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(Big Think)   Dark energy is here, and that means our Universe is almost over   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Scary, General relativity, Dark matter, Big Bang, Universe, Physical cosmology, Galaxy, Dark energy, dark energy  
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1493 clicks; posted to STEM » on 05 Jan 2022 at 4:33 AM (20 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2022-01-05 3:14:40 AM  
Ethan Siegel has Big Dark Energy.
 
2022-01-05 3:25:05 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size

"How much time do we have left?"
"Sixty trillion years, seventy at the most."
"Oh, no!"
 
2022-01-05 3:50:25 AM  
My money's still on Giant Meteor...
 
2022-01-05 4:40:19 AM  
I'm gonna stick around after it's over. I heard there's a scene after the end credits.
 
2022-01-05 4:58:29 AM  
Big Think: For those who find The Conversation or using crayons too difficult.
 
2022-01-05 5:00:27 AM  
About damn time.
 
2022-01-05 5:16:29 AM  

bloobeary: I'm gonna stick around after it's over. I heard there's a scene after the end credits.


I've heard it's just the voice of God saying "Well that didn't work right".
 
2022-01-05 5:25:39 AM  
What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization
 
2022-01-05 5:33:36 AM  
In the case of dark matter, we actually do have tantalizing experimental hints, clues and models which make predictions that exclude various parameters. There's actually a chance that we may detect it before 2050.

On the other hand, we know expansion is currently accelerating, and switched to accelerating when the universe was about half its current age. Literally the only thing we know for certain about the force/property/??? that's driving this dialation of the Universe's metric is that we've decided to call it "dark energy."

Maybe we should figure out more than the name before we write the Universe's obituary, eh?
 
2022-01-05 5:44:01 AM  

bloobeary: I'm gonna stick around after it's over. I heard there's a scene after the end credits.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 5:51:53 AM  
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

There is another theory which states that this has already happened.
 
2022-01-05 5:56:19 AM  
FLAGRANT QUANTUM ERROR


Universe over.

Dark Matter = Very Yes.

 
2022-01-05 6:17:36 AM  
All this has happened  before  and  it will  happen again.
 
2022-01-05 6:32:02 AM  
nasa.govView Full Size
: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization
 
2022-01-05 6:38:35 AM  

Unobtanium: There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

There is another theory which states that this has already happened.


Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.
 
2022-01-05 7:14:19 AM  

Mr_Vimes: Big Think: For those who find The Conversation or using crayons too difficult.


LOL
 
2022-01-05 7:15:59 AM  

dittybopper: Unobtanium: There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

There is another theory which states that this has already happened.

Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.


"THERE IS AS YET INSUFFICIENT DATA FOR A 
MEANINGFUL ANSWER."
 
2022-01-05 7:17:59 AM  

lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization


But at least he's not on Forbes now, so we got that going for us, right?

>>>"...because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization"

My, that sounds juicy. I'd love to read about that. Do you have any cites?

(Waiting... waiting.... Didn't think so.)
 
2022-01-05 7:20:38 AM  

LewDux: [nasa.gov image 398x122] [View Full Size image _x_]: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization


LOL, perfect. I'm stealing that.
 
2022-01-05 7:45:47 AM  
What awaits us at the end....

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 7:46:08 AM  

lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization


Because we can analyze and quantify its effects even if we don't know what it's made of, much like how we had a workable theory of optics long before we understood the nature of light.
 
2022-01-05 8:24:17 AM  
 In this verse, life is antagonistic to the natural state. Here humans in all their various races are a spontaneous outbreak. An unguided mistake. Our purpose is to correct that mistake... because there is another verse. A verse where life is welcomed and cherished. A ravishing ever-new place called Underverse... but the road to that verse crosses over the threshold.
 
2022-01-05 8:44:37 AM  

bloobeary: I'm gonna stick around after it's over. I heard there's a scene after the end credits.


The post-credits scene at the end of the universe.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 8:49:49 AM  

qorkfiend: lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization

Because we can analyze and quantify its effects even if we don't know what it's made of, much like how we had a workable theory of optics long before we understood the nature of light.


That's like suedescience and stuff
 
2022-01-05 8:57:14 AM  

qorkfiend: lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization

Because we can analyze and quantify its effects even if we don't know what it's made of, much like how we had a workable theory of optics long before we understood the nature of light.


We really cant though. Figuring out dark matter right now is like building a puzzle of a blank white board with pieces from 20 other puzzles. It might look like we got it right while being completely wrong.

We CANNOT say anything about it until we are able to give it a definite form of sorts, be it a state of matter, a higher dimensional matter form, a form of energy or god knows what else
 
2022-01-05 8:59:42 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: I've heard it's just the voice of God saying "Well that didn't work right".

