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(NBC News)   Annoying: your cruise gets cancelled due to Covid. Much worse: your cruise gets cancelled due to Covid AFTER it embarks and you are trapped at sea for two weeks   (nbcnews.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Meyer Werft, Norwegian Cruise Line, Cruise ship, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., Norwegian Gem, Norwegian Jewel, Cruise, Caribbean trip  
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2224 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2022 at 5:30 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2022-01-17 5:33:09 AM  
That's not how cancelation works.
 
2022-01-17 5:39:19 AM  
Ummmm.....that means they had a two week cruise.

Which is standard length

Wtf are you on subby?
 
2022-01-17 5:39:24 AM  
Again
 
2022-01-17 5:45:03 AM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2022-01-17 5:45:31 AM  
Maybe people should stop being douchebags and wait till the pandemic is over?
 
2022-01-17 5:52:13 AM  
Yes. Going on a cruise after the past year is always gonna be a cruise on De Nile. I wonder if they all voted for F. E. Leopard, too.
 
2022-01-17 5:56:23 AM  
Don't see the problem.
 
2022-01-17 5:59:05 AM  
From the studio that brought you "The Love Boat", 2022 is proud to present:

The Dumb Boat
 
2022-01-17 6:06:43 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size

STOP GOING ON CRUISES ASSHOLES!!!
 
2022-01-17 6:16:15 AM  
I joked with my parents that I would never go on a cruise because they were prone to norovirus.

Who the hecken fark goes on a cruise while the covid pandemic is still a thing?

/even without disease you couldn't get me stuck on a boat like that
 
2022-01-17 6:19:00 AM  
Even much worserer: your cruise gets cancelled due to Covid AFTER it embarks and you are dumped in the sea
 
2022-01-17 6:25:01 AM  
FTFA: "... we will be stuck inside. With limited shows, small crowds, and nothing to do..."

Well, one person's tragedy is another person's go-fark-yourself
 
2022-01-17 6:27:34 AM  
Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute
 
2022-01-17 6:30:05 AM  
Call the Guy: "...and nothing to do..."

I suppose they could sit and think about how they got into this situation in the first place, but then again, that might not be an option for them.
 
2022-01-17 6:44:24 AM  
Look, kids. It's a cruise ship.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-17 6:47:31 AM  
Mega-worse: A bad case of norvo also ensues on board.
 
2022-01-17 7:02:42 AM  
At least it wasn't a 3-hour tour...a 3-hour tour....
 
2022-01-17 7:03:44 AM  

born_yesterday: That's not how cancelation works.


It is for the cruise industry which has TOS that would make a software lawyer blush
 
2022-01-17 7:04:02 AM  

berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute


I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.
 
2022-01-17 7:05:06 AM  

Call the Guy: FTFA: "... we will be stuck inside. With limited shows, small crowds, and nothing to do..."

Well, one person's tragedy is another person's go-fark-yourself


Have a heart! Limited shows! They're going to be so bored! What, you actually expect them to interact with their children and/or spouse?
 
2022-01-17 7:05:10 AM  
Did you remember to sign your will before departing?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-17 7:06:28 AM  

solokumba: Maybe people should stop being douchebags and wait till the pandemic is over?


Will the pandemic ever be over?

It seems like at this point, it's going to be the new normal.
 
2022-01-17 7:07:59 AM  

dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.


It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism
 
2022-01-17 7:10:22 AM  

Thunderboy: Call the Guy: "...and nothing to do..."

I suppose they could sit and think about how they got into this situation in the first place, but then again, that might not be an option for them.


I think I could find a way to occupy my time...

Fark user imageView Full Size


Celestial navigation is kind of fun.  The math isn't particularly hard, it's just adding and subtracting, at least for a noon sight.
 
2022-01-17 7:13:28 AM  
By "trapped at sea" do you mean "on a two-week cruise"?
 
2022-01-17 7:13:56 AM  

TeddyRooseveltsMustache: From the studio that brought you "The Love Boat", 2022 is proud to present:
The Dumb Boat


You can't stop it!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-17 7:14:14 AM  

anuran: dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.

