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(CBS Baltimore)   The most powerful gang in Baltimore was the Gun Trace Task Force of the Baltimore City Police Department. Here's an idependent investigation and report on how criminal they were   (baltimore.cbslocal.com) divider line
    More: News, Police, Baltimore, Federal Bureau of Investigation, former BPD officers, Baltimore Police Department, final report, Crime, Constable  
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4275 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2022 at 8:30 AM (5 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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5 days ago  
To Serve and Protect... the guns
 
5 days ago  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
5 days ago  
This Tweet in the thread provides the most telling -- and most disturbing -- statement in the entire thing:

"The federal investigation that brought down the GTTF members-and subsequently the group of officers in Gladstone's orbit-was the result of happenstance and luck, and not the proper functioning of BPD's accountability system."

So, basically, this criminal operation that was operating with impunity would have never been caught if it hadn't been for two county police departments finding a tracking device on a suspect's car that they couldn't explain that resulted in a referral to the FBI.

But we're supposed to believe that police departments around the country don't need to be aggressively monitored by outside agencies, and that their internal investigative departments are sufficient to the tasks. Because, you know, this criminal organization within the Baltimore police department only existed in Baltimore, and it would be ludicrous to believe that similar groups are operating with similar impunity all over the country. It's just one or two bad apples, after all.
 
5 days ago  
Omar..."Oh Indeed."
 
5 days ago  
Is anyone surprised?
 
5 days ago  
It's refreshing to see a FBI investigation go into FAFO rather than Ain't Nothing Gonna Happen.
 
5 days ago  
Based on the name alone, I'm guessing at least as corrupt as the CRASH unit of Rampart infamy in Los Angeles?
 
5 days ago  
"None of these officers' colleagues reported any of them to [Internal Affairs] or the FBI," the report said. "None of the complaints against the corrupt officers that were filed by their victims were taken seriously by IA or the corrupt officers themselves."


So... every police department ever.
 
5 days ago  
Somebody found the notes on their criminal conspiracy.
 
5 days ago  
FTFA "The report identified "persistent weaknesses in supervision and accountability" in the department, including supervisors who "cultivated plausible deniability for the actions of their unit members" and supervisors who feared addressing misconduct would "diminish the productivity of their units, earn them enemies within their squads and more broadly within BPD, and create obstacles to their own future promotion."

Thin Blue Line indeed.......the above quote should be in the dictionary.  ACAB
 
5 days ago  
Baltimore is rotten to the core.
 
5 days ago  
I'll bet it was the falsifying overtime that really did them in.
 
5 days ago  
RIP Prop Joe
 
5 days ago  

sprgrss: Baltimore is rotten to the core.


Apple Core
Youtube ds3juU94LsY


Who's your friend?
 
5 days ago  
Was the obvious tag in prison due to planted evidence or was it executed by this cop scum?
 
5 days ago  
Fta: We can burn off the stink of this horrific scandal only through the use of the disinfectant of full disclosure," said Davis.

Did this guy learn to speak by watching Megamind?
 
5 days ago  
"None of these officers' colleagues reported any of them to [Internal Affairs] or the FBI," the report said. "None of the complaints against the corrupt officers that were filed by their victims were taken seriously by IA or the corrupt officers themselves."

The report identified "persistent weaknesses in supervision and accountability" in the department, including supervisors who "cultivated plausible deniability for the actions of their unit members" and supervisors who feared addressing misconduct would "diminish the productivity of their units, earn them enemies within their squads and more broadly within BPD, and create obstacles to their own future promotion."

Additionally, Baltimore police officers maintain an "us vs. them" mentality, "which served as a justification for BPD members to engage in misconduct when dealing with suspects believed to be involved in and profiting from criminal activities," the report said.



Man I feel like I could save this, edit a couple parts to change the name for the next corrupt PD story, and it'll be totally accurate.  It's almost like giving people authority and then relying on them to oversee themselves is a bad idea that has lead to a shiatload of corruption.
 
5 days ago  
Leroy Jenkins convicted of racketeering, armed robbery, selling drugs, falsifying overtime and planting evidence?  That explains a lot.
 
5 days ago  
"We've investigated ourselves, and we've found that... wait, what? We did something wrong?"
 
5 days ago  
Police shouldn't be investigating themselves.  This is why.
 
