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(CNN) Hero One time the Hero tag doesn't come close to being enough   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Hero, Iraq War, Improvised explosive device, legacy lives, enemy gunfire, President Donald Trump, Vietnam War, enemy fire, area of enemy forces  
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5867 clicks; posted to Politics » on 17 Dec 2021 at 12:17 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-12-17 12:19:17 AM  
No more war criminals being awarded like with TFG?
 
Azz
2021-12-17 12:21:02 AM  
I was expecting the article to be about someone kicking Kyle Rittenhouse in the nuts, rendering him sterile and impotent.

But this is satisfying too.
 
2021-12-17 12:25:04 AM  
Gzus. Cashe story is heavy. Good for Trump for lifting the statute of limitations but why did it take that long? And why was it Biden that had to award it after that?
 
2021-12-17 12:28:09 AM  
Cashe, Biden said, is the seventh service member to receive the Medal of Honor from Operation Iraqi Freedom and the first African American to receive the medal since the Vietnam War.

No Black solders were awarded the medal in the first Iraqi culling?
 
2021-12-17 12:28:56 AM  
But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)
 
2021-12-17 12:33:38 AM  

KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)


Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?
 
2021-12-17 12:36:54 AM  
Posthumous Medal of Honor citation for SFC Cashe as follows:

Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn C. Cashe distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while engaging with the enemy in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Oct. 17, 2005.
Cashe was conducting a nighttime mounted patrol when the Bradley Fighting Vehicle he was in charge of was attacked by enemy small-arms fire. An improvised explosive device disabled the vehicle, causing it to become engulfed in flames.
After exiting the vehicle, Cashe began to extract the trapped driver from the vehicle. After opening the hatch, Cashe and a fellow Soldier pulled the driver out, extinguished the flames on him and moved him to a position of relative safety. While doing so, Cashe's fuel-soaked uniform ignited, causing severe burns to his body, but he continued toward the rear of the vehicle to help other Soldiers who were trapped in the troop compartment.
At this time, the enemy noted Cashe's movements and began to direct fire on his position. When another element of the company engaged the enemy, Cashe seized the opportunity by moving into the open troop door and aiding four of his Soldiers to escape from the burning vehicle. Afterwards, he noticed two other Soldiers had not been accounted for, and he reentered the burning vehicle to retrieve them. Despite the severe second- and third- degree burns covering the majority of his body, Cashe persevered through the pain to encourage his fellow Soldiers and ensured they received needed medical care.
When the medical evacuation helicopters arrived, he selflessly refused to board until all of the other wounded Soldiers were evacuated first. Cashe died from wounds sustained in this action on Nov. 8, 2008, at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. His heroic actions, at the cost of his life, saved the lives of his teammates.
Throughout the entire engagement, Cashe repeatedly placed himself in extreme danger to protect his team and to defeat the enemy. Cashe's extraordinary heroism and selflessness beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
 
2021-12-17 12:41:05 AM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-17 12:41:28 AM  
its a hoagie
 
2021-12-17 12:43:14 AM  
I'm surprised the GOP leadership didn't try to squash awarding these MoH to show how anti-military the Dems are.
 
2021-12-17 12:43:53 AM  

The5thElement: Posthumous Medal of Honor citation for SFC Cashe as follows:

Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn C. Cashe distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while engaging with the enemy in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Oct. 17, 2005.
Cashe was conducting a nighttime mounted patrol when the Bradley Fighting Vehicle he was in charge of was attacked by enemy small-arms fire. An improvised explosive device disabled the vehicle, causing it to become engulfed in flames.
After exiting the vehicle, Cashe began to extract the trapped driver from the vehicle. After opening the hatch, Cashe and a fellow Soldier pulled the driver out, extinguished the flames on him and moved him to a position of relative safety. While doing so, Cashe's fuel-soaked uniform ignited, causing severe burns to his body, but he continued toward the rear of the vehicle to help other Soldiers who were trapped in the troop compartment.
At this time, the enemy noted Cashe's movements and began to direct fire on his position. When another element of the company engaged the enemy, Cashe seized the opportunity by moving into the open troop door and aiding four of his Soldiers to escape from the burning vehicle. Afterwards, he noticed two other Soldiers had not been accounted for, and he reentered the burning vehicle to retrieve them. Despite the severe second- and third- degree burns covering the majority of his body, Cashe persevered through the pain to encourage his fellow Soldiers and ensured they received needed medical care.
When the medical evacuation helicopters arrived, he selflessly refused to board until all of the other wounded Soldiers were evacuated first. Cashe died from wounds sustained in this action on Nov. 8, 2008, at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. His heroic actions, at the cost of his life, saved the lives of his teammates.
Throughout the entire engagement, Cashe repeatedly placed himself in extreme danger to protect his team and to defeat the enemy. Cashe's extraordinary heroism and selflessness beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.


