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(Lifehacker)   How to spot authentic virgin   (lifehacker.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Olive oil, olive oil, true virgin, extra virgin olive oils, bottles of olive oil, Fatty acid, olive oil purveyor, oil  
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978 clicks; posted to Food » on 13 Jan 2022 at 12:31 PM (38 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2022-01-13 12:34:33 PM  
5 votes:
Toss your olive oil into an erupting volcano and see if things calm down.

Surprisingly, the tips are pretty good for American-produced olive oils. If you're gonna shell out for the good European stuff, just look for a DOP on top of when it was harvested/pressed.

The dude she talked to seems largely full of shiat on high heat cooking vs smoke point for home cooks, though. Not getting hotter than 425 F before adding the meat makes for some sad, sad stir fry. Also uh...you shouldn't be using olive oil for that anyway, for flavor reasons. Never mind smoke point reasons.

Deep frying in olive oil sounds pretty farking dubious. I could see it being good for falafel, but I'm pretty sure all that hot oil would damage your waffle maker.
 
2022-01-13 12:48:59 PM  
5 votes:
In the U.S., companies ignore the rules on good olive oil

What rules? The US industry has ensured that there are no rules and that most of the "olive oil" you buy probably isn't even olive oil.
 
2022-01-13 12:55:47 PM  
3 votes:

tintar: olrasputin: Toss your olive oil into an erupting volcano and see if things calm down.

Surprisingly, the tips are pretty good for American-produced olive oils. If you're gonna shell out for the good European stuff, just look for a DOP on top of when it was harvested/pressed.

The dude she talked to seems largely full of shiat on high heat cooking vs smoke point for home cooks, though. Not getting hotter than 425 F before adding the meat makes for some sad, sad stir fry. Also uh...you shouldn't be using olive oil for that anyway, for flavor reasons. Never mind smoke point reasons.

Deep frying in olive oil sounds pretty farking dubious. I could see it being good for falafel, but I'm pretty sure all that hot oil would damage your waffle maker.

[as I try to stop giggling about the waffle maker quip]

I think it was either you or NINEv2 who'd recommended California Olive Ranch as an affordable quality oil? is definitely on my list for when my current supply (of cheap Colavita, which surprisingly costs about the same per ounce as California Olive Ranch!) starts to run low.


I actually came to the thread to suggest California olive ranch.  It's great. I feel like this "olive oil is all fake" article gets reposted every year or so, and COR is always on the list of legit oils.
 
2022-01-13 1:05:03 PM  
3 votes:
I have heard for years that Kirkland Signature (aka Costco) is a good olive oil. This was when the UC Davis study first came out in 2010 showing how few US brands were actually as advertised. I am happy to see that they have maintained their production standards.

The only other companies named as a member of the COOC that I recognize are Pompeiian and Colavita. Disappointed the California Olive Ranch is not.

Of course, just because they are not a member doesn't mean they adulterate their oils. Just means more research is needed.
 
2022-01-14 7:07:45 AM  
2 votes:
And yes, DOP and similar EU stamps have meaning. Look for them
 
2022-01-13 12:44:58 PM  
1 vote:

olrasputin: Toss your olive oil into an erupting volcano and see if things calm down.

Surprisingly, the tips are pretty good for American-produced olive oils. If you're gonna shell out for the good European stuff, just look for a DOP on top of when it was harvested/pressed.

The dude she talked to seems largely full of shiat on high heat cooking vs smoke point for home cooks, though. Not getting hotter than 425 F before adding the meat makes for some sad, sad stir fry. Also uh...you shouldn't be using olive oil for that anyway, for flavor reasons. Never mind smoke point reasons.

Deep frying in olive oil sounds pretty farking dubious. I could see it being good for falafel, but I'm pretty sure all that hot oil would damage your waffle maker.


[as I try to stop giggling about the waffle maker quip]

I think it was either you or NINEv2 who'd recommended California Olive Ranch as an affordable quality oil? is definitely on my list for when my current supply (of cheap Colavita, which surprisingly costs about the same per ounce as California Olive Ranch!) starts to run low.
 
2022-01-13 12:54:30 PM  
1 vote:
tintar:

[as I try to stop giggling about the waffle maker quip]

I think it was either you or NINEv2 who'd recommended California Olive Ranch as an affordable quality oil? is definitely on my list for when my current supply (of cheap Colavita, which surprisingly costs about the same per ounce as California Olive Ranch!) starts to run low.


Yeah, I alternate between that and Cobram Estate, depending on which is on sale. For my daily use stuff, at least.

California Olive Ranch has become a victim of their own success, to a large extent. These days, you have to read the label pretty carefully to make sure you're getting first cold press from actual California olives, if that's what you're after. That's not to say their cheaper stuff isn't still pretty good--but their flagship bottles are fundamentally lower quality than they were 6-7 years ago.

I still recommend paying for a bottle of the really good foreign stuff for simple salad dressings and to drizzle on certain foods. Yes it's expensive, but it really is an eye opener.
 