5 days ago  

Pocket Ninja: This Tweet in the thread provides the most telling -- and most disturbing -- statement in the entire thing:

"The federal investigation that brought down the GTTF members-and subsequently the group of officers in Gladstone's orbit-was the result of happenstance and luck, and not the proper functioning of BPD's accountability system."

So, basically, this criminal operation that was operating with impunity would have never been caught if it hadn't been for two county police departments finding a tracking device on a suspect's car that they couldn't explain that resulted in a referral to the FBI.

But we're supposed to believe that police departments around the country don't need to be aggressively monitored by outside agencies, and that their internal investigative departments are sufficient to the tasks. Because, you know, this criminal organization within the Baltimore police department only existed in Baltimore, and it would be ludicrous to believe that similar groups are operating with similar impunity all over the country. It's just one or two bad apples, after all.


One rotten apple spoils the whole barrel. People like to believe that saying means that apple isn't representative of the whole. They're lying to themselves; that one rotten apple just scratches the surface of what is nothing but rotting all the way down to the bottom.
 
5 days ago  

Gyrfalcon: Based on the name alone, I'm guessing at least as corrupt as the CRASH unit of Rampart infamy in Los Angeles?


A Rampart officer, also one the le "LAPD 44" with the most complaints of violence, moved to Santa Rosa when I lived there. My own interaction with the SRPD suggest a criminalized street gang, like when a small town has a big city gangbanger move in and organize the smalltime troublemakers into a militarized criminal collective.

He retired and does consultation work proudly announcing his Rampart background.
 
5 days ago  
Ah, I miss the days of proper journalism like this seems to be.  Not the random op-eds, tweets, rumor reporting, sponsored content, political narrative disguised as news or spin, etc.

/didn't get all the way through TFA so political spin might be in there later though
 
5 days ago  

thealgorerhythm: sprgrss: Baltimore is rotten to the core.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/ds3juU94​LsY]

Who's your best friend?


FTFY
 
5 days ago  
In the war on crime, the city's most dangerous offenders have light bars on their vehicles.

Dun dun dun.
 
5 days ago  

Spice Must Flow: Gyrfalcon: Based on the name alone, I'm guessing at least as corrupt as the CRASH unit of Rampart infamy in Los Angeles?

A Rampart officer, also one the le "LAPD 44" with the most complaints of violence, moved to Santa Rosa when I lived there. My own interaction with the SRPD suggest a criminalized street gang, like when a small town has a big city gangbanger move in and organize the smalltime troublemakers into a militarized criminal collective.

He retired and does consultation work proudly announcing his Rampart background.


People forget, if they ever knew, that "The Shield" was originally going to be called "Rampart" until Hollywood division found out about it and demanded some extensive changes.

I wonder if things would have been different if they'd had to own Vic Mackey and his boys.
 
5 days ago  
This would happen a lot less often if they required an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice to become a police officer in the United States. We're in a "land of laws" that doesn't require its law enforcement officers to know, understand, or give a rat's ass about the law.
 
5 days ago  
Think of all the money they'll save after the release of hundreds or thousands of prisoners whose convictions were tied to any of these officers! [Conservative talking point to be used as a "whatabout"]

On the upside: some percentage of those convicted likely were innocent.
Downside: The rest were not.
Flipside: a few former officers will take their places.

Corruption and lies create a lot of victims. The leadership, administrators and other officers who knew what was happening, but did nothing/said nothing need to be punished, also.
 
5 days ago  
SpaceMonkey-66:
Thin Blue Line indeed.......the above quote should be in the dictionary.  ACAB

i grew up in Baltimore.  it's all about the stats.  if you can give the Mayor the numbers they want, no one asks questions.  it's a problem of leadership that starts with the Mayor.  blaming the cops for doing whatever to make the numbers is the fault of the need to make the numbers.

Baltimore City government is a cancer on it's residents.
 
5 days ago  

WilderKWight: This would happen a lot less often if they required an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice to become a police officer in the United States. We're in a "land of laws" that doesn't require its law enforcement officers to know, understand, or give a rat's ass about the law.


Really? The root cause of police planting weapons and drugs to frame victims (and get away with it) is the police don't know that's illegal?
 
5 days ago  

Gyrfalcon: Based on the name alone, I'm guessing at least as corrupt as the CRASH unit of Rampart infamy in Los Angeles?


I've told this story before but I often do because it was such an eye-opener for me.

