Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Popular Science)   The Army is staging a "Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft" competition and there's a reason why this headline has the Cool tag   (popsci.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Helicopter, top rotors, case of the Defiant, landing zone, new video today of their coaxial candidate, different designs, helicopter flies, aircraft level  
•       •       •

2051 clicks; posted to STEM » on 19 Jan 2022 at 8:42 AM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-19 8:43:02 AM  
Finally, it's time for Mike Sparks to shine! You all laughed at him, but he's going to be proven right!

tankandafvnews.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 9:09:43 AM  
The Defiant, showcased in a new video from Sikorsky, is pitted against one from Bell in the Army's Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft competition.

Uh, that ain't the Defiant. The Defiant had pulse phasers and a cloaking device.

/always thought it was cool that they updated the intro to include it
 
2022-01-19 9:18:36 AM  
Both of them challenge the traditional idea of what a helicopter even looks like. In one corner of the ring is a helicopter with two top rotors that spin in opposite directions, and in the other corner is an aircraft called a tiltrotor.

Kamov has been making twin coaxial rotor helicopters for seventy years, and tiltrotors (basically the V-22) have been in service for about fifteen.
 
2022-01-19 9:37:45 AM  
Airwolf Theme Song Intro
Youtube _h6VOWVymEw
 
2022-01-19 9:42:11 AM  
Oddly enough don't have any snark for this - that's cool as hell.
 
2022-01-19 9:54:51 AM  

Slypork: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/_h6VOWVymEw]


Blue Thunder - 1983 TV Serie intro
Youtube Lx_a-h9lspo
 
2022-01-19 9:58:06 AM  
No, it's Future Assault Aircraft - Long Range. The FAALR (hard A) has been in use for quite some time, living up to its name and expectations.
 
2022-01-19 10:09:00 AM  
...because we'll spend $1 trillion developing a helicopter that can be taken out by a goat herder?  Is that what the cool tag is for?
 
2022-01-19 10:24:48 AM  

FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?


Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out
 
2022-01-19 10:25:51 AM  
My school emailed the parents asking them to bring in more boxes of Kleenex because they have run out of Kleenex early and need more of them.
 
2022-01-19 10:42:10 AM  
The Russians have used coaxial counter-rotating rotor helicopters for a long time. I've long wondered why the US hasn't.

I note the Bell promo video for their titlrotor aircraft failed to show the transition to and from level flight. For those who don't remember, that transition was such a problem for most pilots in the Osprey that they lost a lot of equipment and personnel when the Osprey's fell out of the sky.

The Osprey transitions to level flight by climbing vertically very high, then dipping the nose and diving toward the ground while the rotors re-orient for level flight. To transition from level flight, the Osprey has to make a steep climb- almost to stall- and start titling the rotors back to vertical.

NOTE: None of the tiltrotor aircraft can take off or land in level flight- the rotors are too large.
 
2022-01-19 10:45:10 AM  
Why not reengineer the helis from Zero Dark Thirty?
ZERO DARK THIRTY Clip - "Area 51" (2012) Jessica Chastain
Youtube ZNvBAXPpQDQ
 
2022-01-19 11:02:12 AM  

Wenchmaster: The Russians have used coaxial counter-rotating rotor helicopters for a long time. I've long wondered why the US hasn't.

I note the Bell promo video for their titlrotor aircraft failed to show the transition to and from level flight. For those who don't remember, that transition was such a problem for most pilots in the Osprey that they lost a lot of equipment and personnel when the Osprey's fell out of the sky.

The Osprey transitions to level flight by climbing vertically very high, then dipping the nose and diving toward the ground while the rotors re-orient for level flight. To transition from level flight, the Osprey has to make a steep climb- almost to stall- and start titling the rotors back to vertical.

NOTE: None of the tiltrotor aircraft can take off or land in level flight- the rotors are too large.


Probably a mixture of mechanical complexity and lack of development by US companies.  Single rotor configurations are well understood at this point, so institutional bias likely favors the known designs.  The Kamov helicopters may be hangar queens given the added mechanical complexity, there's just more to break.

I've heard complaints about noise, but I cannot say if that's due to the rotors or the choice of engine.
 
2022-01-19 11:10:19 AM  

Wenchmaster: The Russians have used coaxial counter-rotating rotor helicopters for a long time. I've long wondered why the US hasn't.