That something farking else and superhuman. I wish our aristocracy would take to heart that these are the stories that are enabled when attempting to increase your margins in investments in funds leaning on certain industries.

My fellow left-leaners: don't blindly shiat on soldiers. Congress does that without your help.
 
2021-12-17 12:44:04 AM  

BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?


He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.
 
2021-12-17 12:51:18 AM  
Posthumous Medal of Honor citation for Sargeant 1st Class Christopher Celiz as follows:

As the leader of a special operations unit comprised of partnered forces and members of the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Celiz led an operation to clear an area of enemy forces and thereby disrupt future attacks against the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.
Shortly after his team reached their initial objective, a large enemy force attacked. The enemy placed effective fire on him and his team, preventing them from maneuvering to a counterattack. Realizing the danger to his team and the operation, Celiz voluntarily exposed himself to intense enemy machine-gun and small-arms fire.
Under fire, he retrieved and employed a heavy weapon system, thereby allowing U.S. and partnered forces to regain the initiative, maneuver to a secure location, and begin treating a critically wounded partnered force member.
As the medical evacuation helicopter arrived, it was immediately engaged by accurate and sustained enemy fire. Knowing how critical it was to quickly load the wounded partner, Celiz willingly exposed himself again to heavy enemy fire so he could take charge to direct and lead the evacuation. As the casualty was moved from a position of cover, Celiz made a conscious effort to ensure his body acted as a physical shield to protect his team, the injured partner and the crew of the aircraft from enemy fire. After the wounded partner was loaded, Celiz's team returned to cover, but he remained with the aircraft, returning a high volume of fire and constantly repositioning himself to act as a physical shield to the aircraft and its crew.
With his final reposition, Celiz placed himself directly between the cockpit and the enemy, ensuring the aircraft was able to depart. Upon the helicopter's liftoff, Celiz was hit by enemy fire. Fully aware of his injury, but understanding the peril to the aircraft, Celiz motioned to the pilots to depart rather than remain to load him. His selfless actions saved the life of the evacuated partnered force member and almost certainly prevented further casualties among other members of his team and the aircrew. Celiz died as a result of his injuries. His extraordinary heroism and selflessness beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Throughout the entire engagement, Celiz significantly changed the course of the battle by repeatedly placing himself in extreme danger to protect his team and defeat the enemy.
 
2021-12-17 12:52:34 AM  

Jairzinho: No more war criminals being awarded like with TFG?


No these were the good kind of occupiers
 
2021-12-17 12:52:42 AM  
Medal of Honor citation for Master Sargeant Earl Plumlee, US Army as follows:

Then-Staff Sgt. Earl D. Plumlee distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while engaging with the enemy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan, on Aug. 28, 2013.
Plumlee served as a weapons sergeant assigned to Charlie Company, 4th Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Forward Operating Base Ghazni, when the complex was attacked. Plumlee instantly responded to a massive explosion that caused a 60-foot breach in the base's perimeter wall. Ten insurgents wearing Afghan National Army uniforms and suicide vests poured through the breach.
Plumlee and five other special operations Soldiers, intent on defending the base, mounted two vehicles and raced toward the detonation site. Plumlee's driver purposefully maneuvered the vehicle into enemy fire to shield three dismounted teammates, two of whom were injured, placing the vehicle under effective enemy fire from the front and right side.
Using his body to shield the driver from enemy fire, Plumlee exited the vehicle while simultaneously drawing his pistol and engaging an insurgent 15 meters to the vehicle's right. Without cover and with complete disregard for his safety, he advanced toward the enemy force, engaging multiple insurgents with only his pistol. Upon reaching cover, he killed two insurgents.
Plumlee left cover and continued to advance alone. Moving forward, he engaged several combatants at close range. Under intense enemy fire, Plumlee temporarily withdrew to cover, where he joined another Soldier.
Plumlee, ignoring his injuries, quickly regained his bearings and reengaged the enemy. Intense enemy fire once again forced the two Soldiers to temporarily withdraw. Undeterred and resolute, Plumlee joined a small group of American and coalition soldiers moving from cover to counterattack the infiltrators. As the coalition forces advanced, Plumlee engaged an insurgent to his front-left.
Plumlee then ran to a wounded Soldier, carried him to safety, and rendered first aid. Afterwards, he organized three coalition members in a defensive stance as he methodically cleared the area, remained in a security posture and continued to scan for any remaining threats.
Throughout the entire engagement, Plumlee repeatedly placed himself in extreme danger to protect his team and the base, and to defeat the enemy. Plumlee' s extraordinary heroism and selflessness beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
 