I was in the CA National Guard during the Rodney King riots and my unit was stationed in Rampart.  This was a shiatty area- gang infested, lots of stuff still smoldering, Korean shopowners shooting each other from rooftops trying to protect their stores, etc.

We arrived in force- tons of patrols out constantly walking the streets keeping a lid on everything.  The locals *loved* us- free coffee and doughnuts at every diner, people bringing us food while we were on patrol(*) and so on.

One time we were out and a little old lady came up to me with something she'd made- cookies or similar.  She gave them to me and thanked me for protecting them from the police.I'm standing next to a burned out building with gang graffiti covering what's left standing, and she was far more afraid of the LAPD than the gangs.  For a middle class white guy from the suburbs it took a while to process that.

And she was right to be more afraid of them- the parts of Rampart PD that weren't literally in gangs were worse than them.

/(*)Korean shopowners were offering ammo in any caliber we needed
 
5 days ago  

beezeltown: Think of all the money they'll save after the release of hundreds or thousands of prisoners whose convictions were tied to any of these officers! [Conservative talking point to be used as a "whatabout"]

On the upside: some percentage of those convicted likely were innocent.
Downside: The rest were not.
Flipside: a few former officers will take their places.

Corruption and lies create a lot of victims. The leadership, administrators and other officers who knew what was happening, but did nothing/said nothing need to be punished, also.


So no downside? Those released were innocent until proven guilty. If they weren't proven guilty in a fair trial (and if the police are planting evidence and lying in court, they weren't) then we consider them innocent.
 
5 days ago  
Marilyn Mosby is rubbing off on everyone there.
 
5 days ago  

Pocket Ninja: This Tweet in the thread provides the most telling -- and most disturbing -- statement in the entire thing:

"The federal investigation that brought down the GTTF members-and subsequently the group of officers in Gladstone's orbit-was the result of happenstance and luck, and not the proper functioning of BPD's accountability system."

So, basically, this criminal operation that was operating with impunity would have never been caught if it hadn't been for two county police departments finding a tracking device on a suspect's car that they couldn't explain that resulted in a referral to the FBI.

But we're supposed to believe that police departments around the country don't need to be aggressively monitored by outside agencies, and that their internal investigative departments are sufficient to the tasks. Because, you know, this criminal organization within the Baltimore police department only existed in Baltimore, and it would be ludicrous to believe that similar groups are operating with similar impunity all over the country. It's just one or two bad apples, after all.


It took 3 cops gunning down with fully automatic weapons another cop in a bath towel outside his parents home for the feds to get involved down in the US Virgin Islands around 1994. The whole drug department went down. I personally have seen my father give a K9 drug enforcement officer a couple ounces of cocaine so he wouldn't bust me for my stainless steel Ruger Mini-14 - hell, I'll name the cop as he was at least fired along with the rest if not also prosecuted - David Washington.

https://www.odmp.org/officer/18802-po​l​ice-officer-steven-alexis-hodge
 
5 days ago  

WilderKWight: This would happen a lot less often if they required an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice to become a police officer in the United States. We're in a "land of laws" that doesn't require its law enforcement officers to know, understand, or give a rat's ass about the law.


Many departments do require this, and they still have these issues. The problem is that during the hiring and training process, police departments weed out certain people and actively support other types of people. The people that they weed out and reject often are the people that will not do these types of things. The people that they want have a tendency to be more violent and aggressive, which is what police departments want, and as a result, you end up with cops that tend to break the law
 
5 days ago  

asciibaron: it's a problem of leadership that starts with the Mayor. blaming the cops for doing whatever to make the numbers is the fault of the need to make the numbers.


This is a BS conservative talking point. Cops organizing into a criminal gang, planting evidence, stealing from people, shaking people down regularly has nothing to do with "making numbers". They were a criminal gang intent on dominating, intimidating, and stealing.
 
5 days ago  
still waiting to find some of those good apples they keep talking about...
 
5 days ago  
It's that thing women put in their hoohas so they can develop health problems down there.
 
5 days ago  

mcmnky: beezeltown: Think of all the money they'll save after the release of hundreds or thousands of prisoners whose convictions were tied to any of these officers! [Conservative talking point to be used as a "whatabout"]

On the upside: some percentage of those convicted likely were innocent.
Downside: The rest were not.
Flipside: a few former officers will take their places.

Corruption and lies create a lot of victims. The leadership, administrators and other officers who knew what was happening, but did nothing/said nothing need to be punished, also.