I note the Bell promo video for their titlrotor aircraft failed to show the transition to and from level flight. For those who don't remember, that transition was such a problem for most pilots in the Osprey that they lost a lot of equipment and personnel when the Osprey's fell out of the sky.

The Osprey transitions to level flight by climbing vertically very high, then dipping the nose and diving toward the ground while the rotors re-orient for level flight. To transition from level flight, the Osprey has to make a steep climb- almost to stall- and start titling the rotors back to vertical.

NOTE: None of the tiltrotor aircraft can take off or land in level flight- the rotors are too large.


Well, they need to be super turbofans.

Fark user imageView Full Size



And add two more of them!

Fark user imageView Full Size


And they need to be jet engines!

Fark user imageView Full Size


Book it, done.
 
2022-01-19 11:20:41 AM  
Here's a pretty good discussion of tilt rotor flying
 
2022-01-19 12:13:10 PM  

WonderDave1: Slypork: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/_h6VOWVymEw]

[YouTube video: Blue Thunder - 1983 TV Serie intro]


I loved that show growing up (but I was an air force brat at the time, so we watched a lot of shows like that)

I think I was only about 3 or 4 years ago when I caught it on MeTV or one of those other nostalgic over the air TV channels, and realized it was Dana Carvey as their tech support guy
 
2022-01-19 12:20:26 PM  

FLMountainMan: ...because we'll spend $1 trillion developing a helicopter that can be taken out by a goat herder?  Is that what the cool tag is for?


We don't need goat herders.

Our VTOL aircraft are perfectly capable of falling apart without any outside help

https://www.stripes.com/theaters/asia_pacific/2021-08-16/marine-corps-osprey-okinawa-fallen-part-tamaki-2569318.html
 
2022-01-19 12:52:03 PM  

johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?

Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out


I think it's pretty bigoted that you assign goat herding to a particular nationality or race.
 
2022-01-19 12:53:06 PM  
IMHO, I would think the rotating rotor mechanism utilized by the osprey and V-280, would be a point of failure that would come with significant risk if landing in a hot LZ.  Don't osprey typically land far enough away from the combat zone, drop off troops and let them walk the rest of the way.

Also, serious question, can someone explain the benefit(s) of a dual top rotor?  More/faster lift and maneuverability?
 
2022-01-19 1:08:53 PM  

sid244: Also, serious question, can someone explain the benefit(s) of a dual top rotor?  More/faster lift and maneuverability?


Having a single rotor spinning in one direction also creates an equal and opposite torque/spin on the fuselage in the opposite direction.  That's why conventional helicopters have tail rotors, to counter act that.

By having two rotors spinning in opposite directions the individual torques cancel each other out.  Thus the tail rotor can be replaced by something useful, like a pusher prop for increased speed.

BTW, Back in the 80s, I had a boss at Lockheed that worked on their first helicopter project back in the late 60s, the Cheyenne. Note that since it only had one main rotor, it still needed a tail rotor, but also had a pusher.  It could do loops.

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 1:28:46 PM  
V-22 ease of transition to the new tilt-rotor?  If it's a 90 day course many dollars will be saved.
 
2022-01-19 1:38:21 PM  

imashark: Wenchmaster: The Russians have used coaxial counter-rotating rotor helicopters for a long time. I've long wondered why the US hasn't.

I note the Bell promo video for their titlrotor aircraft failed to show the transition to and from level flight. For those who don't remember, that transition was such a problem for most pilots in the Osprey that they lost a lot of equipment and personnel when the Osprey's fell out of the sky.

The Osprey transitions to level flight by climbing vertically very high, then dipping the nose and diving toward the ground while the rotors re-orient for level flight. To transition from level flight, the Osprey has to make a steep climb- almost to stall- and start titling the rotors back to vertical.

NOTE: None of the tiltrotor aircraft can take off or land in level flight- the rotors are too large.

Well, they need to be super turbofans.

[Fark user image 172x174]


And add two more of them!

[Fark user image 173x174]

And they need to be jet engines!

[Fark user image 268x181]

Book it, done.


Orcas, Orcas everywhere!
 
2022-01-19 1:38:34 PM  
We're gonna need a bigger chopper.

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 1:59:23 PM  

FLMountainMan: johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?

Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out

I think it's pretty bigoted that you assign goat herding to a particular nationality or race.


i.kinja-img.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 2:11:08 PM  

johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?

Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out

I think it's pretty bigoted that you assign goat herding to a particular nationality or race.