"Hang on, I think I put that battery in backwards, try it now..."

 
2022-01-05 9:12:47 AM  
I blame Mike Pence.
 
2022-01-05 9:30:32 AM  
I just figured our Universe was getting sucked into the black hole of a bigger Universe.
 
2022-01-05 9:33:42 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 9:33:59 AM  

Close2TheEdge: What awaits us at the end....

[Fark user image image 700x368]


I just re-watched that, having not seen it since 1979.

Some of the special effects are stunning, some are almost laughable, and over all despite having a cast of excellent actors, it isn't good.
 
2022-01-05 9:34:42 AM  

LewDux: qorkfiend: lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization

Because we can analyze and quantify its effects even if we don't know what it's made of, much like how we had a workable theory of optics long before we understood the nature of light.

That's like suedescience and stuff


Got off of my blue suedescience.
 
2022-01-05 11:02:30 AM  
dark energy is a property of space itself, so its energy density remains constant (1/a0), irrespective of the Universe's expansion or volume

I think this assumes a lot. Personally I think dark energy will be explained by higher dimensions, like Einstein believed gravity is. I dunno, maybe dark energy becomes so overwhelming it resets the universe to the big bang.
 
2022-01-05 11:24:39 AM  

erik-k: In the case of dark matter, we actually do have tantalizing experimental hints, clues and models which make predictions that exclude various parameters. There's actually a chance that we may detect it before 2050.

On the other hand, we know expansion is currently accelerating, and switched to accelerating when the universe was about half its current age. Literally the only thing we know for certain about the force/property/??? that's driving this dialation of the Universe's metric is that we've decided to call it "dark energy."

Maybe we should figure out more than the name before we write the Universe's obituary, eh?


Or the tools we are currently using for measurement are inaccurate / not capable enough. We have 'invented' dark energy / dark matter to balance equations so that our models can even come close to accurately predicting observable phenomenon. The problem is our model. Newton was great on Earth. It worked every time. Then we started having problems calculating Mercury's orbit. Einstein stepped-in and relativity solved those problems. Now the problem is that galaxies aren't behaving correctly so we use dark matter / dark energy to fudge the numbers so that Einstein still works. Something else is going on. I hope I live long enough for the next Newton / Einstein to come along, but part of me doubts it will ever happen. Maybe there are just some things in the universe that mere mortals will never be able to access scientifically and we are stuck with questionable theories.
 
2022-01-05 11:39:16 AM  

madgonad: erik-k: In the case of dark matter, we actually do have tantalizing experimental hints, clues and models which make predictions that exclude various parameters. There's actually a chance that we may detect it before 2050.

On the other hand, we know expansion is currently accelerating, and switched to accelerating when the universe was about half its current age. Literally the only thing we know for certain about the force/property/??? that's driving this dialation of the Universe's metric is that we've decided to call it "dark energy."

Maybe we should figure out more than the name before we write the Universe's obituary, eh?

Or the tools we are currently using for measurement are inaccurate / not capable enough. We have 'invented' dark energy / dark matter to balance equations so that our models can even come close to accurately predicting observable phenomenon. The problem is our model. Newton was great on Earth. It worked every time. Then we started having problems calculating Mercury's orbit. Einstein stepped-in and relativity solved those problems. Now the problem is that galaxies aren't behaving correctly so we use dark matter / dark energy to fudge the numbers so that Einstein still works. Something else is going on. I hope I live long enough for the next Newton / Einstein to come along, but part of me doubts it will ever happen. Maybe there are just some things in the universe that mere mortals will never be able to access scientifically and we are stuck with questionable theories.


This.

I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist.  I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations.  We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well.  It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered.  Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

I asked the right guy.  That was the most awesomeist answer ever for an eight-year old.

Maybe we need some sort of Dark Monarch, perhaps a female this time, to reveal her secrets to us...

pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 12:07:45 PM  

lifeslammer: qorkfiend: lifeslammer: What kind of fourth rate crackpot makes conclusions about the impact dark energy has when we have no idea ehat it even is or how it figures in the puzzle of the universe?


Oh right. The monkey in glasses who has to write a crappy blog because he got laughed out of every real scientific organization

Because we can analyze and quantify its effects even if we don't know what it's made of, much like how we had a workable theory of optics long before we understood the nature of light.

We really cant though. Figuring out dark matter right now is like building a puzzle of a blank white board with pieces from 20 other puzzles. It might look like we got it right while being completely wrong.

We CANNOT say anything about it until we are able to give it a definite form of sorts, be it a state of matter, a higher dimensional matter form, a form of energy or god knows what else


You should send a scholarly letter to Siegel and tell him of your concerns. Cite your credentials, of course.
 