It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism


That's just it:  it's *NOT* capitalism.  It's more like socialism.  It's a government safety net.  That distorts the market.

In pure capitalism, government wouldn't give a fark.   You screw up?  You're on your own.
 
2022-01-17 7:30:02 AM  
I don't know how anyone could have predicted this.
 
2022-01-17 7:30:49 AM  
The SLEZEs and our pod family actually had a Disney cruise booked for Oct 2020 but cancelled after the pandemic hit.  We again booked for this upcoming August but, for the money it was going to cost and the potential for restrictions (wear a mask everywhere, outbreaks, restrictions on cast member interactions, etc.), we reluctantly cancelled again.

Cruising is an AWESOME vacation.  Food is OK and plentiful.  Activities are fun.  Port visits are great.  Shows are great.  But it is expensive and there are annoying things too (state rooms are smaller than hotel rooms, it is crowded, it is expensive).  We won't go back on a cruise until the amenities return to pre-covid days.  That may mean that we never actually go on a Disney cruise (if the kids age out of wanting to hug Mickey/Cinderella).

People going on these cruises are either cruise junkies or deluding themselves.
 
2022-01-17 7:32:12 AM  

dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.

It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism

That's just it:  it's *NOT* capitalism.  It's more like socialism.  It's a government safety net.  That distorts the market.

In pure capitalism, government wouldn't give a fark.   You screw up?  You're on your own.


Nope. It's capitalism just how it was from the beginning. An economic system in which returns are tilted towards capital, everything can be bought and sold freely including government, minimal oversight and regulation, labor forced to work for a "natural wage" with little or no influence. Returns to capital as the only legitimate end to economic avtivity. So on, so forth.
 
2022-01-17 7:35:51 AM  

anuran: dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.

It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism

That's just it:  it's *NOT* capitalism.  It's more like socialism.  It's a government safety net.  That distorts the market.

In pure capitalism, government wouldn't give a fark.   You screw up?  You're on your own.

Nope. It's capitalism just how it was from the beginning. An economic system in which returns are tilted towards capital, everything can be bought and sold freely including government, minimal oversight and regulation, labor forced to work for a "natural wage" with little or no influence. Returns to capital as the only legitimate end to economic avtivity. So on, so forth.


"Minimal oversight and regulation" = no bailouts.
 
2022-01-17 7:41:54 AM  
The conditional sail order from the CDC is probably going to not be renewed when it expires this month because of the Covid cases. They were granted the conditional sail order provided 95%+ of passengers were vaccinated and there was a rigorous testing procedure of everyone before boarding (among other things).

What we have seen is that vaccination and testing are not as effective against omicron as it was against Delta, so we are seeing multiple-times-more cases now on cruise ships than we saw last year.

End result, no more cruising until we can find a way to effectively manage omicron or live with endemic spread among the vaccinated.
 
2022-01-17 7:53:00 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Again


It's like the third time. Must be a lot of people stuck at sea.
 
2022-01-17 7:53:27 AM  

sleze: The SLEZEs and our pod family actually had a Disney cruise booked for Oct 2020 but cancelled after the pandemic hit.  We again booked for this upcoming August but, for the money it was going to cost and the potential for restrictions (wear a mask everywhere, outbreaks, restrictions on cast member interactions, etc.), we reluctantly cancelled again.

Cruising is an AWESOME vacation.  Food is OK and plentiful.  Activities are fun.  Port visits are great.  Shows are great.  But it is expensive and there are annoying things too (state rooms are smaller than hotel rooms, it is crowded, it is expensive).  We won't go back on a cruise until the amenities return to pre-covid days.  That may mean that we never actually go on a Disney cruise (if the kids age out of wanting to hug Mickey/Cinderella).

People going on these cruises are either cruise junkies or deluding themselves.