2021-12-17 12:53:05 AM  
I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much
 
2021-12-17 12:53:32 AM  
I am super duper anti-war. But this seems more important in that he is ending the racist streak of a racist military and racist series of Commander-in-Chiefs who could not seem a way to award a Black person, not even one person, and not even Obama saw a way to overcome the potential danger to his command.

Biden is doing good and I hope he find plenty more Black (and other POC) armed service members deserving of the award.
 
2021-12-17 1:02:53 AM  

The5thElement: BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?

He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.


The official story is that somehow the reports of enemy fire weren't in the report and you have to be under fire to get a MOH (although that is a dumb reason, it's policy). A lot of people who know more about this than I do have said it's because they're still more reluctant to give the MOH to black soldiers.
 
2021-12-17 1:02:59 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: I am super duper anti-war. But this seems more important in that he is ending the racist streak of a racist military and racist series of Commander-in-Chiefs who could not seem a way to award a Black person, not even one person, and not even Obama saw a way to overcome the potential danger to his command.

Biden is doing good and I hope he find plenty more Black (and other POC) armed service members deserving of the award.


Three cheers for intersectionality in illegal American wars for territory and resources!
 
2021-12-17 1:03:50 AM  

BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?


Hey, you read the article! No fair!
 
2021-12-17 1:06:31 AM  

berylman: I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much


It IS a factor in how he got the MOH, in that if he were white, he would have gotten it 15 years ago. There's a reason there are so few black MOH recipients and he is the ONLY one since Vietnam, and it isn't a lack of heroic sacrifice. This specific case was so egregious it sparked a backlash, and they eventually got around to fixing it. For him. Which is great! For the other deserving troops, though, they remain unrecognized. (It's also true that awarding the MOH has become much rarer, but the racial disparity is still insane.)
 
2021-12-17 1:31:58 AM  
A lot of people don't mention this, but the Medal of Honor is made out of some really fine Belgium chocolate.
 
2021-12-17 1:33:38 AM  

Traborn: berylman: I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much

It IS a factor in how he got the MOH, in that if he were white, he would have gotten it 15 years ago. There's a reason there are so few black MOH recipients and he is the ONLY one since Vietnam, and it isn't a lack of heroic sacrifice. This specific case was so egregious it sparked a backlash, and they eventually got around to fixing it. For him. Which is great! For the other deserving troops, though, they remain unrecognized. (It's also true that awarding the MOH has become much rarer, but the racial disparity is still insane.)


It's really frustrating how this needs to be explained every time in similar circumstances, isn't it?
 
2021-12-17 1:43:50 AM  

Smoking GNU: Traborn: berylman: I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much

It IS a factor in how he got the MOH, in that if he were white, he would have gotten it 15 years ago. There's a reason there are so few black MOH recipients and he is the ONLY one since Vietnam, and it isn't a lack of heroic sacrifice. This specific case was so egregious it sparked a backlash, and they eventually got around to fixing it. For him. Which is great! For the other deserving troops, though, they remain unrecognized. (It's also true that awarding the MOH has become much rarer, but the racial disparity is still insane.)

It's really frustrating how this needs to be explained every time in similar circumstances, isn't it?