2022-01-05 12:49:45 PM  

bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist.  I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations.  We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well.  It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered.  Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

I asked the right guy.  That was the most awesomeist answer ever for an eight-year old.


Well, fortunately we've got all our best people working on trying to nail down... the mathematical value of the fudge factor! ;)

I asked a guy I took data for at Berkeley Labs (no, not Perlmutter): If we do figure out what this is, what does that get us?  He said there's no way to know, just like nobody had any idea what would come out of Planck and Einstein's work until some time after... but that those things had eventually gotten us a lot of cool stuff.

I used to take data on supernovae that was going to help a bunch of people do this.  I asked one of them:
If we ever figure out what dark energy is, what does that get us?
He said there was no way to tell
 
2022-01-05 1:31:04 PM  

dbirchall: bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist.  I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations.  We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well.  It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered.  Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

I asked the right guy.  That was the most awesomeist answer ever for an eight-year old.

Well, fortunately we've got all our best people working on trying to nail down... the mathematical value of the fudge factor! ;)

I asked a guy I took data for at Berkeley Labs (no, not Perlmutter): If we do figure out what this is, what does that get us?  He said there's no way to know, just like nobody had any idea what would come out of Planck and Einstein's work until some time after... but that those things had eventually gotten us a lot of cool stuff.

I used to take data on supernovae that was going to help a bunch of people do this.  I asked one of them:
If we ever figure out what dark energy is, what does that get us?
He said there was no way to tell


Guaranteed: someone will figure out how to build a bomb out of it.
 
2022-01-05 2:06:52 PM  

Harlee: dbirchall: bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist.  I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations.  We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well.  It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered.  Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

I asked the right guy.  That was the most awesomeist answer ever for an eight-year old.

Well, fortunately we've got all our best people working on trying to nail down... the mathematical value of the fudge factor! ;)

I asked a guy I took data for at Berkeley Labs (no, not Perlmutter): If we do figure out what this is, what does that get us?  He said there's no way to know, just like nobody had any idea what would come out of Planck and Einstein's work until some time after... but that those things had eventually gotten us a lot of cool stuff.

I used to take data on supernovae that was going to help a bunch of people do this.  I asked one of them:
If we ever figure out what dark energy is, what does that get us?
He said there was no way to tell

Guaranteed: someone will figure out how to build a bomb out of it.


Well that is true. We already know how to turn a black hole into a bomb
 
2022-01-05 2:11:02 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2022-01-05 2:26:48 PM  

Harlee: dbirchall: bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist.  I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations.  We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well.  It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered.  Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

I asked the right guy.  That was the most awesomeist answer ever for an eight-year old.

Well, fortunately we've got all our best people working on trying to nail down... the mathematical value of the fudge factor! ;)

I asked a guy I took data for at Berkeley Labs (no, not Perlmutter): If we do figure out what this is, what does that get us?  He said there's no way to know, just like nobody had any idea what would come out of Planck and Einstein's work until some time after... but that those things had eventually gotten us a lot of cool stuff.

Guaranteed: someone will figure out how to build a bomb out of it.


Funny you should mention that. I mentioned his answer to the director of a Japanese facility where I worked, and... well, while you or I may think "field theories and quantum physics got us iPhones!" Japanese people think "field theories and quantum physics got us NUKED... and then much much later got us anything good."
 
2022-01-05 3:17:46 PM  

dittybopper: Close2TheEdge: What awaits us at the end....

[Fark user image image 700x368]

I just re-watched that, having not seen it since 1979.

Some of the special effects are stunning, some are almost laughable, and over all despite having a cast of excellent actors, it isn't good.


Yeah, but you have to admire the shear chutzpah for putting this existential vision of hell at the end of your Walt Disney kiddie Star Wars knockoff.
 
2022-01-05 3:57:44 PM  

bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist. I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations. We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well. It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered. Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."


You are very lucky to meet scientist that knew THE answer to this problem
 
2022-01-05 4:30:40 PM  

LewDux: bughunter: I was at a Carnegie Institute open house a few years ago with bughunter 2.0 and I was chatting up the chief scientist. I asked him to explain dark energy to us so that an eight-year-old could understand it (one of my favorite ways to engage PhDs... >:-)

He said, and I quote, "It's a fudge factor to make our equations match our observations. We don't know why it has to be there, but the fudge factor works very well. It means there's another physical phenomenon that we haven't yet discovered. Whoever discovers it is going to be as famous as Newton and Einstein."

You are very lucky to meet scientist that knew THE answer to this problem


I don't know is a legit answer is science and engineering.

Good thing some of you farkers aren't saddled with that humility.
 
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