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(Politico)   A look at the 17 ways Covid pushed us into the future   (politico.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, QR Code, United States, pandemic levels, state level, whole host of temporary regulatory changes, pandemic brought travel, students of color, adult-use marijuana  
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688 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 10 Dec 2021 at 9:05 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-12-10 9:20:12 AM  
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2021-12-10 9:45:12 AM  
Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-10 9:47:58 AM  
Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".
 
2021-12-10 10:06:00 AM  

Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".


This....I was hoping for Arthur C. CLarke and got Philip K. Dick instead....
 
2021-12-10 10:10:23 AM  
What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.
 
2021-12-10 10:12:44 AM  

exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.


Detroit
 
2021-12-10 10:19:06 AM  

Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit


Centralia, Pennsylvania
 
2021-12-10 10:22:49 AM  
#8 Greatly sped up the coming decision between massive societal and economic and social reforms and survival or doing nothing & societal collapse.

I'm sure humanity will make the right decision.

/just like Rome, Sumeria, the late Bronze Age Mediterranean civilizations, etc.
 
2021-12-10 10:26:32 AM  

hoodiowithtudio: Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit

Centralia, Pennsylvania


Cahokia.
 
2021-12-10 10:26:50 AM  

exqqqme: Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

[Fark user image 491x673]


I think we're going to start seeing the office towers being re-vamped in the future.  The structures are still good and people still LIVE in cities, so my guess is that slowly but surely floors of office buildings will be changed over to housing or hotel space.
 
2021-12-10 10:43:27 AM  
hoodiowithtudio:
Cahokia.

Also wiped out by a pandemic

/smallpox irrc
 
2021-12-10 10:54:20 AM  

exqqqme: hoodiowithtudio:
Cahokia.

Also wiped out by a pandemic

/smallpox irrc


Wow, you're old as balls!
 
2021-12-10 11:04:52 AM  

Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-10 11:08:16 AM  

hoodiowithtudio: hoodiowithtudio: Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit

Centralia, Pennsylvania

Cahokia.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-10 1:10:47 PM  

exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.


Gas lines may be capped off fairly easily.  Sure there's locates and digging involved but typically an hour's work.  There are exceptions though.
The "wired" utilities often require loops to maintain their designs, and transformers and such.
Water and sewer are, in the north, just within the frost depth and require maintenance often.

If the whole town just died that would be easy to manage overall, but there's ALWAYS some holdouts, then squatters then...whatever comes next but is seldom pretty.
 
2021-12-10 1:33:37 PM  

FlippityFlap: Nick Nostril: Or "why every dystopian novel you've ever read was actually a documentary".

This....I was hoping for Arthur C. CLarke and got Philip K. Dick instead....


Philip K Dick was a starry eyed optimist.
And don't get me started on Orwell.
 
2021-12-10 1:41:55 PM  
New Orleans has had drive through daiquiris for decades.  Post Katrina I was taking classes from UNO online.  Who'd a thunk we'd be ahead of any tech curve.
 
2021-12-10 5:26:38 PM  
Ur
 
2021-12-10 5:34:44 PM  

exqqqme: Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

[Fark user image 491x673]


WFH will be a distant memory in a few years.
 
2021-12-10 5:35:26 PM  

rockymountainrider: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Gas lines may be capped off fairly easily.  Sure there's locates and digging involved but typically an hour's work.  There are exceptions though.
The "wired" utilities often require loops to maintain their designs, and transformers and such.
Water and sewer are, in the north, just within the frost depth and require maintenance often.

If the whole town just died that would be easy to manage overall, but there's ALWAYS some holdouts, then squatters then...whatever comes next but is seldom pretty.


When places become cheap enough, people will move in.
 
2021-12-10 5:35:56 PM  

exqqqme: Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

[Fark user image 491x673]


The actual amount of office space being vacated is very small, and office buildings usually can be converted to things like housing relatively easily.  The areas with the most problems with zoning laws aren't downtowns; the sea of suburbs full of single family housing only zoned areas is the main problem.
 
2021-12-10 5:39:04 PM  

Klivian: exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.

Detroit


Interestingly, the downtown part of Detroit (where all the office buildings are) is rather nice at this point.

It's the single family residential areas that are the war torn hellzones.
 
2021-12-10 7:22:00 PM  
The list:

1. Cocktails-to-go
2. Making cannabis essential
3. Telehealth
4. Hotels to housing
5. mRNA vaccines
6. Robot deliveries
7. Optional college exams
8. Direct cash assistance
9. Online education
10. QR codes
11. "Warp Speed" government investing
12. Free school meals - for everyone
13. Netflix for jobs
14. "Streateries"
15. Voting by mail
16. "Zooming"
17. "Silent" restaurant service
 
2021-12-10 8:32:39 PM  
Boss:  Print this out and distribute it.
 
2021-12-10 8:59:35 PM  

exqqqme: What happens when a city dies? Because I think that's what we're going to be seeing especially in smaller less economically diverse municipalities.

As an example, I'm thinking specifically of Gary IN. That was a company town in every sense of the word. Build and planned by US Steel, it's population and it's tax base was directly or indirectly dependent on a single employer.

The population today is 1/3 of what it was just 60 years ago. Infrastructure and services can't be funded and more importantly, it can't be maintained. It's easy to see what's happening on the surface; schools get boarded up, garbage services are reduced, roads crumble.

But more insidious are the things we don't see below our feet. Gas, sewer and water lines all need maintenance. Those fail and you have an environmental catastrophe.


Wheeling, WV. Originally a coal mining city of ~60k before the Rust Belt became the rust belt. Lost roughly half of its population, but the gas pipeliners kept it from becoming a ghost town. That won't last.
 
2021-12-10 11:18:39 PM  

hoodiowithtudio: Ur


I might give Ashurbanipal credit for that one. That dude was hardcore.
 
2021-12-10 11:22:46 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: exqqqme: Urban centers are going to have to adjust - and that's going to be very, very difficult. WFH is not going away and unless zoning regulations get with the times all those shiny buildings are going to be empty monuments to another time...

[Fark user image 491x673]

WFH will be a distant memory in a few years.


Now watch me whip
Now watch me neigh neigh
 
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