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(NASA)   Ohhhhhh, Webb is halfway there....oh OH, sun shields bloccck glare   (jwst.nasa.gov) divider line
    More: Followup, Temperature, Webb's flight, top of the page, deployment step, Temperature control, thumbnail of Webb, distance numbers, Spacecraft  
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2174 clicks; posted to STEM » on 31 Dec 2021 at 10:05 PM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-12-31 5:09:40 PM  
A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination
 
2021-12-31 6:01:00 PM  

Notabunny: A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination


Yet, somehow, subby decides to use a Bon Jovi headline.

/why???
//what did we do?
///I demand answers
 
2021-12-31 6:48:42 PM  
In the system where we live boffins learn about the stellar lives,
It's made of hydrogen, helium and heat.
Those rays will kill your eyes.
 
2021-12-31 7:12:56 PM  

Notabunny: A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination


That technology has been around for nearly 40 years

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-31 7:34:10 PM  

bearded clamorer: Notabunny: A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination

That technology has been around for nearly 40 years

[Fark user image 600x380]


Yes, but that technology only works in Earths atmosphere.  Not in the vacuum of space with unfiltered sunlight directly on it
 
2021-12-31 7:42:28 PM  
The first step of the actual sunshield deployment has been completed successfully!

https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477074540081692680

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-31 8:04:06 PM  
Sunshield PORT Mid-Boom

Ok, Boomer.

/ boomer
 
2021-12-31 8:20:03 PM  
I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!
 
2021-12-31 8:21:17 PM  

ryebread: "Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."


Meant to source this...
 
2021-12-31 8:28:17 PM  

ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!


There's no cameras on it. Wouldn't a few cameras have helped in working that out.

I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

/in addition to quadruple failsafes
 
2021-12-31 8:31:47 PM  

khitsicker: The first step of the actual sunshield deployment has been completed successfully!

https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477074540081692680

[Fark user image image 596x769]


The first boom deployed in just under 3.5 hours. The second started deploying around around an hour and a half ago, so hopefully we'll be hearing some more good news soon.
 
2021-12-31 8:33:11 PM  

ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!


Even from an outsider, the TIGHT, efficient, and amazing engineering could be a whole course for study.  Over 344 possible points of failure.  and that was ONE that was made redundant by 2 other backup systems.

reminds me back in the day when i discovered the elegance of what a single line of programming code in BASIC could do.   Sure miss those days
 
2021-12-31 8:45:38 PM  

ryebread: khitsicker: The first step of the actual sunshield deployment has been completed successfully!

https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477074540081692680

[Fark user image image 596x769]

The first boom deployed in just under 3.5 hours. The second started deploying around around an hour and a half ago, so hopefully we'll be hearing some more good news soon.


I am refreshing the wheres webb page like every 15 minutes.
 
2021-12-31 9:05:43 PM  

bearded clamorer: Notabunny: A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination

That technology has been around for nearly 40 years

[Fark user image image 600x380]


That failed because they put the cheese on the cold side.
 
2021-12-31 9:15:01 PM  
This is the best that 2021 had to offer. And I'm not mad about it at all.
 
2021-12-31 9:31:32 PM  

khitsicker: ryebread: khitsicker: The first step of the actual sunshield deployment has been completed successfully!

https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477074540081692680

[Fark user image image 596x769]

The first boom deployed in just under 3.5 hours. The second started deploying around around an hour and a half ago, so hopefully we'll be hearing some more good news soon.

I am refreshing the wheres webb page like every 15 minutes.


I don't think they mention it or link to it, I only know because I just tried the URLs and got lucky, but there are Atom/RSS feeds if that makes your life a little less tedious.
 
2021-12-31 10:04:34 PM  
Really well done on the headline, sub bon mitter
 
2021-12-31 10:29:58 PM  
Halfway there in only 6 days? Why, it'll be there by next weekend!

/yeah, I know
//it's coasting uphill
///in space!!!
 