Tangentially related, but there was a Twitter thread about a guy who wanted to get a history degree, but was like, shocked about how much history was less about awesome battles in World War II and more about America's farked up racism lol

Just like, every time you see in our society that's really obtuse, counterintuitive, or bureaucratic and you ask yourself "that's really dumb. I wonder why it's set up that way," 9/10 times it's because it was to deny black people in the past.
 
2021-12-17 1:47:00 AM  

Smoking GNU: Traborn: berylman: I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much

It IS a factor in how he got the MOH, in that if he were white, he would have gotten it 15 years ago. There's a reason there are so few black MOH recipients and he is the ONLY one since Vietnam, and it isn't a lack of heroic sacrifice. This specific case was so egregious it sparked a backlash, and they eventually got around to fixing it. For him. Which is great! For the other deserving troops, though, they remain unrecognized. (It's also true that awarding the MOH has become much rarer, but the racial disparity is still insane.)

It's really frustrating how this needs to be explained every time in similar circumstances, isn't it?


it places the lotion in the skin or else it gets the hose again
 
2021-12-17 1:48:11 AM  
How can we convince the next generation of young men and women to volunteer for the meatgrinder that profits the owner class?
Better Pay? Healthcare? Housing?
Nah. We'll call the dead ones heroes; dead heroes are the best, they never speak against you.
\these soldiers deserve to be honoured for their actions
\\I don't like the fetishizing of the military
\\\For God's sake give Vets better healthcare
 
2021-12-17 1:50:31 AM  

berylman: I hate it how they keep up bringing Cache's race as if it was a factor in deciding why he got the MOH. He got it because he deserved it plain and simple....his grieving mother even said as much


He deserved it for his actions, he was denied it because of his race.
 
2021-12-17 1:51:44 AM  

Smoking GNU: It's really frustrating how this needs to be explained every time in similar circumstances, isn't it?


There are people on Both Sides with a vested interest in pretending that racism doesn't exist anymore.
 
2021-12-17 2:09:46 AM  
o7
 
2021-12-17 2:20:20 AM  
Thank you to all who serve honorably.
 
2021-12-17 2:32:56 AM  
He died from his injuries THREE YEARS LATER?!  Christ, that man must have been in some pain I can only imagine (and I'm disabled).
 
2021-12-17 2:32:56 AM  

Donald_McRonald: Bennie Crabtree: I am super duper anti-war. But this seems more important in that he is ending the racist streak of a racist military and racist series of Commander-in-Chiefs who could not seem a way to award a Black person, not even one person, and not even Obama saw a way to overcome the potential danger to his command.

Biden is doing good and I hope he find plenty more Black (and other POC) armed service members deserving of the award.

Three cheers for intersectionality in illegal American wars for territory and resources!


Shut the f*ck up.
 
2021-12-17 2:48:51 AM  
Pfffffttttt. The real American heroes are the meal team 6 members. The real heroes. They gathered to defend their community and the USA from the Soros buses full of Antifa super soldiers. Whatever small town that was at. They were willing to put their lives on the line. Right up until they would have seen the others being armed too. They know in their hearts that they are the true patriotic heroes. Wait. What hearts? What minds?

/S
 
2021-12-17 2:49:32 AM  

ViolentEastCoastCity: He died from his injuries THREE YEARS LATER?!  Christ, that man must have been in some pain I can only imagine (and I'm disabled).


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size


This concludes my ted talk.
 
2021-12-17 3:09:47 AM  

Traborn: The5thElement: BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?

He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.

The official story is that somehow the reports of enemy fire weren't in the report and you have to be under fire to get a MOH (although that is a dumb reason, it's policy). A lot of people who know more about this than I do have said it's because they're still more reluctant to give the MOH to black soldiers.


It doesn't take much going back through historical conflicts of the 20th century to see how many black and other minority soldiers were refused proper recognition and sometimes any recognition when they were absolutely textbook examples for it. Sometimes sympathetic COs would nominate for them a lesser award just so they'd get something, because they knew command wouldn't want to properly recognize them. It's depressing every time.

And then they're forgotten about more broadly because the entertainment industry likes to deal with only certain kinds of war scenarios. When people get their history from media, they tend to only see those scenarios, further erasing the lives of people already denied recognition.

