else gives a shiat, and in fact because a great deal of that is not "optional" represents an impossible learning curve to climb.

/cue other Linux nerds who will attempt to say otherwise, and in the process prove my point
//Love me some embedded Linux systems - 'cause I can lock 'em down and create a BDSM user environment (where the user is always wrong).


I'm an old school PC builder, been building PC's from parts since x286 chips were the latest and greatest. But since I'm a gamer I've stayed within Windows (I also just don't like using Mac OS in general). The last couple years I've been playing footsie with Linux, installing and messing around with some Linux derived environments - an Unraid server and a bunch of Raspberry Pi's I'm using for different things. The experience has been both rewarding and challenging.

When you know what you're doing in a Linux environment it's like being a wizard. I'm still amazed that you can perform some complex stuff so easily in the CLI. Want to install a new program? Might just be able to type a few magic words into the CLI and VIOLA! There you go.

But it's just as frustrating for those of us new to the environment, and many things which are supposed to be straightforward don't actually end up being that way in your particular use case. And to get Linux version of a program to work you might need some obscure bit of code some volunteer posted somewhere to the internet - if you can figure out that's what you need. And while the CLI is a powerful interface for those with the skills to use it.... I farking HAAAAAATE using a CLI. Give me a decent GUI any day over the CLI.
 
2022-01-19 12:26:14 PM  

The Weekend Baker: As a semi-recent Linux convert (in the last six months or so), I couldn't agree more.  On the one hand, every time I've needed to find how to do something, I've always found it.  On the other hand, it's usually in the form of "Simple, open a terminal window and type this long, cryptic command."

No.  Really, no.  Make it doable from within the GUI.  And I say that as someone who started using computers when DOS 3.3 was state of the art, and even now I spend a good chunk of my work day in a Windows 10 command prompt because, for many things, I just find it easier to do.


THIS.

I started on the VIC 20/C64/Coleco ADAM and Commodore PET. My first version of DOS was 3.0.

Back in the DOS days, sure, a ton of stuff was done through command prompt. But in 2022? I have Win 10 on my machine. The number of times I've had to do something in PowerShell... I could probably count on one hand.

I'm going to try some Linux distros on some older machines we have that will never qualify for Win 11. One is a i5-3550 for example.

As someone working in the school system I worry about Win 11 rollout.

https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/18/22889184/windows-11-se-laptops-acer-asus-dell-hp-lenovo-education-schools

Sure they have Win 11 Chromebook alternatives but... we would require a budget for that. I work at an underfunded elementary school in an underfunded school district. Our desktops are Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad systems. Our laptops are Chromebooks. We don't have one single computer at my school that could jump to Win 11 if we wanted to. *sighs*
 
2022-01-19 12:27:02 PM  

MadHatter500: Joe USer: Android is my favorite Linux distro.

I vaguely remember that Linus basically said the same thing.  Because they got the application publishing model taken care of.

Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.

While hard core admin types (and I include myself in that pile) like the insane level of customization Linux gives... yeah nobody else gives a shiat, and in fact because a great deal of that is not "optional" represents an impossible learning curve to climb.

/cue other Linux nerds who will attempt to say otherwise, and in the process prove my point
//Love me some embedded Linux systems - 'cause I can lock 'em down and create a BDSM user environment (where the user is always wrong).


I guess you can claim I prove your point (because the malware hell that is Android would certainly exploit it) in that I absolutely can't stand how locked down Android is and that I can't simply wipe it and replace it with a functioning OS.

Also one of the things that really annoyed me is not finding a way to mount an ext4 (or ext2, ext3) formatted flash card.  I'm fairly sure it must have something like that for internal memory (I guess it could have f2fs, but I doubt it), and kludging FAT32 onto my flash meant any encrypted filesystem would be useless.  My current tablet supports exFAT, so it is fairly moot now, but I'd still prefer any ext filesystem to FAT.

On the other hand, my tablet's UI is really bad and could use a wipe and replacement.  Worst is the keyboard, which assumes any click on the border (which extends to the edge, so *carefully* hold it so that it doesn't "interpret" being close to the front a clicking the edge) is a return key that deletes all your input.

Sure, they are all little things.  But the little things are things that no Linux user has had to put up with since roughly 2000.  On the PC, Linux gives you freedom.  On mobile, Linux gives all the freedom to Google and your phone manufacturer or ISP.

And if there is ever a "year of the Linux desktop", I've long known what it would look like.
 
2022-01-19 12:36:50 PM  
And the thread is now redlit. :(

R.I.P. thread.
 
2022-01-19 1:00:25 PM  

The Weekend Baker: MadHatter500: Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.

As a semi-recent Linux convert (in the last six months or so), I couldn't agree more.  On the one hand, every time I've needed to find how to do something, I've always found it.  On the other hand, it's usually in the form of "Simple, open a terminal window and type this long, cryptic command."

No.  Really, no.  Make it doable from within the GUI.  And I say that as someone who started using computers when DOS 3.3 was state of the art, and even now I spend a good chunk of my work day in a Windows 10 command prompt because, for many things, I just find it easier to do.


I'm guessing you've not heard of the synaptic package manager?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synaptic_(software)

it's only been around for 20 years, so I guess I can understand
 
2022-01-19 1:52:52 PM  

petec: The Weekend Baker: MadHatter500: Much as I've disliked many things that Apple and MS have done over the years, making it possible for the "average person" to be able to install and remove applications is something both of them, plus Google, have gotten right that the rest of the Linux world can't seem to get their heads wrapped around.

As a semi-recent Linux convert (in the last six months or so), I couldn't agree more.  On the one hand, every time I've needed to find how to do something, I've always found it.  On the other hand, it's usually in the form of "Simple, open a terminal window and type this long, cryptic command."

No.  Really, no.  Make it doable from within the GUI.  And I say that as someone who started using computers when DOS 3.3 was state of the art, and even now I spend a good chunk of my work day in a Windows 10 command prompt because, for many things, I just find it easier to do.

I'm guessing you've not heard of the synaptic package manager?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synaptic_(software)

it's only been around for 20 years, so I guess I can understand


Sure have, and I've used it plenty of times.  Have a great day.
 
Displayed 12 of 12 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.