2021-12-31 10:32:25 PM  

Spectrum: Halfway there in only 6 days? Why, it'll be there by next weekend!

/yeah, I know
//it's coasting uphill
///in space!!!


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-31 10:43:51 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Spectrum: Halfway there in only 6 days? Why, it'll be there by next weekend!

/yeah, I know
//it's coasting uphill
///in space!!!

[Fark user image 220x128] [View Full Size image _x_]


Better buy a telescope.  Wanna see me?  Buy a telescope.  Gonna be Am in space.
 
2021-12-31 10:53:42 PM  
 
2021-12-31 10:55:10 PM  

Spectrum: Halfway there in only 6 days? Why, it'll be there by next weekend!

/yeah, I know
//it's coasting uphill
///in space!!!


It has lost about 1 mile/second since the L2 Injection - down from about 1.4 mi/sec to about .4 mi/sec.
 
2021-12-31 10:57:01 PM  

khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!


YES!!!
 
2021-12-31 10:57:47 PM  
The second boom is extended!

Fark user imageView Full Size


now it is time to tighten and trim
 
2021-12-31 10:59:12 PM  

Gubbo: ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!

There's no cameras on it. Wouldn't a few cameras have helped in working that out.

I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

/in addition to quadruple failsafes


It is a camera dumbass
 
2021-12-31 11:02:10 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!


Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-31 11:03:09 PM  

Russ1642: Gubbo: ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!

There's no cameras on it. Wouldn't a few cameras have helped in working that out.

I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

/in addition to quadruple failsafes

It is a camera dumbass


Ummm.....yeah sure. Ok
 
2021-12-31 11:10:08 PM  

khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]


Wow.  That is impressive.
 
2021-12-31 11:10:35 PM  

ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!


Let's hope that is the one glitch for the mission,
 
2021-12-31 11:10:55 PM  

Gubbo: Russ1642: Gubbo: ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!

There's no cameras on it. Wouldn't a few cameras have helped in working that out.

I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

/in addition to quadruple failsafes

It is a camera dumbass

Ummm.....yeah sure. Ok


They didn't strap GoPros to it because Elon Musk didn't tell them to. It's added weight and cost for nothing. What do you need next? RGB lighting? Let people name it Scopy McTelescope face?
 
2021-12-31 11:11:57 PM  

Archie Goodwin: mission,


Speaking of glitches, aaagh. ...mission.
 
2021-12-31 11:12:06 PM  

Gubbo: I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it


Solar radiation would fry a GoPro CCD sensor shortly after it left earth's atmosphere.
 
2021-12-31 11:20:57 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]

Wow.  That is impressive.


Yup.  Incredible!

When I first read how the overall deployment was planned to go, I just had this - numb, gray - feeling.  A hopeless feeling that it *couldn't* work as planned.

I am relieved, and humbled, to see how well this is going.

Please God, let the rest of this work as well!
 
2021-12-31 11:43:13 PM  

ryebread: I wasn't that worried about launch, or really anything up to the sunshield cover release, but I had been pretty damn anxious of that step (and boom deploy, and tensioning...)

Sounds like they did run into a small issue there, but were able to get past it.

"Switches that should have indicated that the cover rolled up did not trigger when they were supposed to. However, secondary and tertiary sources offered confirmation that it had. Temperature data seemed to show that the sunshield cover unrolled to block sunlight from a sensor, and gyroscope sensors indicated motion consistent with the sunshield cover release devices being activated."

The workarounds that NASA comes up with are one of my absolute favorite parts of space flight. Switches don't work? Fark it, we'll do it live!


"You are GO on the 1202 alarm"
...because our programmers considered the case of an overloaded processor and mitigated it. Have a pleasnt flight!
 
2022-01-01 12:09:23 AM  

Lsherm: Gubbo: I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

Solar radiation would fry a GoPro CCD sensor shortly after it left earth's atmosphere.