2022-01-13 1:02:59 PM  
1 vote:

anuran: In the U.S., companies ignore the rules on good olive oil

What rules? The US industry has ensured that there are no rules and that most of the "olive oil" you buy probably isn't even olive oil.


not sure if ftfy
 
2022-01-13 2:13:47 PM  
1 vote:
Seems like Claire put some effort into this one. Probably a lot of cut and paste though. Somehow I don't see her thinking in metric. "The olives are crushed into a fine paste, then slowly churned and heated (usually to around 27℃) for 30 minutes to an hour, to help gather the smaller oil droplets."
 
2022-01-13 2:53:03 PM  
1 vote:

olrasputin: California Olive Ranch has become a victim of their own success, to a large extent. These days, you have to read the label pretty carefully to make sure you're getting first cold press from actual California olives, if that's what you're after.


If you've been buying their product for a while now then yeah, you need to check the label a little close now that they've started selling lower cost "global blends."  But they do list the countries of origin right on the front of the bottle in a decent sized font.  The name "California Olive Ranch" still kind of confuses things though.

catmandu: I have heard for years that Kirkland Signature (aka Costco) is a good olive oil. This was when the UC Davis study first came out in 2010 showing how few US brands were actually as advertised. I am happy to see that they have maintained their production standards.

The only other companies named as a member of the COOC that I recognize are Pompeiian and Colavita. Disappointed the California Olive Ranch is not.

Of course, just because they are not a member doesn't mean they adulterate their oils. Just means more research is needed.


I believe I've heard the same about the Costco brand.  I'll usually still go with the California Olive Ranch brand since it's carried in most stores I frequent, however Wegman's has a solid brand that gets the COOC label. So I'll get that when I happen to be there.
 
2022-01-13 3:31:14 PM  
1 vote:

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: olrasputin: California Olive Ranch has become a victim of their own success, to a large extent. These days, you have to read the label pretty carefully to make sure you're getting first cold press from actual California olives, if that's what you're after.

If you've been buying their product for a while now then yeah, you need to check the label a little close now that they've started selling lower cost "global blends."  But they do list the countries of origin right on the front of the bottle in a decent sized font.  The name "California Olive Ranch" still kind of confuses things though.

catmandu: I have heard for years that Kirkland Signature (aka Costco) is a good olive oil. This was when the UC Davis study first came out in 2010 showing how few US brands were actually as advertised. I am happy to see that they have maintained their production standards.

The only other companies named as a member of the COOC that I recognize are Pompeiian and Colavita. Disappointed the California Olive Ranch is not.

Of course, just because they are not a member doesn't mean they adulterate their oils. Just means more research is needed.

I believe I've heard the same about the Costco brand.  I'll usually still go with the California Olive Ranch brand since it's carried in most stores I frequent, however Wegman's has a solid brand that gets the COOC label. So I'll get that when I happen to be there.


Yeah, the country thing was pretty clear, but it seems over the past 2-3 years, they've moved their default away from first cold press as well.

Like I said, it's still overall good quality stuff. I just find myself having to read more carefully and pay a bit more to get the same product that initially won me over to the brand.
 
2022-01-14 7:07:13 AM  
1 vote:
I keep a minimum of three olive oils on the go at any time

One is basic dreck (still real though) in the 3-4L can used for cooking

One is a nice, light one
one is a nice peppery one

It's nice to have options

Good olive oils have similar costs to wine. If it doesn't, don't trust it
 
2022-01-14 10:19:23 AM  
1 vote:
Hey now, subby!
We take our LARPing very seriously

Fark user imageView Full Size


dnrtfa
 
2022-01-14 1:25:54 PM  
1 vote:

montreal_medic: I keep a minimum of three olive oils on the go at any time

One is basic dreck (still real though) in the 3-4L can used for cooking

One is a nice, light one
one is a nice peppery one

It's nice to have options

Good olive oils have similar costs to wine. If it doesn't, don't trust it


I have 3 also but 1 of them is Pomace olive oil that I use in soap making. It is the lowest grade and, while edible, you really don't want to cook with it.

I have a basic one for most cooking and a nice light one for cooking delicate foods or dressings
 
2022-01-14 1:27:35 PM  
1 vote:

catmandu: montreal_medic: I keep a minimum of three olive oils on the go at any time

One is basic dreck (still real though) in the 3-4L can used for cooking

One is a nice, light one
one is a nice peppery one

It's nice to have options

Good olive oils have similar costs to wine. If it doesn't, don't trust it

I have 3 also but 1 of them is Pomace olive oil that I use in soap making. It is the lowest grade and, while edible, you really don't want to cook with it.

I have a basic one for most cooking and a nice light one for cooking delicate foods or dressings


I keep some of that in the garage for washing tree sap off my hands and other similar purposes. Never moved it past the oil form though
 
2022-01-14 7:02:00 PM  
1 vote:

montreal_medic: catmandu: montreal_medic: I keep a minimum of three olive oils on the go at any time

One is basic dreck (still real though) in the 3-4L can used for cooking

One is a nice, light one
one is a nice peppery one

It's nice to have options

Good olive oils have similar costs to wine. If it doesn't, don't trust it

I have 3 also but 1 of them is Pomace olive oil that I use in soap making. It is the lowest grade and, while edible, you really don't want to cook with it.

I have a basic one for most cooking and a nice light one for cooking delicate foods or dressings

I keep some of that in the garage for washing tree sap off my hands and other similar purposes. Never moved it past the oil form though


Get yourself some pure lye, add water, and you have a basic castile soap.
 
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