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(Fark)   If you're watching TV and wait until the ball drops to start celebrating the new year, you're already late   (fark.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Television, HD Radio, Radio, Broadcasting, Satellite television, good old analog days, live television, Coaxial cable  
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227 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 01 Jan 2022 at 1:05 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-31 10:50:18 PM  
a little New Years tip for you from somebody who is technically a broadcast engineer (really more of an IT guy who's worked in both radio and TV stations). if you are one of the millions of people that watch the ball drop on the TV and celebrate the start of the new year exactly when the broadcast says it's midnight and you hear Ryan Seacrest over-enunciate "Happy New Year" - you're actually celebrating late. 2022 is already well underway by then.

the reason is any live television broadcast you watch today is slightly delayed thanks to digital encoding and - depending on the network - perhaps an extra few seconds for a profanity delay. back in the good old analog days, there was almost zero delay. the signal went from the network up to the satellite, back down to the station, over the STL, and out to the transmitter and into your home. the signal traveled at the speed of light, and even if you figured in the 45 thousand miles up and back from the satellite - you would probably not notice the roughly 1/4 second delay. in fact - when I started my career working on air in radio, our headphone source was actually the processed analog over the air signal. perhaps you might notice just a tiny, tiny delay between the words coming out of your mouth and what you hear in your headphones, but not enough to bother you. you could not do that if the source was an "HD Radio" signal - that takes about 5 to 8 seconds to process. by the way - "HD Radio" doesn't mean "high definition radio". it's actually a garbage technology that should never have been adopted because it was already obsolete then and just needs to die now, but I digress.

but digital television is a bit different - it just takes time to process and get that signal to you. there are a number of steps in the broadcast chain - encoding, compression, noise reduction, etc - that add latency to the signal. I've noticed at my station that if I watch the network feed off the satellite and the over the air feed - there's a good two to three second delay between the two. so if you are going to watch the ball drop on TV and start celebrating when the ball hits the ground and says "happy new year!" - watching an over the air broadcast might be your best bet because it will only be a few seconds behind when midnight actually occurred.

of course - many of us get our television programming from a cable or satellite provider. in that case - it will take even longer for 2022 to start for you. for cable systems - the delay will depend on the cable system, how they get the programming from the station, and how much they process and compress the signal to deliver it over their network. I know at my station Comcast takes a direct fiber feed of our signal to the head end, and they in turn provide that signal to some other cable systems in the area. other cable companies simply take the over the air signal and use that. each company then takes that signal and compresses it to their specifications because there's only so much bandwidth available so they want to get as many channels and services in there as they can. each step of that introduces even more latency. I have Comcast at my house, and I noticed that the difference last year between actual midnight and when it said midnight on the broadcast was about 8 seconds.

if you have a satellite provider and watch the ball drop - well, you're waiting even longer for 2022 to start. I'm not an expert with how they run, but from what I know both Dish Network and DirecTV usually have a deal with a local station in a market where they put their equipment in, capture the OTA signals for each of the stations in the market, upload those signals to their facilities, process them, then send them back out to their customers. Dish has their equipment at our station, but other than getting a call from them once asking me to reboot an encoder, I haven't dealt with them. but their signals are rather far behind - it could be an easy fifteen to twenty seconds between actual midnight and when you see the ball drop on a satellite broadcast.

and for those of you who are live streaming a broadcast over the internet - well it might be closer to 2023 before you finally see the ball drop. not only do you have all of the usual broadcast delays, but live streaming usually adds in at least a few second buffer to cover any network disruptions and drop outs. when a television network provides a live broadcast to their affiliates, the entire broadcast chain is private and they have full control over it. broadcasting over the internet is different because they don't have control over the entire chain - they have to rely on the different ISP's and backbone providers to get that signal to you over the public internet. so the best they can do in many cases is add in a buffer to account for any data loss or disruption, and that just adds in more delay.
so just remind yourself tonight that if you want 2021 to end as quickly as possible, don't wait for the TV to say it's midnight. usually I find a cell phone or a computer clock is your best bet to accurately celebrate midnight.

happy new year!
 
2021-12-31 10:52:28 PM  
tldr stream lag
 
2021-12-31 10:53:06 PM  
My balls dropped, like, 25 years ago. I don't need to celebrate anymore.
 
2021-12-31 10:53:22 PM  
Happy 2023!
 