Togawoman and myself went on a Disney cruise in September 2021 for our 10-year-anniversary. We go on a Disney cruise every year or two, but have been on one of the cheap ones a couple of times, too.  Of all of the cruises we've done, this was by far the best one:

- Cleanest ship we've seen. Disney is far and above cleaner and better maintained than the other fleets, but they had strict and visible sanitation procedures.
- Social distancing - 25% capacity, masking indoors at all times, distanced seating at dinner and shows. Nothing was ever crowded and two days at the private island instead of Nassau meant that it was also very private. We could go a long time on the ship and had most of an afternoon on Castaway Cay where we didn't see anyone at all.
- Strict rules enforcement - Some of the entitled masses got pissy about being told they couldn't run wild and be assholes the whole time and the kids areas were pretty much closed, so the people on there trip really wanted to be there. Everyone was well behaved and had a general good time.

Would I go on one now that we know omicron acts differently, not necessarily. Delta was a known enemy with known effective management tools. Omicron is able to evade them much easier, so until we get as a society to a general level of acceptance, no more cruising.

But hey, I have Covid for the third time right now - each time after I was vaccinated and I am masked in public outside my house. But it's never been more than a sore throat and congestion.
 
2022-01-17 7:55:38 AM  
I'm booked on a two week a cruise to four Scandinavian countries and Russia for May. Covid took out my 30th wedding anniversary cruise in 2019. Both my wife and I are triple vaccinated, at one point you need to live your life before it's over. A suite with a balcony is always the way to go.
/have been all over the world except Russia and Australia, will try Australia next when formally retired.
 
2022-01-17 8:00:40 AM  
That's what you get for going on a cruise.  Eww.
 
2022-01-17 8:08:44 AM  
FTFA: ".. limited shows, small crowds, and nothing to do..."

Have these people never been on a cruise before?
 
2022-01-17 8:13:09 AM  

dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.

It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism

That's just it:  it's *NOT* capitalism.  It's more like socialism.  It's a government safety net.  That distorts the market.

In pure capitalism, government wouldn't give a fark.   You screw up?  You're on your own.

Nope. It's capitalism just how it was from the beginning. An economic system in which returns are tilted towards capital, everything can be bought and sold freely including government, minimal oversight and regulation, labor forced to work for a "natural wage" with little or no influence. Returns to capital as the only legitimate end to economic avtivity. So on, so forth.

"Minimal oversight and regulation" = no bailouts.


Nope.

Ultimate goal of capitalism is to own the government. So, they get to protect themselves while farking the working man.

You've been lied to, grandpa.
 
2022-01-17 8:14:00 AM  

sleze: The SLEZEs and our pod family actually had a Disney cruise booked for Oct 2020 but cancelled after the pandemic hit.  We again booked for this upcoming August but, for the money it was going to cost and the potential for restrictions (wear a mask everywhere, outbreaks, restrictions on cast member interactions, etc.), we reluctantly cancelled again.

Cruising is an AWESOME vacation.  Food is OK and plentiful.  Activities are fun.  Port visits are great.  Shows are great.  But it is expensive and there are annoying things too (state rooms are smaller than hotel rooms, it is crowded, it is expensive).  We won't go back on a cruise until the amenities return to pre-covid days.  That may mean that we never actually go on a Disney cruise (if the kids age out of wanting to hug Mickey/Cinderella).

People going on these cruises are either cruise junkies or deluding themselves.


Anyone who thinks a cruise is a great vacation must be a masochist.
 
2022-01-17 8:40:27 AM  
You know what other cruise was cancelled halfway across the Atlantic?
 
2022-01-17 8:53:07 AM  
I thought the whole point of a cruise was that you were traveling around on this giant floating theme park for a couple of weeks? How is "trapped aboard for two weeks until we get home" in any way a problem?

What, because the passengers are bored now and want to go to france instead?
 
2022-01-17 9:10:50 AM  

sniderman: Mega-worse: A bad case of norvo also ensues on board.


How would a bunch more evil, stupid c*nts dying be "Mega worse"?
How about "Mega-biatchin'" ?
 
2022-01-17 9:29:25 AM  

dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: anuran: dittybopper: berylman: Remember when the cruise industry was clamoring to be included in the 2020 Covid relief CARES act with some ostentatious claim reminiscent of being "too big to fail?". That was cute

I hate the concept of "too big to fail".

