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(BBC-US)   US airlines warn of impending Covid vaccine flight disruptions   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Delta Air Lines, Los Angeles International Airport, United Airlines, Airline, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Airlines, American Airlines, chief executives of American Airlines  
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658 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Jan 2022 at 10:50 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
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2022-01-18 9:30:05 AM  
The airplane manufacturers say this isn't safe. The airlines say this isn't safe. The FAA says it isn't safe. So, of course, in the era of "Dr. Fauci is just an opinionated quack," we'll get all kinds of internet experts telling us not to worry, it'll be fine. Ignoring expertise is the biggest epidemic this country faces.

Things will be fine because the FAA will put out restrictions so the hazards are avoided. Said restrictions will mean delays and cost the airlines (and you) money, but at least you'll have a good cell signal to play games while you wait.
 
2022-01-18 9:47:36 AM  
"A delay will cause real harm. Pushing back deployment one year would subtract $50bn in economic growth, just as our nation recovers and rebuilds from the pandemic," said CTIA chief executive Meredith Attwell Baker in a blog post in November.

oh no. That will have such an impact on a $20 trillions GDP.
 
2022-01-18 11:02:29 AM  
why not just turn them off and then back on again for each plane that lands?

/not to be taken seriously
//odds on a congressperson suggesting it are high though.
GGGGG
 
2022-01-18 11:59:28 AM  
If only the airlines and the FAA could have foreseen this and taken action before now........
 
2022-01-18 12:57:13 PM  

jack_o_the_hills: If only the airlines and the FAA could have foreseen this and taken action before now........


They have been warning about this for a very long time. Verizon, AT&T and TMobile have fought them tooth and nail.

When a plane crashes (a very real possibility if you take the time to read what the worry is) you can feel good that you have great ping times in Fortnite.
 
2022-01-18 1:35:24 PM  
As much as I realize cellphones have turned into a necessity for most folks, I despise them more now than I did before I finally caved in and bought one.

/and I didn't really "buy" it
//it was given to me at no cost by Mrs. Mel's firm
///I still despise how most people are glued to them all the time
 
2022-01-18 2:51:33 PM  

zgrizz: jack_o_the_hills: If only the airlines and the FAA could have foreseen this and taken action before now........

They have been warning about this for a very long time. Verizon, AT&T and TMobile have fought them tooth and nail.

When a plane crashes (a very real possibility if you take the time to read what the worry is) you can feel good that you have great ping times in Fortnite.


You do know the FAA, when asked back as far back as 2012, and again in 2017, if these frequencies would cause issues, gave guidance that there would not be a problem, and the airlines and the others at the FFA who I guess thought there was a problem chose to do nothing, because it would cut into the stock buyback money of the airlines, right?  40 other countries have rolled out 5G C band near airports and there have been no aircraft issues- even with good ol' US American based aircraft flying in and out of those countries. Some countries, like Japan, operate at frequencies much closer together than what we use here in the USA. No issues. The FFA even admitted in November that no proven issues have ever been reported by aircraft operating where the frequencies in question are coming of equipment/towers near any airport. This is nothing but a regulatory power grab attempt in a political war between the FAA and FCC that's been going on for over a decade. No planes are going to crash over this, calm down.
 
2022-01-18 5:37:17 PM  

jack_o_the_hills: zgrizz: jack_o_the_hills: If only the airlines and the FAA could have foreseen this and taken action before now........

They have been warning about this for a very long time. Verizon, AT&T and TMobile have fought them tooth and nail.

When a plane crashes (a very real possibility if you take the time to read what the worry is) you can feel good that you have great ping times in Fortnite.

You do know the FAA, when asked back as far back as 2012, and again in 2017, if these frequencies would cause issues, gave guidance that there would not be a problem, and the airlines and the others at the FFA who I guess thought there was a problem chose to do nothing, because it would cut into the stock buyback money of the airlines, right?  40 other countries have rolled out 5G C band near airports and there have been no aircraft issues- even with good ol' US American based aircraft flying in and out of those countries. Some countries, like Japan, operate at frequencies much closer together than what we use here in the USA. No issues. The FFA even admitted in November that no proven issues have ever been reported by aircraft operating where the frequencies in question are coming of equipment/towers near any airport. This is nothing but a regulatory power grab attempt in a political war between the FAA and FCC that's been going on for over a decade. No planes are going to crash over this, calm down.


That's because if you read between the lines what the airlines are saying is they have some old planes that might not tolerate the signal and they don't want to spend the money to fix it.
 
2022-01-18 6:34:54 PM  
The airlines are correct.  All the countries that installed 5G towers have had...let me check...oh, zero issues with the exact same plane models.
 
2022-01-18 7:08:43 PM  

jack_o_the_hills: zgrizz: jack_o_the_hills: If only the airlines and the FAA could have foreseen this and taken action before now........

They have been warning about this for a very long time. Verizon, AT&T and TMobile have fought them tooth and nail.

When a plane crashes (a very real possibility if you take the time to read what the worry is) you can feel good that you have great ping times in Fortnite.