Someone probably also thinks that there's gigabytes of Internet available above LEO for video feeds.
 
2022-01-01 12:16:54 AM  

WelldeadLink: Lsherm: Gubbo: I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

Solar radiation would fry a GoPro CCD sensor shortly after it left earth's atmosphere.

Someone probably also thinks that there's gigabytes of Internet available above LEO for video feeds.


Counterpoint to you both:

Fark user imageView Full Size


/Gig-speed, no.
//Enough for video, yeah.
 
2022-01-01 12:16:59 AM  
Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]

Wow.  That is impressive.

Yup.  Incredible!

When I first read how the overall deployment was planned to go, I just had this - numb, gray - feeling.  A hopeless feeling that it *couldn't* work as planned.

I am relieved, and humbled, to see how well this is going.

Please God
engineers, let the rest of this work as well!
 
2022-01-01 12:24:39 AM  

Fursecution: WelldeadLink: Lsherm: Gubbo: I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

Solar radiation would fry a GoPro CCD sensor shortly after it left earth's atmosphere.

Someone probably also thinks that there's gigabytes of Internet available above LEO for video feeds.

Counterpoint to you both:

[Fark user image 850x478]

/Gig-speed, no.
//Enough for video, yeah.


Those weren't GoPro cameras. They did have the bandwidth in near earth orbit, but since the Webb telescope is going to sit behind the moon's orbit, bandwidth is compromised.

Also, note the cameras aren't working on Musk's Tesla anymore. The car is too far away and they don't have the battery for it. As it didn't launch with solar panels, the battery was the limiting factor.
 
2022-01-01 12:26:29 AM  

SonOfSpam: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]

Wow.  That is impressive.

Yup.  Incredible!

When I first read how the overall deployment was planned to go, I just had this - numb, gray - feeling.  A hopeless feeling that it *couldn't* work as planned.

I am relieved, and humbled, to see how well this is going.

Please God engineers, let the rest of this work as well!


*shrug*  God, Engineers, what is difference?
 
2022-01-01 12:34:45 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: SonOfSpam: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]

Wow.  That is impressive.

Yup.  Incredible!

When I first read how the overall deployment was planned to go, I just had this - numb, gray - feeling.  A hopeless feeling that it *couldn't* work as planned.

I am relieved, and humbled, to see how well this is going.

Please God engineers, let the rest of this work as well!

*shrug*  God, Engineers, what is difference?


Bad Ridley Scott movies?
 
2022-01-01 12:37:48 AM  

Lsherm: Fursecution: WelldeadLink: Lsherm: Gubbo: I think that just shows the age of the design that it doesn't have 300 go pros strapped on to it

Solar radiation would fry a GoPro CCD sensor shortly after it left earth's atmosphere.

Someone probably also thinks that there's gigabytes of Internet available above LEO for video feeds.

Counterpoint to you both:

[Fark user image 850x478]

/Gig-speed, no.
//Enough for video, yeah.

Those weren't GoPro cameras. They did have the bandwidth in near earth orbit, but since the Webb telescope is going to sit behind the moon's orbit, bandwidth is compromised.

Also, note the cameras aren't working on Musk's Tesla anymore. The car is too far away and they don't have the battery for it. As it didn't launch with solar panels, the battery was the limiting factor.


Never said they were. However, "GoPro" is the modern-day Xerox or Kleenex for small durable cameras, and we don't know that they aren't. Spacex has been known to use them inside fairings, for example.

The point was: a camera, in space, not in low Earth orbit. Not insurmountable with just minor modifications.
 
2022-01-01 12:41:45 AM  

Notabunny: A lot about this is amazing. There's a 300*F temperature difference between the hot and cold sides, and Webb is still a half a million miles from its destination


Yes, it's amazing......but the thing takes like 2 months to de-origami. Daily success updates are getting kinda meh.
 
2022-01-01 12:45:00 AM  

Fursecution: The point was: a camera, in space, not in low Earth orbit. Not insurmountable with just minor modifications.