[i.kinja-img.com image 663x372]


You're old, I get it.

But really, we're going to spend hundreds of millions of dollars building this and any low-skill combatant with an RPG or drone will likely be able to take it down.
 
2022-01-19 2:30:22 PM  

FLMountainMan: johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?

Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out

I think it's pretty bigoted that you assign goat herding to a particular nationality or race.

[i.kinja-img.com image 663x372]

You're old, I get it.

But really, we're going to spend hundreds of millions of dollars building this and any low-skill combatant with an RPG or drone will likely be able to take it down.


Yes, a relatively slow moving, low flying rotary aircraft can be brought down by ground fire.  So that's your reasoning to not have any at all?
How many have been shot down compared to how many missions were  flown?
Honestly, I wouldn't be surprised if more were list due to pilot error or mechanical failure.
 
2022-01-19 2:53:40 PM  

2wolves: V-22 ease of transition to the new tilt-rotor?  If it's a 90 day course many dollars will be saved.


This is a Blackhawk replacement. There are very few V-22 pilots compared to Blackhawk drivers.

Per wikipedia - number built
V-22 = 400
Blackhawk = 4,000
 
2022-01-19 4:48:12 PM  

vestona22: sid244: Also, serious question, can someone explain the benefit(s) of a dual top rotor?  More/faster lift and maneuverability?

Having a single rotor spinning in one direction also creates an equal and opposite torque/spin on the fuselage in the opposite direction.  That's why conventional helicopters have tail rotors, to counter act that.

By having two rotors spinning in opposite directions the individual torques cancel each other out.  Thus the tail rotor can be replaced by something useful, like a pusher prop for increased speed.

BTW, Back in the 80s, I had a boss at Lockheed that worked on their first helicopter project back in the late 60s, the Cheyenne. Note that since it only had one main rotor, it still needed a tail rotor, but also had a pusher.  It could do loops.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 800x554]


That makes total sense.  Thank you!
 
2022-01-19 5:56:54 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

It would be handy to have a few Defiants.


WonderDave1: Slypork: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/_h6VOWVymEw]

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/Lx_a-h9lspo]


That was an amazing drop-off from movie to tv series. I mean, that show was just awful.
But they did manage to stretch the chopper footage from the movie and what little bit they could afford to shoot on their own into a full season. Or two. Can't remember. I think it was at least two. I remember they started talking about how Blue Thunder could suddenly hit Mach 1 after Airwolf's first season. Couldn't go into orbit, though.


Slypork: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/_h6VOWVymEw]


That was a great looking aircraft. I guess it crashed in the early 90s.


I thought the old Sikorsky S-hook was one of the favorites of JASOC because they can carry large payloads, are incredibly stout and evidentially fast as hell. And leaked fuel everywhere.
 
2022-01-19 8:22:01 PM  
In one corner of the ring is a helicopter with two top rotors that spin in opposite directions,

So - what the soviets were doing decades ago?
 
2022-01-19 9:18:25 PM  

FLMountainMan: johnny_vegas: FLMountainMan: ... a goat herder?

Well, that's a bigoted comment.

/location AND username check out

I think it's pretty bigoted that you assign goat herding to a particular nationality or race.


I assign it to hot short haired women and Muppets.

Muppets - Julie Andrews - The Lonely Goatherd
Youtube fW1gMVw_LtI
 
2022-01-20 12:38:35 PM  

Meat's dream: My school emailed the parents asking them to bring in more boxes of Kleenex because they have run out of Kleenex early and need more of them.


How far could we have come if the military was forced to fundraise for itself?  Like each regional military base had to support itself from the local community's resources! It would have been a utopia, with so much funding left for scientific advancement and a basic minimum social safety net.
I envision a group of highly fortified garrisons, led by local commanders, routinely gathering resources from the local community just like a school. And as each garrison grows in strength, it can recruit people from surrounding territory to increase its resource base and militant capabilities.

/oh wait thats fuedalism
//deliberately obtuse, of course we shouldn't fund military like we do schools, we should fund schools like we do the military. A soldier in Alaska and one in Missouri and one in New York all have the same high tech night vision, why cant students from the same states have equivalent education funding.
///I want to see a bake sale to fund the next F35 that rolls off the line...
But if we did fund the military like we do schools, I would be a powerful warlord. And in my fiefdom,  we would have great schools.
////Bearkiller A-lister students get straight As
 
Displayed 32 of 32 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.