You do know the FAA, when asked back as far back as 2012, and again in 2017, if these frequencies would cause issues, gave guidance that there would not be a problem, and the airlines and the others at the FFA who I guess thought there was a problem chose to do nothing, because it would cut into the stock buyback money of the airlines, right?  40 other countries have rolled out 5G C band near airports and there have been no aircraft issues- even with good ol' US American based aircraft flying in and out of those countries. Some countries, like Japan, operate at frequencies much closer together than what we use here in the USA. No issues. The FFA even admitted in November that no proven issues have ever been reported by aircraft operating where the frequencies in question are coming of equipment/towers near any airport. This is nothing but a regulatory power grab attempt in a political war between the FAA and FCC that's been going on for over a decade. No planes are going to crash over this, calm down.


We don't look to other countries to see what the results of our action or inaction might be.  That's preposterous - comparing foreign denizens to Americans just doesn't work because we're different, chosen by God as his light bearer on earth.  Next thing you'll suggest is we use other nations national health insurance models as an example.*

If the two largest airplane manufacturers are linking arms, this is about saving money, full stop.

/*Germany's system of would actually be a good model for how the U.S. system could evolve - choice of public or private, shared costs between employer and employee, safety net for the poor, opt out and pay for private services for the wealthy.  There are a variety of models (single payer, multi-payer, Bismarck, Beveridge, or the HSA with catastrophic insurance model used in SIngapore).
//but this is an airplane thread
///so I'll stop the threadjack
 
2022-01-18 7:49:05 PM  
The airlines appear to have won, at least for now.

It's interesting that the protections given in other countries are far greater than the ones we will be getting in the US. For example, 90 seconds in France vs 20 in the US. We will see how this goes.

Flying a 7 1/2 hour flight tonight that lands at 8:30am. Gonna be real shiatty if that signal messes with the plane when we are landing. It's a training flight for me, but there will be 214 passengers on board. I'm sure it will be fine, but the potential for it is an added layer of stress that I could live without right now.
 
2022-01-19 6:05:12 AM  
So the FAA has stepped in and checked about 45% of the commercial fleets already and hasn't grounded a single plane? Yeah, me thinks this story is a bunch of hogwash to justify why they "have to" cancel your flight to Omaha.
 
2022-01-19 11:52:31 AM  

MelGoesOnTour: As much as I realize cellphones have turned into a necessity for most folks, I despise them more now than I did before I finally caved in and bought one.

/and I didn't really "buy" it
//it was given to me at no cost by Mrs. Mel's firm
///I still despise how most people are glued to them all the time


But what are the people doing on their phones that should make you despise them?  You are probably aware that there is a LOT of different functions a phone provides.  Do you despise people checking their email on a PC?  Or the weather on a PC?  Or getting directions, sports scores or plane arrivals?  If those are "acceptable" actions to you on a PC, why not on a phone?  Why should a person notdo those things if it assists them in their daily life?
 
2022-01-19 1:07:13 PM  

Lodger: Why should a person notdo those things if it assists them in their daily life?


Because a lot of those things are things out in public that no one ever did pre-cellphone, I guess. Sitting in an airport checking the weather, et al, is one thing but sitting at a red light reading email and not moving when the light turns green is another. I'm also aware that, ironically, phones are hardly used as phones...and I realize that's beside the point.
However, in this particular case, it'll interesting to see if the airlines are correct about their suspicions/worries or if it'll take a major accident to bring this issue to light.
 
2022-01-19 1:44:14 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: Lodger: Why should a person not do those things if it assists them in their daily life?

Because a lot of those things are things out in public that no one ever did pre-cellphone, I guess. Sitting in an airport checking the weather, et al, is one thing but sitting at a red light reading email and not moving when the light turns green is another. I'm also aware that, ironically, phones are hardly used as phones...and I realize that's beside the point.
However, in this particular case, it'll interesting to see if the airlines are correct about their suspicions/worries or if it'll take a major accident to bring this issue to light.


People have been doing lots - lots -of things while driving long before cellphones were invented.  Remove cellphones, and you still have people reading books, doing make-up, hell, playing drums or even changing clothes.  People have always multi-tasked, that isn't going to stop for better or worse.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-19 2:16:05 PM  

Lodger: MelGoesOnTour: Lodger: Why should a person not do those things if it assists them in their daily life?

Because a lot of those things are things out in public that no one ever did pre-cellphone, I guess. Sitting in an airport checking the weather, et al, is one thing but sitting at a red light reading email and not moving when the light turns green is another. I'm also aware that, ironically, phones are hardly used as phones...and I realize that's beside the point.
However, in this particular case, it'll interesting to see if the airlines are correct about their suspicions/worries or if it'll take a major accident to bring this issue to light.

People have been doing lots - lots -of things while driving long before cellphones were invented.  Remove cellphones, and you still have people reading books, doing make-up, hell, playing drums or even changing clothes.  People have always multi-tasked, that isn't going to stop for better or worse.

[Fark user image 425x254]


Good points and true. However, the extent to how common multi-tasking was, say, 30 years ago is significantly less than it is today. A simple reason why this may be true is that it's easier to multitask in the present day. indeed, like you, I sure don't expect it to stop. However, there are costs and I wonder what that cost might wind up being.
 
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