2021-12-31 10:58:16 PM  

poconojoe: a little New Years tip for you from somebody who is technically a broadcast engineer (really more of an IT guy who's worked in both radio and TV stations). if you are one of the millions of people that watch the ball drop on the TV and celebrate the start of the new year exactly when the broadcast says it's midnight and you hear Ryan Seacrest over-enunciate "Happy New Year" - you're actually celebrating late. 2022 is already well underway by then.

the reason is any live television broadcast you watch today is slightly delayed thanks to digital encoding and - depending on the network - perhaps an extra few seconds for a profanity delay. back in the good old analog days, there was almost zero delay. the signal went from the network up to the satellite, back down to the station, over the STL, and out to the transmitter and into your home. the signal traveled at the speed of light, and even if you figured in the 45 thousand miles up and back from the satellite - you would probably not notice the roughly 1/4 second delay. in fact - when I started my career working on air in radio, our headphone source was actually the processed analog over the air signal. perhaps you might notice just a tiny, tiny delay between the words coming out of your mouth and what you hear in your headphones, but not enough to bother you. you could not do that if the source was an "HD Radio" signal - that takes about 5 to 8 seconds to process. by the way - "HD Radio" doesn't mean "high definition radio". it's actually a garbage technology that should never have been adopted because it was already obsolete then and just needs to die now, but I digress.

but digital television is a bit different - it just takes time to process and get that signal to you. there are a number of steps in the broadcast chain - encoding, compression, noise reduction, etc - that add latency to the signal. I've noticed at my station that if I watch the network feed off the satellite and the over the air feed - there's a g ...



I'm presently at a party.  On New Year's Eve.


No fun.
 
2021-12-31 11:02:52 PM  
You know who else didn't have a ball drop?
 
2021-12-31 11:09:20 PM  
Hmm.

Why don't you just go ruin the friggin Easter Bunny now?
 
2021-12-31 11:17:09 PM  
That's cute.  You all still believe in "time".
 
2021-12-31 11:59:18 PM  
on my cable system, from their clock NBC is 17 seconds behind

/yeah I'm fun at parties
 
2022-01-01 12:04:37 AM  

poconojoe: a little New Years tip for you from somebody who is technically a broadcast engineer (really more of an IT guy who's worked in both radio and TV stations). if you are one of the millions of people that watch the ball drop on the TV and celebrate the start of the new year exactly when the broadcast says it's midnight and you hear Ryan Seacrest over-enunciate "Happy New Year" - you're actually celebrating late. 2022 is already well underway by then.

the reason is any live television broadcast you watch today is slightly delayed thanks to digital encoding and - depending on the network - perhaps an extra few seconds for a profanity delay. back in the good old analog days, there was almost zero delay. the signal went from the network up to the satellite, back down to the station, over the STL, and out to the transmitter and into your home. the signal traveled at the speed of light, and even if you figured in the 45 thousand miles up and back from the satellite - you would probably not notice the roughly 1/4 second delay. in fact - when I started my career working on air in radio, our headphone source was actually the processed analog over the air signal. perhaps you might notice just a tiny, tiny delay between the words coming out of your mouth and what you hear in your headphones, but not enough to bother you. you could not do that if the source was an "HD Radio" signal - that takes about 5 to 8 seconds to process. by the way - "HD Radio" doesn't mean "high definition radio". it's actually a garbage technology that should never have been adopted because it was already obsolete then and just needs to die now, but I digress.

but digital television is a bit different - it just takes time to process and get that signal to you. there are a number of steps in the broadcast chain - encoding, compression, noise reduction, etc - that add latency to the signal. I've noticed at my station that if I watch the network feed off the satellite and the over the air feed - there's a g ...



crap, I was reading all of your post and I missed midnight.
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2022-01-01 12:31:14 AM  

Billy Liar: That's cute.  You all still believe in "time".


images.squarespace-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2022-01-01 1:07:50 AM  
Welcome to 2020 II.
 
2022-01-01 1:08:37 AM  

Billy Liar: That's cute.  You all still believe in "time".


Daylight Savings Time has proven that time is an illusion. It's always whatever time you think it is, whether it is or not.
 
2022-01-01 1:16:18 AM  
Because of this comment:

revrendjim: You know who else didn't have a ball drop?


And this one:

jbc: Billy Liar: That's cute.  You all still believe in "time".

[images.squarespace-cdn.com image 850x637]


I'm now back down the Ong's Hat rabbit hole.
See you in the other dimensions when I step out of my egg!
 
2022-01-01 1:19:55 AM  
I watched the ball drop on the ABC NYE program. Every last one of the people hosting were massively annoying.
 
2022-01-01 1:25:15 AM  
Time is the essence
Time is the season
Time ain't no reason
Got no time to slow
Time everlasting
Time to play b sides
Time ain't on my side
Time I'll never know
 
2022-01-01 1:44:59 AM  
Youtube and wine. Keeping it nouveau-classy this new years.
 
