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(Politico)   A look at the 17 ways Covid pushed us into the future   (politico.com) divider line
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688 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 10 Dec 2021 at 9:05 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2021-12-10 9:20:12 AM  
19 votes:
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2021-12-10 11:04:52 AM  
7 votes:

Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".


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2021-12-10 10:06:00 AM  
6 votes:

Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".


This....I was hoping for Arthur C. CLarke and got Philip K. Dick instead....
 
2021-12-10 10:54:20 AM  
6 votes:

exqqqme: hoodiowithtudio:
Cahokia.

Also wiped out by a pandemic

/smallpox irrc


Wow, you're old as balls!
 
2021-12-10 11:08:16 AM  
6 votes:

hoodiowithtudio: hoodiowithtudio: Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit

Centralia, Pennsylvania

Cahokia.


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2021-12-10 1:33:37 PM  
3 votes:

FlippityFlap: Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".

This....I was hoping for Arthur C. CLarke and got Philip K. Dick instead....


Philip K Dick was a starry eyed optimist.
And don't get me started on Orwell.
 
2021-12-10 8:32:39 PM  
3 votes:
Boss:  Print this out and distribute it.
 
2021-12-10 9:45:12 AM  
2 votes:
Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

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2021-12-10 10:19:06 AM  
2 votes:

Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit


Centralia, Pennsylvania
 
2021-12-10 10:26:32 AM  
2 votes:

hoodiowithtudio: Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit

Centralia, Pennsylvania


Cahokia.
 
2021-12-10 9:47:58 AM  
1 vote:
Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".
 
2021-12-10 5:34:44 PM  
1 vote:

exqqqme: Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

[Fark user image 491x673]


WFH will be a distant memory in a few years.
 
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