The reason?  It encourages risky behavior on the part of companies that believe they are "too big to fail", meaning if they really Fark up badly, they expect the government to bail them out.  This distorts what companies view as acceptable risks.  Something that they wouldn't do if it looked like it could tank the company if things went badly looks feasible if they know that Uncle Sam will protect them financially.

That's a very bad way to run a business, at least as an ongoing concern.

It would be better if government had a policy of "You Fark up, that's your problem", and followed through with that no matter the consequences.  You would very quickly see businesses become a whole lot more fiscally conservative in their affairs.

It means they will tend towards speculation, poor risk assessment, ignore externalities, and treat the law as a joke. Welcome to the late 20th century and onwards. Yay capitalism

That's just it:  it's *NOT* capitalism.  It's more like socialism.  It's a government safety net.  That distorts the market.

In pure capitalism, government wouldn't give a fark.   You screw up?  You're on your own.

Nope. It's capitalism just how it was from the beginning. An economic system in which returns are tilted towards capital, everything can be bought and sold freely including government, minimal oversight and regulation, labor forced to work for a "natural wage" with little or no influence. Returns to capital as the only legitimate end to economic avtivity. So on, so forth.

"Minimal oversight and regulation" = no bailouts.


False. Minimal oversight and regulation just means you have no recourse when they blackmail entire communities to get political concessions. You think your supply chain problems are bad now? Wait until a company with an uncontested freight monopoly embargoes your city for failing to pass a tax cut.

Broadly speaking, the fine line between lobbying and outright bribery is defined purely by regulations on lobbyists. The weaker those regulations, the thinner the line.
 
2022-01-17 9:30:17 AM  
While premium cross Atlantic travel got the record down to a less than four day or so crossing on a country's flag ship like the USS United States, Queen Mary, for real people it was about two weeks with no TV, some movies, usually no pool.    The ships had libraries, bars, and deck chairs.

I'd suggest that Norwegian fly in a planeload of psychiatrists to discover why all those people signed up during a world plague.

The Therapy Cruise for Aristocrats.
 
2022-01-17 9:34:32 AM  

abhorrent1: drjekel_mrhyde: Again

It's like the third time. Must be a lot of people stuck at sea.


Maybe we need to organize some RWNJ Cruises
 
2022-01-17 9:54:19 AM  

CokeBear: You know what other cruise was cancelled halfway across the Atlantic?


The MS St. Louis?

The Lusitania?
 
2022-01-17 9:57:15 AM  
Huh. Cruising still remains a poor idea. Neat!
 
2022-01-17 10:03:45 AM  

FormlessOne: Huh. Cruising still remains a poor idea. Neat!


With the rise of Grindr and Lex cruising is pretty much obsolete.
 
2022-01-17 10:12:12 AM  

whosits_112: sleze: The SLEZEs and our pod family actually had a Disney cruise booked for Oct 2020 but cancelled after the pandemic hit.  We again booked for this upcoming August but, for the money it was going to cost and the potential for restrictions (wear a mask everywhere, outbreaks, restrictions on cast member interactions, etc.), we reluctantly cancelled again.

Cruising is an AWESOME vacation.  Food is OK and plentiful.  Activities are fun.  Port visits are great.  Shows are great.  But it is expensive and there are annoying things too (state rooms are smaller than hotel rooms, it is crowded, it is expensive).  We won't go back on a cruise until the amenities return to pre-covid days.  That may mean that we never actually go on a Disney cruise (if the kids age out of wanting to hug Mickey/Cinderella).

People going on these cruises are either cruise junkies or deluding themselves.

Anyone who thinks a cruise is a great vacation must be a masochist.


I can highly recommend it for the Alaskan coast.

I mean, one potential way to see and visit those little towns is to drive the 25 hours between towns, eating trail mix and staying in a camper.
Another is to have a boat bring you
 
2022-01-17 10:25:38 AM  

lifeslammer: Ummmm.....that means they had a two week cruise.

Which is standard length

Wtf are you on subby?


With absolutely no ports of call.   Peple tend to like to Cruise TO somewhere, get off the boat, see the sights, get back on the boat...yanno just like the brochure promised.   two weeks in a standard cruise ship cabin with nothing but endless ocian for a view isn't most people's idea of fun
 
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