Heroes are important. They make people feel connected to larger ideals that can be very difficult to cleave to during adversity. And recognizing them is part of that connection. Failure to recognize them cheapens their sacrifices, and makes it easier to ignore them and the toll exacted by their service. But it's easier on people who don't want to have confront complicated situations, it's more comfortable and easier to just sweep things under the rug.

Tl;dr:

Good, now go through the backlog. Some people have been waiting a damned long time.
 
2021-12-17 3:12:53 AM  

BlazeTrailer: The5thElement: Posthumous Medal of Honor citation for SFC Cashe as follows:

Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn C. Cashe distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while engaging with the enemy in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Oct. 17, 2005.
Cashe was conducting a nighttime mounted patrol when the Bradley Fighting Vehicle he was in charge of was attacked by enemy small-arms fire. An improvised explosive device disabled the vehicle, causing it to become engulfed in flames.
After exiting the vehicle, Cashe began to extract the trapped driver from the vehicle. After opening the hatch, Cashe and a fellow Soldier pulled the driver out, extinguished the flames on him and moved him to a position of relative safety. While doing so, Cashe's fuel-soaked uniform ignited, causing severe burns to his body, but he continued toward the rear of the vehicle to help other Soldiers who were trapped in the troop compartment.
At this time, the enemy noted Cashe's movements and began to direct fire on his position. When another element of the company engaged the enemy, Cashe seized the opportunity by moving into the open troop door and aiding four of his Soldiers to escape from the burning vehicle. Afterwards, he noticed two other Soldiers had not been accounted for, and he reentered the burning vehicle to retrieve them. Despite the severe second- and third- degree burns covering the majority of his body, Cashe persevered through the pain to encourage his fellow Soldiers and ensured they received needed medical care.
When the medical evacuation helicopters arrived, he selflessly refused to board until all of the other wounded Soldiers were evacuated first. Cashe died from wounds sustained in this action on Nov. 8, 2008, at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. His heroic actions, at the cost of his life, saved the lives of his teammates.
Throughout the entire engagement, Cashe repeatedly placed himself in extreme danger to protect his team and to defeat the enemy. Cashe's extraordinary heroism and selflessness beyond the call of duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

That something farking else and superhuman. I wish our aristocracy would take to heart that these are the stories that are enabled when attempting to increase your margins in investments in funds leaning on certain industries.

My fellow left-leaners: don't blindly shiat on soldiers. Congress does that without your help.


I shiat on the armed services, I shiat on the nationalist fervor with which we fellate them, I shiat on the Congress that enables war profiteering, I shiat on the corporations that push for all of it, and I shiat on soldiers that are just power-hungry angry young xenophobes.

But I see no reason to shiat on this guy, and I don't think anyone else does, and I find your insinuation about "left-leaners" insulting and unproductive.
 
2021-12-17 4:03:26 AM  
Good. far too many black soldiers were denied the honors they earned due to racist attitudes in the upper levels of the military in years past.

Doris Miller is a glaring example if a white sailor had done what he did he would have surely been awarded the Medal of Honor  but he got a Navy Cross.
 
2021-12-17 5:11:32 AM  

The5thElement: Posthumous Medal of Honor citation for SFC Cashe as follows:

Sgt. 1st Class Alwyn C. Cashe distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while engaging with the enemy in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Oct. 17, 2005.
Cashe was conducting a nighttime mounted patrol when the Bradley Fighting Vehicle he was in charge of was attacked by enemy small-arms fire. An improvised explosive device disabled the vehicle, causing it to become engulfed in flames.
After exiting the vehicle, Cashe began to extract the trapped driver from the vehicle. After opening the hatch, Cashe and a fellow Soldier pulled the driver out, extinguished the flames on him and moved him to a position of relative safety. While doing so, Cashe's fuel-soaked uniform ignited, causing severe burns to his body, but he continued toward the rear of the vehicle to help other Soldiers who were trapped in the troop compartment.
At this time, the enemy noted Cashe's movements and began to direct fire on his position. When another element of the company engaged the enemy, Cashe seized the opportunity by moving into the open troop door and aiding four of his Soldiers to escape from the burning vehicle. Afterwards, he noticed two other Soldiers had not been accounted for, and he reentered the burning vehicle to retrieve them. Despite the severe second- and third- degree burns covering the majority of his body, Cashe persevered through the pain to encourage his fellow Soldiers and ensured they received needed medical care.
When the medical evacuation helicopters arrived, he selflessly refused to board until all of the other wounded Soldiers were evacuated first. Cashe died from wounds sustained in this action on Nov. 8, 2008, at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. His heroic actions, at the cost of his life, saved the lives of his teammates.
Throughout the entire engagement, Cashe repeatedly placed himself in extreme danger to protect his team and to ...