I'm not sure we agree on what "minor" entails. Within a protected environment? Sure. Hanging out and exposed? That requires more work. You have to protect the internal boards from radiation, and that can require some significant work if you don't just put a regular camera in a box with a Faraday cage around it. The Webb telescope is going to be on the far side of the moon, you can't use a camera you bought at Best Buy to monitor operations.
 
2022-01-01 12:54:51 AM  

ryebread: khitsicker: ryebread: khitsicker: The first step of the actual sunshield deployment has been completed successfully!

https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477074540081692680

[Fark user image image 596x769]

The first boom deployed in just under 3.5 hours. The second started deploying around around an hour and a half ago, so hopefully we'll be hearing some more good news soon.

I am refreshing the wheres webb page like every 15 minutes.

I don't think they mention it or link to it, I only know because I just tried the URLs and got lucky, but there are Atom/RSS feeds if that makes your life a little less tedious.


Even with automated updates, I suspect a lot of us are obsessively hitting Refresh as a minor way of dealing with nervous tension.
 
2022-01-01 1:02:49 AM  
Shielding from the sun, shielding from the sun
shielding from the suuu-uuuu-uuunnnn


/ Billy Thorpe would've worked, too.
 
2022-01-01 1:27:40 AM  

Lsherm: Fursecution: The point was: a camera, in space, not in low Earth orbit. Not insurmountable with just minor modifications.

I'm not sure we agree on what "minor" entails. Within a protected environment? Sure. Hanging out and exposed? That requires more work. You have to protect the internal boards from radiation, and that can require some significant work if you don't just put a regular camera in a box with a Faraday cage around it. The Webb telescope is going to be on the far side of the moon, you can't use a camera you bought at Best Buy to monitor operations.


When it only needs to monitor the first week of deployment, sure you can.  Wrap it in a centimeter or two of aluminum and glass shielding and it'll work for plenty long enough.  But then you're adding more components to the critical areas for outgassing and thermal control, which presents risks to the mission (small ones, but nonzero).  NASA doesn't like doing that sort of thing, since they know they're never going to launch another one of these and won't get much value out of that video whether it shows things going perfectly or not.
 
2022-01-01 1:30:34 AM  

Lsherm: Fursecution: The point was: a camera, in space, not in low Earth orbit. Not insurmountable with just minor modifications.

I'm not sure we agree on what "minor" entails. Within a protected environment? Sure. Hanging out and exposed? That requires more work. You have to protect the internal boards from radiation, and that can require some significant work if you don't just put a regular camera in a box with a Faraday cage around it. The Webb telescope is going to be on the far side of the moon, you can't use a camera you bought at Best Buy to monitor operations.


A camera monitoring deployment would not need to last nearly as long as one for operations. Anyways, Gubbo's point is that for stuff designed in this decade, we expect cameras to be everywhere. I'm sure there's a company or three that can provide something with a stack of space-rating certifications.
 
2022-01-01 1:48:28 AM  
Halfway in distance, not time.
 
2022-01-01 2:09:19 AM  
Nicholas D. Wolfwood:I suspect a lot of us are obsessively hitting Refresh as a minor way of dealing with nervous tension.

YES.
 
2022-01-01 2:31:02 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: SonOfSpam: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1477124649465040897

Starboard side completed!

YES!!!

Also it looks like all the pins that needed to release have done so without issue. 107 single points of failure gone right there.

[Fark user image 594x710]

Wow.  That is impressive.

Yup.  Incredible!

When I first read how the overall deployment was planned to go, I just had this - numb, gray - feeling.  A hopeless feeling that it *couldn't* work as planned.

I am relieved, and humbled, to see how well this is going.

Please God engineers, let the rest of this work as well!

*shrug*  God, Engineers, what is difference?


(Paraphrasing 'Pitr' from an old 'User Friendly' strip - "God, Root, what ees deeference?")
 
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