So no downside? Those released were innocent until proven guilty. If they weren't proven guilty in a fair trial (and if the police are planting evidence and lying in court, they weren't) then we consider them innocent.


Sure, if you feel like it's a good thing when actual serial murderers are released because the cop who handled their case was corrupt.

As I said, some percentage probably are innocent. Some percentage definitely are not, though. If the guy busted for low level trafficking gets out early, it probably won't matter. But if a hitter who kills people for a living gets sprung on a technicality, that is clearly a bad thing.

Like I said, corruption creates a lot of victims. It hurts the innocent, but it can also benefit the guilty. We don't want violent criminals on the streets (including corrupt/violent police).
 
5 days ago  
"As for the victims of the GTTF, $13 million has been paid in restitution to them, with some cases still pending.

Over 800 criminal cases were dropped due to the scandal."
 
5 days ago  

BrerRobot: It's that thing women put in their hoohas so they can develop health problems down there.


Hello, visitor from Planet IUD.
 
5 days ago  

Farking Clown Shoes: To Serve and Protect... the guns



Will no one think of the guns?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
5 days ago  
Aww and they got caught right before the Armenian Money Train pulled into the station.
 
5 days ago  

thorpe: asciibaron: it's a problem of leadership that starts with the Mayor. blaming the cops for doing whatever to make the numbers is the fault of the need to make the numbers.

This is a BS conservative talking point.


i grew up and lived in Baltimore and saw first hand as a federal agent the stats game.  i am not a conservative, i'm speaking from first hand experience as a some percentage black man who mostly votes Democrat (sometimes a 3rd party).

corruption is rampant in Baltimore City government.  that corruption tumbles down the ranks because leadership at all levels allows it.  it's far beyond just the police.  the issue is the government allows it to happen because they are corrupt.
 
5 days ago  

aungen: Leroy Jenkins convicted of racketeering, armed robbery, selling drugs, falsifying overtime and planting evidence?  That explains a lot.


ongbok: WilderKWight: This would happen a lot less often if they required an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice to become a police officer in the United States. We're in a "land of laws" that doesn't require its law enforcement officers to know, understand, or give a rat's ass about the law.

Many departments do require this, and they still have these issues. The problem is that during the hiring and training process, police departments weed out certain people and actively support other types of people. The people that they weed out and reject often are the people that will not do these types of things. The people that they want have a tendency to be more violent and aggressive and below a certain IQ, which is what police departments want, and as a result, you end up with cops that tend to break the law and are more pliant to direction by corrupt superiors


Fixed to give a more thorough view of the problem.
 
5 days ago  

sephjnr: ignore the Leroy quote, forgot to remove it

 
5 days ago  

sephjnr: aungen: Leroy Jenkins convicted of racketeering, armed robbery, selling drugs, falsifying overtime and planting evidence?  That explains a lot.

ongbok: WilderKWight: This would happen a lot less often if they required an Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice to become a police officer in the United States. We're in a "land of laws" that doesn't require its law enforcement officers to know, understand, or give a rat's ass about the law.

Many departments do require this, and they still have these issues. The problem is that during the hiring and training process, police departments weed out certain people and actively support other types of people. The people that they weed out and reject often are the people that will not do these types of things. The people that they want have a tendency to be more violent and aggressive and below a certain IQ, which is what police departments want, and as a result, you end up with cops that tend to break the law and are more pliant to direction by corrupt superiors

Fixed to give a more thorough view of the problem.


the problem is the neighborhoods the most affected are apathetic about the gang violence on the streets, the middle class voters are worried the violence will start bleeding into their safe neighborhoods, and this drives the Mayor to push the police to do whatever it takes to curb the violence. 

i've watch this feedback loop countless times over my 50 years on this planet.

beam me up.
 
5 days ago  
baltimore, corruption at every level!
 
5 days ago  

pointfdr: baltimore, corruption at every level!


and don't forget the levels between the levels.  *cough cough* developers *cough cough*
 
5 days ago  
asciibaron:
the problem is the neighborhoods the most affected are apathetic about the gang violence on the streets, the middle class voters are worried the violence will start bleeding into their safe neighborhoods, and this drives the Mayor to push the police to do whatever it takes to curb the violence.

Security over freedom. What a 'novel' concept.

/now to complete the feedback loop throw in a notion that police/gov't-affiliated persons are supplying weapons to the streets in order to create need
 
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