2022-01-01 2:50:56 AM  

poconojoe: a little New Years tip for you from somebody who is technically a broadcast engineer (really more of an IT guy who's worked in both radio and TV stations). if you are one of the millions of people that watch the ball drop on the TV and celebrate the start of the new year exactly when the broadcast says it's midnight and you hear Ryan Seacrest over-enunciate "Happy New Year" - you're actually celebrating late. 2022 is already well underway by then.

the reason is any live television broadcast you watch today is slightly delayed thanks to digital encoding and - depending on the network - perhaps an extra few seconds for a profanity delay. back in the good old analog days, there was almost zero delay. the signal went from the network up to the satellite, back down to the station, over the STL, and out to the transmitter and into your home. the signal traveled at the speed of light, and even if you figured in the 45 thousand miles up and back from the satellite - you would probably not notice the roughly 1/4 second delay. in fact - when I started my career working on air in radio, our headphone source was actually the processed analog over the air signal. perhaps you might notice just a tiny, tiny delay between the words coming out of your mouth and what you hear in your headphones, but not enough to bother you. you could not do that if the source was an "HD Radio" signal - that takes about 5 to 8 seconds to process. by the way - "HD Radio" doesn't mean "high definition radio". it's actually a garbage technology that should never have been adopted because it was already obsolete then and just needs to die now, but I digress.

but digital television is a bit different - it just takes time to process and get that signal to you. there are a number of steps in the broadcast chain - encoding, compression, noise reduction, etc - that add latency to the signal. I've noticed at my station that if I watch the network feed off the satellite and the over the air feed - there's a g ...


I'm on the West Coast. We've always seen the ball drop on a 3 hour delay. Worth it to live here.
 
2022-01-01 3:20:05 AM  

Wanebo: Hmm.

Why don't you just go ruin the friggin Easter Bunny now?


I mean everyone knows the Easter Bunny paid Judas to get Jesus offed, right?
 
2022-01-01 4:08:36 AM  
I go to Greenwich, I go straight to Greenwich and I stand there, where I receive the best approximation of the New Year that man is able to come up with.  Oh!  Oh!  Oh, god yes!  I feel it--the New Year!!

/gimme a kiss
 
2022-01-01 5:31:03 AM  

poconojoe: a little New Years tip for you from somebody who is technically a broadcast engineer (really more of an IT guy who's worked in both radio and TV stations). if you are one of the millions of people that watch the ball drop on the TV and celebrate the start of the new year exactly when the broadcast says it's midnight and you hear Ryan Seacrest over-enunciate "Happy New Year" - you're actually celebrating late. 2022 is already well underway by then.

the reason is any live television broadcast you watch today is slightly delayed thanks to digital encoding and - depending on the network - perhaps an extra few seconds for a profanity delay. back in the good old analog days, there was almost zero delay. the signal went from the network up to the satellite, back down to the station, over the STL, and out to the transmitter and into your home. the signal traveled at the speed of light, and even if you figured in the 45 thousand miles up and back from the satellite - you would probably not notice the roughly 1/4 second delay. in fact - when I started my career working on air in radio, our headphone source was actually the processed analog over the air signal. perhaps you might notice just a tiny, tiny delay between the words coming out of your mouth and what you hear in your headphones, but not enough to bother you. you could not do that if the source was an "HD Radio" signal - that takes about 5 to 8 seconds to process. by the way - "HD Radio" doesn't mean "high definition radio". it's actually a garbage technology that should never have been adopted because it was already obsolete then and just needs to die now, but I digress.

but digital television is a bit different - it just takes time to process and get that signal to you. there are a number of steps in the broadcast chain - encoding, compression, noise reduction, etc - that add latency to the signal. I've noticed at my station that if I watch the network feed off the satellite and the over the air feed - there's a g ...


Been in radio almost 30 years.  Between HD delay and digital processing, I really miss being able to monitor from the air signal.  Let alone just using a Walkman as a monitor doing remotes because there was no or very minimal latency.  Then there's being able to hear the processing as you're talking over a record so your levels are right on.  Now we don't even know if we're off the air until the alarm light starts flashing.
 
2022-01-01 6:32:14 AM  
There's also a delay of a few milliseconds between sensory impulses and conscious interpretation by the brain, although the distance from from the eye down the optic nerve to the occipital lobe is a short one. I suspect the placement of our sense organs is to limit the latency between sensory input and conscious awareness. Anyway, my point is that we're all living in the past, even if it is by a few milliseconds.
 
2022-01-01 11:49:09 AM  
Happy New Year Farkers!
 
2022-01-01 11:49:42 AM  

mactheknife: Welcome to 2020 II.


That was last year. Now we're moving on to 2020: Tokyo Drift.
 
2022-01-01 12:07:13 PM  

mactheknife: Welcome to 2020 II.


2020 III, surely.

Or March 672nd, 2020 or so.
 
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