Wow. I am usually one of the people at the front of the line criticizing our society for fellating the military at sporting events and such but I will be the first to admit that this man was 10 times the man I am.

RIP Hero
 
2021-12-17 5:56:14 AM  
Truman said he would trade the Presidency for an MOH.  An attempt was made to award him one, but he refused the award, and blocked every attempt to do so.  Reasoning simply that he had not earned it.
 
2021-12-17 6:14:27 AM  
Republicans will still have an issue with these soldiers getting one
 
2021-12-17 7:04:24 AM  
Why is this in the Politics tab?
 
2021-12-17 7:07:45 AM  

Traborn: The5thElement: BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?

He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.

The official story is that somehow the reports of enemy fire weren't in the report and you have to be under fire to get a MOH (although that is a dumb reason, it's policy). A lot of people who know more about this than I do have said it's because they're still more reluctant to give the MOH to black soldiers.


Interesting. So if a soldier sneaks into an enemy base, quietly breaks all of their necks, one by one, without alerting anyone, kidnaps the president of al qaeda and hauls ass out of there without a single shot being fired, they are ineligible for a MOH?
 
2021-12-17 7:23:04 AM  

IwasKloot: Traborn: The5thElement: BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?

He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.

The official story is that somehow the reports of enemy fire weren't in the report and you have to be under fire to get a MOH (although that is a dumb reason, it's policy). A lot of people who know more about this than I do have said it's because they're still more reluctant to give the MOH to black soldiers.

Interesting. So if a soldier sneaks into an enemy base, quietly breaks all of their necks, one by one, without alerting anyone, kidnaps the president of al qaeda and hauls ass out of there without a single shot being fired, they are ineligible for a MOH?


No, that just awards the "Hands On" achievement.
Tough one to get though.
 
2021-12-17 7:47:24 AM  

IwasKloot: Traborn: The5thElement: BlazeTrailer: KodosZardoz: But TFG was good for African Americans, right? I mean, what did they have to lose? (Other than their lives.)

Well...it says he lifted the time limit that allowed for Cashe. So...good, right? But he didn't award the medal so what DID come of his action?

He was originally awarded a Silver Star. How this happened, I don't know. His action was worthy of a Medal of Honor from the start in my opinion.

The official story is that somehow the reports of enemy fire weren't in the report and you have to be under fire to get a MOH (although that is a dumb reason, it's policy). A lot of people who know more about this than I do have said it's because they're still more reluctant to give the MOH to black soldiers.

Interesting. So if a soldier sneaks into an enemy base, quietly breaks all of their necks, one by one, without alerting anyone, kidnaps the president of al qaeda and hauls ass out of there without a single shot being fired, they are ineligible for a MOH?


Now you know why Steven Segal is so angry all the time.
 
2021-12-17 8:17:13 AM  
Every time I read one of these award citations, my jaw drops and I am more astounded than before. 

I wonder what the most *boring* of these stories is?
 
2021-12-17 8:24:22 AM  
*Salutes*
 
2021-12-17 8:36:30 AM  
/proud to be a fellow American.
 
2021-12-17 8:36:47 AM  

Jairzinho: No more war criminals being awarded like with TFG?


Yeah, what's up with that? Giving medals to actual heroes?
 
2021-12-17 8:43:58 AM  

KWess: Truman said he would trade the Presidency for an MOH.  An attempt was made to award him one, but he refused the award, and blocked every attempt to do so.  Reasoning simply that he had not earned it.


Killing thousands of civilians from the other side of the world with a single bomb is *like" bravery.
 
2021-12-17 9:16:53 AM  
... since the Vietnam war?

What the fark, black folks comprise 1/7 of the US population and are massively overrepresented in the military for economic reasons, what the hell is wrong with our government that it can't even pretend to not be racist for ten minutes for symbolic shiat like this?
 
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